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NS 1.27.6.30

1 January 2015

RHYTHMIC 20 Thu Jan 1, 2015 YELLOW CRYSTAL STAR
Guided by Universal Fire KIN 168 Waxing Gibbous 84.1%

Limi

13-Moon Natural Time Calendar
RHYTHMIC MOON 6 Organize – Balance – Equality

Book of the Transcendence • Cosmic History Chronicles • Volume VI
Book of the Transcendence • Cosmic History Chronicles • Volume VI
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Day Six: LIMI
Level 1: Meditating the Manipura (Solar Plexus) Chakra
Sit in a comfortable meditative posture. Keep your spine erect and body relaxed. With the body
completely still, practice a few moments of natural mind meditation. Once the mind is sufficiently
clear, direct your attention to your solar plexus or Manipura chakra. Make it as clear and pristine
as possible, glistening and sparkling with vibrant energy. When it is pure and translucent, radiating
from your solar plexus, allow it to dissolve and transform itself into a yellow ten-petalled lotus.
Concentrate on this area inside your solar plexus. The solar plexus is considered the second brain
and the central storehouse of prana. The energy stored in this chakra can be used to connect us
both individually and as a planet, through the Sun, to the galactic core, Hunab Ku. In the Tibetan
tradition this chakra is known as mani padma, or “jeweled lotus.” This is the point where all 72,000
nerve endings (on each side of the body) meet, for a total of 144,000 nerve endings.
This chakra is governed by the feminine principle or Shakti Goddess Lakini (Authority). This chakra
center is also associated with willpower, and power in general; it is the place of empowerment and
disempowerment, judgment and identity. The solar plexus is the processing chamber of the instinctual/
intuitive energy and emotional intelligence. This energy is transferred to the heart chakra where the
transduction of emotional energy is experienced as the “intelligence of the heart.”
Meditation on the Manipura chakra leads to knowledge of the entire physical and subtle body
system. When this center is purified and awakened, then it is possible to reconnect (via the etheric
“highway” of the kuxan suum or cosmic umbilical cord) to the center of the galaxy, Hunab Ku. When
this reconnection takes place the body becomes disease-free and luminous, and consciousness does
not fall back into a lower state.
This chakra is often compared to the heat and the power of the Sun, radiating and distributing
pranic energy throughout the entire human system. To awaken this chakra, breathe slowly into the
solar plexus and feel the expansion and contraction of the navel as you breathe in and out through
the naval. Breathe in, hold and suck the stomach in, then push it out when you exhale. Do this
several times focusing on the purification of the abdominal area.
Chapter 5 • Synchrogalactic Yoga II: the Practices
27
From this center feel the kuxan suum as the etheric fiber that flows directly to the center of the
galaxy, making the solar plexus chakra a vital information receptacle. The kuxan suum connects the
planetary circuit with the solar and galactic circuits.
Through an effort of imaginal will, we can direct our astral body through the reflective membrane of
the planetary field into the Sun and then ultimately to the galactic core. This is the area allowing us
to transmute and override primitive lower emotions by opening to receive the influx of higher cosmic
energy. It is important to visualize the kuxan suum as a luminous etheric thread extending from the
solar plexus to the center of the galaxy. This establishes us in the galactic order of reality.
Manipura affirmation: May our perceptions be organized into a cosmic whole that we may all become one
with the radialized order of the Primal Source!
Level 2: Activating Radial Plasma: Limi
Breathe deeply through both your nostrils and allow your awareness to flow up your nose and down
into your solar plexus chakra. Bring your awareness to the inner Limi plasma at the center of the
chakra. Visualize the red symbol radiating luminous streams of white light.
Feel the Limi plasma vibrating, electrically gathered in the solar plexus, accounting for the mental
electron electrical charge, which is in telepathic resonance with the North Pole.
Repeat the following while focusing on your solar plexus chakra: “I consume dualistic thoughts as
food, I purify the mental-electron at the North Pole.” Feel all conditioned thoughts dissolve in the
light of intrinsic awareness.
Cover your left nostril with your left thumb and breathe deeply three times in and out through your
right nostril. Flash onto the Limi plasma and feel the galactic connection out of the solar plexus. Now
cover the right nostril with the right thumb and repeat the three breaths. Focus all of your attention
Book of the Transcendence • Cosmic History Chronicles • Volume VI
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to your solar plexus chakra, Limi plasma, and feel into the galactic reality being pulsed, breathed and
radiated from your solar plexus chakra into the world.
Feel the Limi plasma gathered in the solar plexus accounting for the mental electron charge in
telepathic resonance with the North Pole. The Limi charge is the second of three plasmas to form
the telepathic quantum. This is the second telepathic plasma where you take the sensory quantum
transmutations and breathe them out into the world through your solar plexus, emanating stabilizing
vibrations to the astral and emotional bodies, soothing the rest of the chakras.
At the center of Limi feel the integrated charges of the sensory quanta: Dali, Seli,
and Gamma, transmuted by Kali and the Alpha telepathic charge which initiates the
telepathic quanta. Then by extending your mind telepathically to the north of the
Planet, place the mental electron at the North Pole and purify it.
Level 3: Engaging the Sixth Mental Sphere (Subliminal Conscious)
Hyperneutronic subliminal consciousness activates sixth mental sphere.
Visualize the sixth mental sphere (subliminal conscious) located in the brain above the right ear in
the right cerebral hemisphere. This sphere governs and controls the left lateral hemisphere. (Note
how 5th and 6th mental spheres govern parts of the brain opposite their locus, exhibiting together a
type of crossover polarity).
Subliminal means you are operating independent of past and future; this is how people can
contact different entities on different planes of existence. Since subliminal consciousness
is independent of past and future, you can tune into it at the conscious level, suspending all
conditioned thought-programs. This mental sphere functions with the third-dimensional “self,”
storing impressions which are then transmuted into subliminal patterns of communication.
The sixth mental sphere allows us access to the parapsychic, supramental realm. This is the seat of
the telepathic scanning system and interdimensional programs. To experience this, relax and focus
your breath awareness on the psychic passages between the root, solar plexus and throat centers. Feel
the upward circulation of energy and visualize yourself as a cosmic antenna for higher intelligence.
Open yourself to become a telepathic receptor of higher mind capable of transmitting and receiving
subliminal messages.
Chapter 5 • Synchrogalactic Yoga II: the Practices
29
This intention, maintained through undistracted, non-conceptual meditative awareness, activates
higher mind telepathic receptivity. This can also be realized and cultivated through dreamtime.
Note that this mental sphere contains subliminal suggestive impulses that affect third-dimensional
functions as “intuitive flashes” (but which may actually be telepathic transmissions from remote points
of supermental cosmic civilization trying to establish “contact”). These contacts leave impressions
in the sixth mental sphere, which may be transmitted or transduced in any number of ways, which
include ear-ringing, subliminal or hypnogogic imagery, déjà vu’s, etc.
Level 4: Opening the Sixth Heptad Gate (402)
Visualize the yellow ten-petaled lotus Manipura chakra with the red Limi
plasma superimposed over it at your solar plexus. Hold this visualization and
feel the two intermingle as you chant the sacred letter HRUM as long as
your breath can sustain it.
Locate Heptad Gate 402 and the Hyperneutron symbol on the 441 holomind perceiver. Its matrix
location is V11:H8, eighth circuit, 9th time dimension, inner core time. Now locate it in your body at
the back, top center of your skull (see graphic at the end of this chapter).
Visualize the Hyperneutron with the rectilinear blue Duar force field above the red Limi in
your solar plexus chakra. Take the Hyperneutron into the sixth mental sphere in the sixth time
dimension (blue Duar electroluminic force field H11:V15-21, left-handed time) where it activates the
subliminal conscious as hyperneutronic subliminal conscious informing mental spheres three
and four.
From the sixth mental sphere, mentally direct the Hyperneutron to the solar plexus chakra and
impress it above the Limi seal. Hold this with four alternate nostril breaths (four times in and out
through each nostril), followed by one breath through both nostrils.
Ascend up the central column (spine), secreting the Hyperneutron (blue duar force field) into all
144,000 etheric fibers of the astral body. Practice the breath of fire, rapid shallow breathing through
the nose, transmuting any blockages or obscurations into streams of crystal clear hyperneutronic
subliminal consciousness spreading through your entire nervous system.
The black Hyperneutron with spectral, electric blue Duar force field vibrates subtle
activating neutronic force into all etheric fibers. Descend back down the central channel and
Book of the Transcendence • Cosmic History Chronicles • Volume VI
leave Limi at the solar plexus chakra. Return your consciousness to the sixth mental sphere,
then close and seal the Heptad Gate at the back top-side of your skull. Relax and breathe slowly
and deeply at least 13 times.
Harmonic UR rune 81: Radiogenesis Establishes Galactic Life Whole.
For additional practice: Locate Heptad Gate 402 on the Hunab Ku 21. Note that it corresponds to
the Yogi/Yogini, the Meditation Master, Holder of the Transcendental Wisdom; S/P Neptune, Bode
Number 300. Study all of the connections (see graphic at the end of this chapter).

Book of the Transcendence • Cosmic History Chronicles • Volume VI
Chakras 8 and 9: Root of Root and Crown of Crown
Root of Root chakra extends to and encompasses the Earth’s octahedral
core; it is the matrix for grounding cosmic mediumship. The Earth core
chakra is what gives us the ability to communicate with elemental spirits.
Crown of Crown chakra extends to and encompasses the Earth’s
noosphere. The noospheric crown is the higher mind control that tunes
us into the higher telepathic collective consciousness, the field of the
planetary logos, and to supreme supermental superconscious states of
cosmic consciousness.
The central activity of these two chakras is to coordinate evolutionary
functions or processes within the celestial body (one planet) wherein they
hold their energy field. The higher celestial logoi act on every aspect and
facet of consciousness evolution through the mental spheres; this opens up
a diverse range of possibilities of consciousness, perception, sensation, etc.
This extends to the upper realms into the laws of destiny, laws of creation and the absolute. This is
the realm of cosmic design that defines the infrastructure of the universe we live in. It is the realm of
the 5-D higher self, the body of radiance of the planetary logos as the transductive accumulator of all
hierarchies, commands and ordinances. As the root of root is the reservoir of cosmic mediumship, so
the crown of crown is fulfillment and realization of all cosmic consciousness possibilities.

Yellow Crystal Star Reading – Hide
YellowCrystal Star

Yellow Star is your Conscious Self – who you are and who you are becoming.You are a starseed! You contain a holographic ‘seed packet’ of your evolution into the Mind of Light and the energy that directs you toward wholeness. This resonance offers an expanded view of the larger self and new ways of perceiving reality. Through self-acceptance, you are gifted with this journey. Yellow Star is ignition, like a cosmic milkweed explosion of resonant sparks. It is the launching pad from which you can hear the rumble of the rocket of your accelerated evolution.

The energy of Yellow Star may be experienced as a gentle rocking that becoes a floating and spiraling sensation, ending in a rush of feeling as you move into expanded reality. This sensation has been described as gently cascading fireworks, shimmering burst on the tapesty of Creation. Cascade into this unchartged perspective. Flow on the cosmic winds wherever Divinity directs, arching back to this reality wth a new experience of self.

Yellow Star’s starseeded gift is the revelation of the harmony that unites all things. Instead of just aspiring to be harmonious, become harmony. Practice harmony not just as an abstraction, but as a living reality. This practice blends different energies, thoughts, people, and processes. Act on intuitive guidance as to what to combine and when. As you begin to follow your heart, you will know the feeling of being on the return path to the stars.Yellow Star offers you the ability to hold a greatly expanded focus, a unity of awareness that encompasses aspects of the larger constellation of self. An example of this would be a simultaneous awareness of the desires of the existential self and the truth of the Essence Self. This star harmony encompasses the greatly enlarged perspective of your starseeded self, the part within you that holds the potential of your greatest destiny.Unlike the preceding 7 tones, which were seperate and distinct, Yellow Star begins a more complex harmonic series as it completes the preceding octave. On a spiritual level, Yellow Star begins the development of higher being. The fundamental tones that occur in this series are of a more expanded frequency than those of the preceding seven tones. In this new octave, there is alignment in the harmonies of Earth and the harmonies of the stars that are now being sounded on Earth. Yellow Star is the first in a series of star harmonies that evoke accelerated growth of the starseed potential within you.

Yellow Sun is your Higher Self & Guide.”I Am that I Am…I Am that I Am…I Am that I Am.” This mantra of Yellow Sun is a meditation for accessing the I Am presence that contains great power and universal truth. Yellow Sun is the mystery unveiled, the simplicity of unconditional love and limitless bliss. Known by many names, Yellow Sun is the Solar Lord, the Mind of Light, the Center that is also your center. Yellow Sun is your solar home, the Great Central Sun.

Yellow Sun is a reminder that you are, at every moment, in the center of All That Is. In your journey of remembrance, you are crafting a light body to return to a home in the stars that you never really left. Return as a child of the sacred to the Great Central Sun! You are the crown of creation, infused with the blueprint of solar mind. You are a Godseed, the reflection of cosmic consciousness. You are love made visible!

Discover the simple secret encoded in Yellow Sun’s star-glyph: you are unconditional love, the stone of indestructible liberation. Radiate that knowing in all your thoughts and actions. Love all of creation. Join the dance of light, the fundamental constant of nature, and shine forth the clarity of your true essence. There is great power in simply identifying with the light:”As above, so below.” You are in God, and God is in you.

As you express unconditional love, you become more than you previously perceived yourself to be. You become illumined, the full manifestation of your divinity. In the embrace of your humanity, accept yourself and others unconditionally. Magnify your full presence. Yellow Sun will come in myriad forms to assist you. Be limitless. Accept and understand the nature of judgement, fear, light and dark within yourself and others. Love and accept yourself and others as you are, freed from previous boundaries. You are the dawning of the solar age.As you move toward your core of light, you will find a clear-light awareness that is innately innocent. In this place, the mind is restored to it’s original state of receptivity. Clarity and freedom become expressions of being, and bliss becomes the body. At this core of light, a new reality is born. From the union of the divine masculine and feminine is birthed the solar androgyny of cosmic consciousness.

Now we find ourselves in a great awakening. We have the opportunity to retrace our steps, to return to union with Original Cause. We who have deepened the illusion of seperation are now poised to retrieve what seemed to be lost forever. Through the gift of rebirth and ascension, we are reclaiming our original state of union with God. We are going home.The process of rebirth and ascension can be viewed simply as the raising of the vibratory rate of the Earth and her children. It is embodied in the state of consciousness that knows the self as divine. The circlet, or crown, is a symbol of recognizing and knowing that divine self. So the crown as a sacred tool is a universal symbol of the completion of a circle of self-empowerment and self-authority. Full ascension is the freedom to take your physical form with you to other planes and dimensions. In preparation for the ascension, there is an opening and clearing of your light seals and chakras. If you choose to walk this path, know that in the embodiment of your “I Am” self, you will learn to accept all things unconditionally, forgiving and releasing all judgements of yourself and others. The activation of solar mind and ascension is already in progress. In divine fusion, you are becoming the one body of the ascension.Open your heart as a flower to the Sun, and become the same love that holds universes together!

Red Skywalker is your Subconscious Self and Hidden Helper.

Red Skywalker is the skywalker, the time/space traveller who can jump dimensions to assist you in realizing heaven on Earth. Red Skywalker is unlimited in form but often chooses the form of the angelic messenger.

A person who embodies cosmic wisdom may be known as a sky-walker, sage or bodhisattva. When others see such light in human form, they feel the vibration of heaven. This vibration may be embodied by you or experienced with a guru, master, an energy such as Red Skywalker, or in a ‘chance’ encounter with an extraordinary person.

An encounter with the energy of Red Skywalker can spark a deep yearning within you for reunion with the Source. Yet from this place of love and compassion, you also have a desire (embodied in physical form) to serve the light. This is the place in you that has the courage to fully express unconditional love, the depths of your being. Red Skywalker asks you to live the new myth by bringing this heaven to Earth in your daily life. As this reality is lived, it touches and awakens the same truth in others: “They kingdom come, Thy will be done, on Earth as it is in heaven.”

Red Skywalker represents balance in your life – not static balance, but a dynamic equilibrium that includes both your present expression and your starseeded self. In Red Skywalker’s star-glyph you see that the pillars of heaven don’t appear to touch the Earth. You are the element that appears to be missing in the star-glyph. You are the one whose expression of the light assists in drawing the pillars of heaven to Earth.

Joining these pillars in yourself can be viewed as reuniting your male and female aspects. Together, in balance, we create the pillars of the etheric temples of heaven on Earth.

The natural state of every system moves toward balance that is fluid and free, as in dance. That balance is experienced differently by each person, but it often brings a sense of steadiness or centeredness even in the midst of movement and change. When you are dancing, you can use your very state of imbalance to create the fluidity of the dance.

White Mirror represents your Challenge and Gift. With maturity and awareness this challenge will turn into a Focus. This is what you desire to learn in this lifetime.Have you unconsciously created a reality in which you seem lost or confused? In this shadow, you may feel enmeshed in the illusions of the hall of mirrors. Remember that the only real power the hall of mirrors has is your belief that its grand illusions are real! On Earth, we presently live on a holographic playing field made of the elements of time and space. This field draws to itself the density and mass necessary to form a three-dimensional reality. All phenomena within it are images that appear for our learning and growth. Since each of us is a hologram of light within the larger hologram, getting lost in fear, judgement, and denial can certainly appear to be “real”, but it is really only an illusion. The essential mind is silent, still, empty – hence, incapable of getting lost.The transformation offered in this shadow is found by being mindful. Meditate and pray for the reestablishment of your direct connection to Spirit. Become quiet and still. Imagine yourself floating timelessly in the center of the star-glyph White Mirror, receiving divine wisdom. Cut away with clear discrimination. Forgive and release yourself and others. Enter into the timeless truth of the spiritual warrior.Another shadow transformation of White Mirror may be found in seeing yourself clearly in the mirrors of the world and other people. Using others as mirrors allows you to experience hidden truths about yourself. Ask for honest feedback from friends you trust. Risk hearing the truth about yourself. Openly observe the events in your life to see how they can be used to better understand who you actually are.One of the most self-limiting illusions is the belief that one’s own view of reality is the only one. This often causes the mirror of the world to reflect back to you your “unseen” shadow, and when you see this shadow, it can produce a judgement or reaction. Such emotionally charged situations usually have two poles or positions. When you believe that only you are right, both poles remain charged and fixed. For a moment, experiment with letting go or changing your position. As you loosen your hold and step aside, the “other position” or person is freed to change as well.Understand that judgement and acceptance are two sides of the same mirror – the transparent mirror of ascension.

Blue Monkey is your Compliment – something that comes naturally to you.Blue Monkey represents the Divine Child, the child that is ever in a state of open-hearted wisdom, innocence, trust, simplicity and joyful wonder. What would it feel like to actually BE a magical child in this culture and time? The secret that very few know – because they may feel more comfortable trying to protect themselves – is that the divine child offers the strongest of all protections, the invulnerability of openhearted Love. Through innocence, a kind of immunity is created that allows the divine child to be transparent so that the apparent ‘slings and arrows’ of the world can pass right through without being personalized into wounds, reactions or hurt feelings. This is the path of innocence regained. Transparency is the path of the new consciousness.Look deeply into the eyes of a happy two year old. There you will see the innocent trust, openheartedness, and spontaneous joy that typifies the divine child. Imagine yourself as an enlightened two-year old, in a state of ecstatic communion and delight. In childhood, you didn’t have to remember to be playful – you could easily and fluidly express your emotions. You didn’t have to understand whys and wherefores – you knew with your heart. This if your natural state of being, the state of ecstasy, the path of revealed innocence.In Western culture, many people have a distorted understanding about what it is to be a human being. We are often taught that sucessful adults are responsible, serious, rigid, controlled and goal oriented. In your journey with society, your developmental stages may have been incomplete. The natural sensitivity, fluidity, and freedom of the child may have been left behind in partial passage. Perhaps your inner child was wounded or treated insensitively, and you carried this unresolved process into adulthood. Blue Monkey encourages you to bring forth this incomplete or wounded part for integration and healing.In this New Myth, your spontaneous, divine child will usher in and anchor the new frequency. How can you heal your inner child? Explore what truly gives you joy. Find types of work that support your sensitivity and create deep satisfaction. Be simple: love, play, dance, draw, colour, sing. These activities are for all divine children – they serve the expression of the magical child in everyone. Consciously make time for the joyful freedom and magic of play!

The number for Blue Monkey is eleven, the vibration wherein novelty and spontaneity break down resistant forms. When unity merges with Essence Self, a mystical foundation is created that disintegrates old patterns. This is actually integration in disguide. As your walls tumble down, they crack into a smile, and the illumination of self shines through.

Your Tone is Tone 12 – CrystalStability in expansion, greater constellation, union of polarity, framework of connectedness.

Twelve is the ray of Complex Stability, the foundation of self and the foundation of essence in union with the mystical truth of polarity. All things are interwoven in the dance of yin and yang. All parts make up a greater whole. Draw on the wisdom, strength, and stability you derive as a member of the greater coucil. No matter what your experience, there is a complex stability in the larger pattern that invites you to feel stable as you expand and evolve. Living in a world of polarities, yet knowing that all parts are one in the unified whole, creates the underlying framework of connectedness. The hologram of polarity is simply the structure, the loom upon which worlds and realities are woven.

Stability is a matter of perception. Find where you can openly flow and expand in the midst of seeming complexity. Utilize the relationships created by polarity to explore and expand any self-limiting construct. Open your perceptions. Through you, the mysterious balance of the cosmos is fulfilled.

The above reading is an excerpt from the book, “The Mayan Oracle – Return Path to the Stars” by Ariel Spilsbury & Michael Bryner – Click here to email Ariel and purchase a signed copy!

Yellow Crystal Star Reading – Hide
Happy New Year
from all of us at SSP!

<< Thursday January 01, 2015 >>
NS1.27.6.20
<< Kin: 168 >>
YELLOW CRYSTAL STAR
Tone: 12 Crystal
Universalize * Cooperation * Dedicate

Tribe: 8 Star
Beautify * Art * Elegance

Affirmation for: Yellow Crystal Star
I Dedicate in order to Beautify
I Universalize Art
I seal the store of elegance
With the Crystal tone of Cooperation
I am guided by the power of Universal Fire
Reading for: Yellow Crystal Star
I JUST REALIZED THAT THE DAY OF THE MONTH SHOULD GET THE ENTIRE CHAPTER INCLUDING ALL POINTS FOR THE CORRESPONDING CHAPTER OF THE DAY OF THE MONTH. BUT, THE KIN THAT IS ASSOCIATED WITH A PARTICULAR DAY OF THE MONTH SHOULD CONSIST OF OTT’S POINT OF 231 WHICH CAN BE SAID TO CORRESPOND.
THEREFORE:

TODAY SHOULD HAVE OTT ALL POINTS CHAPTER 20 AND POINT 168/231

SO: POINT 168 = KIN 168 = 18TH POINTS IN THE 20TH CHAPTER:

Point Eighteen, concerning the bow of obeisance based on the passage on opening, showing, awakening, and causing to enter (chapter two, Expedient Means)

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: Another place where the bow of obeisance is conducted is the passage that tells how the Buddhas wish for the sake of all living beings to carry out four actions, namely, to “open, show, awaken, and cause them to enter” the Buddha wisdom. This passage in the “Expedient Means” chapter therefore represents the second place where the bow of obeisance is carried out.
[In his Words and Phrases, volume ten, T’ien-t’ai] interprets this to mean that within one’s heart one possesses the understanding of the bodhisattva Never Disparaging. He interprets this understanding to mean the understanding that all living beings possess innate Buddhahood. To open up the Buddha nature that is innate in them, the Buddhas appear in the world. This is what the sutra means when it says, “To open the door of Buddha wisdom to all living beings” (chapter two, Expedient Means).
Chapter Twenty: The Bodhisattva Never Disparaging
Thirty important points

Point One, regarding Bodhisattva Never Disparaging

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: The word “Constantly” in the name [Constantly] Never Disparaging refers to the bodhisattva Never Disparaging who is constantly present in the three existences of past, present, and future. The name “Never p.151Disparaging” refers to the three inherent potentials of the Buddha nature1 that is present in the minds of all living beings. The Buddha nature is the Dharma nature. And the Dharma nature is Myoho-renge-kyo.

Point Two, regarding the bodhisattva Gainer of Great Authority [to whom this chapter is addressed]

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: The word “Gainer” stands for the manifested body, the word “Great” stands for the Dharma body, and the word “Authority” stands for the reward body.
Or again, we may say that the word “Gainer” stands for the truth of temporary existence, the word “Great” stands for the Middle Way, and the word “Authority” stands for the truth of non-substantiality.
The whole then represents the perfect unification of the three truths and the three bodies.

Point Three, regarding the Buddha Awesome Sound King

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: The word “Awesome” refers to the element of form or body, and the word “Sound” refers to the element of mind. The word “King” refers to the nonduality of body and mind.
Now that we have entered the Latter Day of the Law, to chant Nam-myoho-renge-kyo is to be an Awesome Sound King. The reason is that the word “Sound” stands for the daimoku, or titles, of all various provisional teachings, while the word “Awesome” stands for the five characters of the title [of the Lotus Sutra, Myoho-renge-kyo]. And the word “King” stands for the practitioners of the Lotus Sutra.
p.152The daimoku of the Lotus Sutra is like the roar of a lion, while the other sutras are like the cries of the other beasts. The Lotus Sutra is referred to as “king” because it is “king of the sutras” (chapter twenty-three, Medicine King).
Now when Nichiren and his followers chant Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, they become the Buddha Awesome Sound King.

Point Four, on the passage “This monk, whatever persons he happened to meet, whether monks, nuns, laymen, or laywomen, would bow in obeisance to all of them and speak words of praise.”

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: This passage means to see and understand that now all living beings in the country of Japan have the capacity to embrace the daimoku of the Lotus Sutra [and thereby attain Buddhahood].

Point Five, regarding the passage “I have profound reverence for you, I would never dare treat you with disparagement or arrogance. Why? Because you are all practicing the bodhisattva way and are certain to attain Buddhahood.”

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: These twenty-four Chinese characters that make up this passage are different [in wording] from the five characters of Myoho-renge-kyo, but the meaning is the same. These twenty-four characters represent the Lotus Sutra in miniature.

Point Six, on the words “This monk did not devote his time to reading or reciting the scriptures, but simply went about bowing to people.”

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: The word “bowing” means to press the palms together in obeisance. Pressing the palms together represents the Lotus Sutra. It represents, that is, the principle of three thousand realms in a single moment of life. That is why the text says that this monk “did not devote p.153his time to reading or reciting the scriptures, but simply went about bowing to people.”

Point Seven, on the words “And if he happened to see any of the four kinds of believers far off in the distance, he would purposely go to where they were, bow to them and speak words of praise.”

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: The words “whatever persons he happened to meet” or see, which appeared earlier, refer to seeing or perceiving that all people are endowed with the Buddha nature in their minds. This is the principle of the matter. But in the present passage concerning those whom the monk happened to “see far off,” because mention is made of the “four kinds of believers,” it refers to the actual practice involved.
Thus, the earlier passage means to see in terms of the element of the mind, while the present passage means to see in terms of the element of the body. The term “element of the body” refers to the enlightenment revealed in the essential teaching, the revelation that the four factors of teaching, practice, person, and principle converge on the one world of Buddhahood.2 To see in terms of the element of the mind refers to the meaning of the theoretical teaching, which is also a revelation in which the four factors converge on the one world of Buddhahood.
The single word “far” (on) in the phrase “far off” refers to the “far distant” (kuon) time revealed in the “Life Span” chapter. That p.154is why the text says that the monk “would purposely go . . . bow to them.”

Point Eight, on the words “Among the four kinds of believers there were those who gave way to anger, their minds lacking in purity.”

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: Those who slander the Law are impure in both body and mind. First, impurity in the element of the mind is what this passage refers to when it says that “their minds” were “lacking in purity.” The impurity of the body is referred to in the passage in the “Simile and Parable” chapter that reads, “His body will always smell bad, / filthy and impure.”
Now Nichiren and his followers, who chant Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, are pure and clean in both body and mind.
Purity of the body is referred to in the passage in the “Benefits of the Teacher of the Law” chapter that reads, “If one upholds the Lotus Sutra / his body will be very pure.” Purity of the mind is referred to in the “Devadatta” chapter in the words “believe and revere it with pure hearts [minds].” The word “purity” refers to the mind that has faith in the Lotus Sutra, while the words “impurity” or “lack of purity” refer to slanderers of the Law.

Point Nine, on the words “Among the four kinds of believers there were those who gave way to anger, their minds lacking in purity, and they spoke ill of him and cursed him, saying, ‘This ignorant monk.’”

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: This is a famous passage in the Lotus Sutra in which the four kinds of believers in their overbearing arrogance curse the bodhisattva Never Disparaging, calling him an “ignorant monk.” To call “ignorant” the bodhisattva who bows in obeisance to whatever persons he happens to meet is the work of the devil king of the sixth heaven.
p.155This passage of the sutra acts as a bright mirror, showing us that, now that the world has entered the Latter Day of the Law, Nichiren and his followers, who chant Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, will be slandered by being called “ignorant monks.” Without doubt, it is this very “ignorance” that gives us the capacity to embrace the Lotus Sutra.

Point Ten, on the words “when they saw that he had gained great transcendental powers, the power to preach pleasingly and eloquently, the power of great goodness and tranquility, and when they heard his preaching, they all took faith in him and willingly became his followers.”

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: The word “heard” refers to the stage of hearing the name and words of the truth, the second of the six stages of practice. In effect, this passage concerns the daimoku that [as volume ten of Words and Phrases says] is “preached in a forceful manner, though it angers them.”
The word “all” refers to the four kinds of believers who were overbearingly arrogant. The word “faith,” shin, refers to the faith or belief that is without doubt. The word “willingly,” fuku, which literally means “to submit,” indicates that one submits and gives full allegiance to the Lotus Sutra. The word zui in the compound of zuijū, which literally means “to obey and follow” and is expressed as “became his followers” in the text, means that one’s mind is dedicated to the Lotus Sutra. The word jū means that one’s body is dedicated to the Lotus Sutra.3
In effect this is saying that now Nichiren and his followers, practitioners of the Lotus Sutra who chant Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, are the bodhisattva Never Disparaging of the Latter Day of the Law.

p.156Point Eleven, on the words “Among the four kinds of believers he preached the Law with no fear in his mind.”

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: The words “four kinds of believers” refer to all the living beings in the country of Japan. The words “preached the Law” refer to Nam-myoho-renge-kyo. “With no fear in his mind” describes the manner in which Nichiren and his followers now call out Nam-myoho-renge-kyo as they perform their shakubuku practice.4

Point Twelve, on the words “The bodhisattva Never Disparaging who lived at that time—could he be unknown to you? In fact he was none other than I myself!”

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: The bodhisattva Never Disparaging is the present-day Shakyamuni Buddha. Shakyamuni Buddha is the lord of teachings of the “Life Span” chapter. And the lord of teachings of the “Life Span” chapter is we who are the practitioners of the Lotus Sutra.
This passage, then, is about us. Now Nichiren and his followers are the bodhisattva Never Disparaging.

Point Thirteen, concerning the passage “Gainer of Great Authority, at that time the four kinds of believers, the monks, nuns, laymen, and laywomen, because anger arose in their minds and they treated me with disparagement and contempt, were for two hundred million kalpas never able to encounter a Buddha, to hear the Law, or to see the community of monks. For a thousand kalpas they underwent great suffering in the Avīchi hell.”

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: This passage relates how the four kinds of believers, because they treated p.157the bodhisattva Never Disparaging with disparagement and contempt, were never able to encounter the three treasures for two hundred million kalpas, but fell into hell and underwent great suffering. But now that we have entered the Latter Day of the Law, those who treat Nichiren and his followers, who chant Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, with disparagement and contempt are even worse than those others. Those others suffered for a thousand kalpas, but these will suffer “for a countless number of kalpas” (chapter three, Simile and Parable).
The “Buddha” spoken of in this passage, the Buddha of the Latter Day of the Law, is an ordinary mortal and an ordinary priest. The “Law” is the daimoku. The “community of monks” is we practitioners of the Lotus Sutra. We may be called Buddhas, and we may also be called ordinary priests, because “to have a profound realization of the perfect principle is called being a Buddha” (from volume seven of The Profound Meaning of the Lotus Sutra). The perfect principle is the Lotus Sutra.

Point Fourteen, on the words “After they had finished paying for their offenses, they once more encountered the bodhisattva Never Disparaging, who instructed them in anuttara-samyak-sambodhi [supreme perfect enlightenment].”

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: Though people may regret their error in slandering the Lotus Sutra and take faith in and give allegiance to the teachings, if their faith is shallow, they will still have to fall into the hell of incessant suffering. This is due to the vehemence with which they earlier committed slander. But after they have been plunged into the hell of incessant suffering for a thousand kalpas and the time has come for their release, then they will meet Nichiren once again. As the sutra says, “they once more” will encounter Nichiren.

Point Fifteen, concerning the passage “Gainer of Great Authority, you should understand that this Lotus Sutra p.158richly benefits the bodhisattvas and mahāsattvas, for it can cause them to attain anuttara-samyak-sambodhi [supreme perfect enlightenment]. For this reason, after the Thus Come One has passed into extinction, the bodhisattvas and mahāsattvas should at all times accept, uphold, read, recite, explain, preach, and transcribe this sutra.”

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: The practices carried out by the bodhisattva Never Disparaging are such as are described here. And as we may see, after the Buddha has passed into extinction, one should carry out the five types of practices related to the Lotus Sutra [namely, accepting and upholding it, reading it, reciting it, explaining and preaching it, and transcribing it].
Properly speaking, the twenty-five characters beginning with the words “For this reason” apply to Nichiren and his followers in the Latter Day of the Law. Therefore the text makes a point of saying “For this reason,” and goes on to explain that what follows applies to the time “after the Thus Come One has passed into extinction.” This is done because this is one of the chapters that pertain to the transmission of the sutra.
As a rule, the passages on the transmission of the sutra are meant for people of the present and the future. In a sense, the entire Lotus Sutra was preached for the sake of people who lived when the Buddha was in the world. But in a strict sense, it was meant for people of the present time, the Latter Day of the Law. Therefore the five characters of Myoho-renge-kyo have been approved jointly by all the Buddhas of the three existences as something that is meant for people living in a future time “after the Thus Come One has passed into extinction.”
All the doctrines set forth in the various different chapters of the sutra are functions or applications of the daimoku, or title, of the sutra. For if [the daimoku of] the Wonderful Law that is the entity is meant to be applied in the Latter Day of the Law, then how could the same not apply to the various individual chapters? But this doctrine should be kept secret.
p.159The Great Teacher T’ien-t’ai explains this idea by saying, “When one pulls on the main cord of a net, there are no meshes that do not move” (from volume one of Profound Meaning). And the Great Teacher Miao-lo says, “When for the sake of brevity one mentions only the daimoku, or title, the entire sutra is by implication included therein” (from volume eight of The Annotations on “The Words and Phrases of the Lotus Sutra”).
Those who do not understand this are not qualified to propagate [the sutra] in the Latter Day of the Law.

Point Sixteen, concerning the true entity exemplified by the bodhisattva Never Disparaging as he is depicted here in this chapter

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: The bodhisattva Never Disparaging represents the living beings of the Ten Worlds. Constantly throughout the three existences he carries out his practice of bowing in obeisance. And the words that issue from his mouth are the sounds of the Wonderful Law.
Even when the wardens of hell take up their clubs and berate offenders, [the offenders submit to the berating and so] their true entity is a kind of bow of obeisance. They would not dare to respond out of mere disparagement. If the offenders suppose that the wardens are punishing them unjustly, then in turn they are unjustly berating the bodhisattva Never Disparaging. This is what is meant by the practice of shakubuku.

Point Seventeen, concerning the various positions or standpoints from which the bodhisattva Never Disparaging’s bow of obeisance is carried out
There are fourteen such positions from which the bow of obeisance is conducted.

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: The first position is that represented by the bow of obeisance carried out in the treasure tower. This is because the stupa or tower is composed of the five elements. The five elements are earth, water, p.160fire, wind, and space. The stupa made of these is known as the treasure tower.
Vast as the Dharma-realm is, it is composed of nothing more than these five elements. Therefore it has been taught that the bow of obeisance is carried out within the treasure tower. Treat this as secret, treat this as secret.

Point Eighteen, concerning the bow of obeisance based on the passage on opening, showing, awakening, and causing to enter (chapter two, Expedient Means)

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: Another place where the bow of obeisance is conducted is the passage that tells how the Buddhas wish for the sake of all living beings to carry out four actions, namely, to “open, show, awaken, and cause them to enter” the Buddha wisdom. This passage in the “Expedient Means” chapter therefore represents the second place where the bow of obeisance is carried out.
[In his Words and Phrases, volume ten, T’ien-t’ai] interprets this to mean that within one’s heart one possesses the understanding of the bodhisattva Never Disparaging. He interprets this understanding to mean the understanding that all living beings possess innate Buddhahood. To open up the Buddha nature that is innate in them, the Buddhas appear in the world. This is what the sutra means when it says, “To open the door of Buddha wisdom to all living beings” (chapter two, Expedient Means).

Point Nineteen, concerning the bow of obeisance related to the passage “At all times I think to myself: / How can I cause living beings / to gain entry into the unsurpassed way / and quickly acquire the body of a Buddha?” (chapter sixteen, Life Span).

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: The words “at all times” refer to the three existences. The word “think” indicates that the Buddha thinks of the Buddha nature inherent in all living beings. Consequently, the idea expressed in the words p.161“quickly acquire the body of a Buddha” is the same as that expressed in the words [of Bodhisattva Never Disparaging] “you are all certain to attain Buddhahood.” Hence this passage has been taken to represent the bodhisattva Never Disparaging’s bow of obeisance.
The Great Teacher T’ien-t’ai interprets it [in his Words and Phrases, volume ten] as “the replacement of the three vehicles with the one vehicle,” and as “the opening of the near and the revealing of the distant.” Treat this matter as secret. Treat it as secret.

Point Twenty, concerning the bow of obeisance related to the words “Originally I practiced the bodhisattva way” (chapter sixteen, Life Span).

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: The word “I” here refers to Shakyamuni Buddha when he was carrying out the true cause of his original enlightenment. This passage concerning how the Buddha “originally practiced the bodhisattva way” refers to the practice of the bodhisattva Never Disparaging [who was reborn as Shakyamuni]. Hence it indicates a place where the bow of obeisance is carried out.

Point Twenty-one, concerning the bow of obeisance related to the words “birth, aging, sickness, and death”

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: Living beings as a whole fail to free themselves from the sufferings of birth, aging, sickness, and death, but continue to wander deludedly in impermanence, change, and extinction. Therefore they fail to realize that they are capable of achieving enlightenment in a future existence. But when they come to realize this fact, then they will understand the doctrine that earthly desires are enlightenment and the sufferings of birth and death are nirvana. And when they do so, the person who has taught them has performed a bow of obeisance to them.
When the left and right hands of the bower are held apart, this p.162symbolizes the fact that earthly desires [and enlightenment], the sufferings of birth and death [and nirvana], and the four kinds of believers of overbearing arrogance and the bodhisattva Never Disparaging are all quite separate entities. But when the two hands are brought together in a bow of obeisance, this symbolizes the fact that earthly desires are enlightenment, and that the sufferings of birth and death are nirvana. Then a bow of obeisance is performed to the fact that the Buddha nature inherent in the four kinds of believers of overbearing arrogance and the Buddha nature inherent in the bodhisattva Never Disparaging are both manifestations of the single Wonderful Law.

Point Twenty-two, concerning the bow of obeisance related to the Dharma nature

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: The bodhisattva Never Disparaging plants his feet firmly on the three inherent potentials of the Buddha nature that represent the Dharma nature and the true aspect of reality, namely, Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, [the heart of] the twenty-four characters [that make up the passage reading, “I have profound reverence for you, I would never dare treat you with disparagement or arrogance. Why? Because you are all practicing the bodhisattva way and are certain to attain Buddhahood” (chapter twenty)]. And then he bows to the four kinds of believers who in their ignorance are overbearingly arrogant. In doing so, he is performing a bow of obeisance to the Buddha nature dormant and undeveloped in living beings.

Point Twenty-three, concerning the bow of obeisance related to ignorance

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: When one sets up distinctions between self and others, then the “others” are the four kinds of believers of overbearing arrogance, and the “I” is the bodhisattva Never Disparaging. To set up distinctions between good and bad by regarding the bodhisattva Never p.163Disparaging as a “good” person and the arrogant ones as “bad” persons is a sign of ignorance.
But when one recognizes this and performs a bow of obeisance, then one is bowing in obeisance to Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, the principle in which good and bad are not two different things, in which correct and incorrect are one and the same.

Point Twenty-four, concerning the bow of obeisance related to the two characters that make up renge, or lotus blossom

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: Renge stands for the two factors of cause and effect. Where there is a bad cause, it will produce a bad effect; where there is a good cause, it will produce a good effect. The persons addressed by the bodhisattva Never Disparaging in their inner lives possess good causes that represent the three inherent potentials of the Buddha nature. When these potentials are actualized, they will produce good effects, which is why the bodhisattva bows to these persons in obeisance and declares that they are “all certain to attain Buddhahood” (chapter twenty).

Point Twenty-five, concerning the bow of obeisance related to the Land of Actual Reward

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: When the Ten Worlds are considered in ascending order, the Land of Actual Reward corresponds to the ninth world, that of the bodhisattva. Accordingly, we know that the Land of Actual Reward is where the bodhisattva Never Disparaging dwells. Because he performs a bow of obeisance there, it is known as the bow of obeisance related to the Land of Actual Reward.

Point Twenty-six, concerning the bow of obeisance related to the two words “pity” and “compassion” (jihi)

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: The practice of making a bow of obeisance carried out by the bodhisattva Never Disparaging is based on the teaching that the people he p.164bowed to were “all certain to attain Buddhahood” (chapter twenty) and therefore is an expression of pity and compassion. Hence, although the people might “take sticks of wood or tiles and stones and beat and pelt him” (ibid.), he nevertheless persisted in his effort, “preaching to them forcefully, though it angered them” (Words and Phrases, volume ten), an action that arose from his feelings of pity and compassion.
Since we are taught that the Buddha mind is a mind of great pity and compassion, a bow of obeisance is made in acknowledgment of this pity and compassion.

Point Twenty-seven, concerning the bow of obeisance related to the stage of progressive awakening, the fifth of the six stages of practice

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: The bodhisattva is regarded as occupying the stage of progressive awakening. From this vantage point he performs a bow of obeisance to ordinary mortals who are in the first and lowest stage, that of being a Buddha in theory. Because of this disparity in their respective positions, the ordinary mortals in the stage of being a Buddha in theory fail to accept the bodhisattva’s prediction that they will attain Buddhahood but instead slander him by calling him “this ignorant monk” (chapter twenty).

Point Twenty-eight, concerning the bow of obeisance related to the stage of ultimate enlightenment, the sixth and highest stage of practice

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: In the phrase “whatever persons he happened to meet” or to see (chapter twenty), the word ken, to “meet” or to “see,” refers to the insight of a Buddha. Because the bodhisattva Never Disparaging, employing the insight of a Buddha, performed a bow of obeisance to the four kinds of believers of overbearing arrogance, it is considered that he performed a bow of obeisance from the standpoint of the stage of ultimate enlightenment.

p.165Point Twenty-nine, concerning the bow of obeisance related to the Dharma-realm

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: The bodhisattva Never Disparaging makes a bow of obeisance from the standpoint of the Dharma-realm. The Dharma-realm is neither broad, nor is it narrow. Essentially, the word “Dharma” of the Dharma-realm stands for all the dharmas, or elements of the phenomenal world, and the word “realm” is the world or state of life in which they dwell.
Each realm or world, from the realm of hell to the state of Buddhahood, has its own patterns or rules (dharmas). Thus, the bodhisattva Never Disparaging conforms to the rules of the realm of the bodhisattva Never Disparaging, while the four kinds of believers of overbearing arrogance conform to the rules of the realm of the four kinds of believers. In this sense, the Dharma-realm makes a bow of obeisance to the Dharma-realm,5 a bow of obeisance acknowledging the fact that “self” and “others” are in fact not two different things.
For this reason, when the bodhisattva Never Disparaging makes his bow of obeisance to the four kinds of believers, the Buddha nature inherent in the four kinds of believers of overbearing arrogance bows in obeisance to the bodhisattva Never Disparaging. It is like the situation when one faces a mirror and makes a bow of obeisance: the image in the mirror likewise makes a bow of obeisance to oneself.

Point Thirty, concerning the bow of obeisance related to the attitude of forbearance

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: We are told p.166that the four kinds of believers of overbearing arrogance in their anger cursed and abused the bodhisattva Never Disparaging, and that they slandered him further by calling his predictions that they would attain Buddhahood “vain and irresponsible” (chapter twenty). But after all that, it is said that the bodhisattva “did not give way to anger” (ibid.). Hence we know that he maintained an attitude of forbearance and from that position performed a bow of obeisance.
Of these fourteen positions from which the bow of obeisance is conducted, the first is known to the ordinary run of teachers. But the remaining thirteen are not known to the teachers of our present age.
This concludes the explanation of the fourteen standpoints from which the bow of obeisance is conducted.
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Notes

1. They are the innate Buddha nature, the wisdom to perceive it, and the good deeds, or Buddhist practice, to develop this wisdom and cause the Buddha nature to emerge. Good deeds aid the development of wisdom, and the developed wisdom realizes the innate Buddha nature. These three causes interact to enable one to attain Buddhahood.
2. In The Lotus Sutra (trans. Burton Watson, Columbia University Press, 1993), on page 31, the paragraphs from the second through the fourth describe the above four factors. The “teaching” refers to the passage “The Thus Come Ones have only a single Buddha vehicle which they employ in order to preach the Law to living beings. They do not have any other vehicle, a second one or a third one.” The “practice” refers to the passage “All the things they do are at all times done for this one purpose. They simply wish to show the Buddha wisdom to living beings and enlighten them to it.” The “person” refers to the passage “The Buddhas, the Thus Come Ones, simply teach and convert the bodhisattvas.” The “principle” refers to the passage on enlightening living beings to the principle [of the Wonderful Law] through the four actions of opening, showing, awakening, and causing living beings to enter the Buddha wisdom.
3. This paragraph explains the four words that comprise the passage “[they all] took faith in him and willingly became his followers” (shimpuku-zuijū). The four words—shin or shim (believe), fuku or puku (submit), zui (obey), and jū (follow)—make up shimpuku-zuijū.
4. “Shakubuku” is the Buddhist method of leading people, particularly its opponents, to the correct teaching by refuting their erroneous views. In Nichiren’s teaching it means to correct another’s mistaken views and awaken that person to Nam-myoho-renge-kyo.
5. Here the Chinese characters for the dharma and for the realm are used to make up “the Dharma-realm” and “conforming to the rules of the realm.” When the text says, “The Dharma-realm makes a bow of obeisance to the Dharma-realm,” it means, respectively, the Dharma-realm (that is, the state of conforming to the rules of the realm) of the bodhisattva Never Disparaging and the Dharma-realm of the four kinds of believers. Then this is described as the nonduality of “self” and “others.”
Nam-myoho-renge-kyo

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings (Ongi kuden) says: Namu or nam is a Sanskrit word. Here it means to dedicate one’s life, that is, to the Person and to the Law. In terms of the Person, one dedicates one’s life to Shakyamuni Buddha; in terms of the Law, one dedicates one’s life to the Lotus Sutra. “Dedication” means dedication to the principle of eternal and unchanging truth of the theoretical teaching, and “life” means that one’s life dedicated to that principle bases itself on the wisdom of the truth of the essential teaching that functions in accordance with changing circumstances. In essence, one dedicates one’s life to Nam-myoho-renge-kyo.

A commentary [by Dengyō] says, “That which accords with changing circumstances, that which is unchanging, these are tranquil and shining in a single moment of life.”
Again, “dedication” refers to the element of physical form as it pertains to us, while “life” refers to the element of mind as it pertains to us. But the ultimate teaching tells us that form and mind are not two things. As a commentary [The Annotations on “The Profound Meaning of the Lotus Sutra,” volume one] says, “Because [the Lotus Sutra] leads us to the ultimate truth, it is called the Buddha vehicle.”
We may also note that the nam[u] of Nam-myoho-renge-kyo is a Sanskrit word, while myōhō, renge, and kyō are Chinese words.1 p.4Sanskrit and Chinese join in a single moment to form Nam-myoho-renge-kyo. If we express the title in Sanskrit, it will be Saddharma-pundarīka-sūtram. This is Myoho-renge-kyo in Sanskrit. Sad (the phonetic change of sat) means myō, or wonderful. Dharma means hō, Law or phenomena. Pundarīka means renge, or lotus blossom. Sūtram means kyō, or sutra. The nine characters [that represent the Sanskrit title] are the Buddha bodies of the nine honored ones. This expresses the idea that the nine worlds are inseparable from the Buddha world.
Myō stands for the Dharma nature or enlightenment, while hō represents darkness or ignorance. Together myōhō expresses the idea that ignorance and the Dharma nature are a single entity. Renge stands for the two elements of cause and effect. Cause and effect are also a single entity.
Kyō represents the words and voices of all living beings. A commentary [On “The Profound Meaning,” volume one] says, “The voice carries out the work of the Buddha, and this is called kyō, or sutra.” Kyō may also be defined as that which is constant and unchanging in the three existences of past, present, and future. The Dharma-realm is myōhō, the Wonderful Law; the Dharma-realm is renge, the lotus blossom; the Dharma-realm is kyō, the sutra.
Renge, the lotus blossom, is the Buddha bodies of the nine honored ones seated on the eight-petaled lotus. Think all this over very carefully.
The Record says:

In the “Introduction” chapter, seven important points
In the “Expedient Means” chapter, eight important points
In the “Simile and Parable” chapter, nine important points
In the “Belief and Understanding” chapter, six important points
In “The Parable of the Medicinal Herbs” chapter, five important points
In the “Bestowal of Prophecy” chapter, four important points
p.5In “The Parable of the Phantom City” chapter, seven important points
In the “Prophecy of Enlightenment for Five Hundred Disciples” chapter, three important points
In the “Prophecies Conferred on Learners and Adepts” chapter, two important points
In “The Teacher of the Law” chapter, sixteen important points
In “The Emergence of the Treasure Tower” chapter, twenty important points
In the “Devadatta” chapter, eight important points
In the “Encouraging Devotion” chapter, thirteen important points
In the “Peaceful Practices” chapter, five important points
In the “Emerging from the Earth” chapter, one important point
In “The Life Span of the Thus Come One” chapter, twenty-seven important points
In the “Distinctions in Benefits” chapter, three important points
In “The Benefits of Responding with Joy” chapter, two important points
In the “Benefits of the Teacher of the Law” chapter, four important points
In “The Bodhisattva Never Disparaging” chapter, thirty important points
In the “Supernatural Powers of the Thus Come One” chapter, eight important points
In the “Entrustment” chapter, three important points
In the “Former Affairs of the Bodhisattva Medicine King” chapter, six important points
In “The Bodhisattva Wonderful Sound” chapter, three important points
In “The Universal Gateway of the Bodhisattva Perceiver of the World’s Sounds” chapter, five important points
In the “Dhāranī” chapter, six important points
In the “Former Affairs of King Wonderful Adornment” chapter, three important points
In the “Encouragements of the Bodhisattva Universal Worthy” chapter, six important points
p.6In the Immeasurable Meanings Sutra, six important points
In the Universal Worthy Sutra, five important points

This comes to a total of 231 items. In addition, there is the separate transmission. All these have been recorded in full.
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Notes

1. Namu or its phonetic change nam derives from the Sanskrit namas. Myoho-renge-kyo is the Japanese transliteration of the Chinese Miao-fa-lien-hua-ching.
CHAPTER 20

The Bodhisattva Never Disparaging

At that time the Buddha said to the bodhisattva mahasattva Gainer of Great Authority: “You should understand this. When monks, nuns, laymen, or laywomen uphold the Lotus Sutra, if anyone should speak ill of them, curse, or slander them, he will suffer severe recompense for his crime, as I have explained earlier. And I have also explained earlier the benefits gained by those who uphold the sutra, namely, purification of their eyes, ears, nose, tongue, body, and mind.
“Gainer of Great Authority, long ago, an immeasurable, boundless, inconceivable number of asamkhya kalpas in the past, there was a buddha named Awesome Sound King Thus Come One, worthy of offerings, of right and universal knowledge, perfect clarity and conduct, well gone, understanding the world, unexcelled worthy, trainer of people, teacher of heavenly and human beings, buddha, world-honored one. His kalpa was called Exempt from Decay and his land was called Great Achievement.
“This buddha Awesome Sound King during the age when he lived preached the Law for heavenly and human beings and asuras. For those who were seeking to become voice-hearers he responded by preaching the doctrine of the four noble truths so that they could transcend birth, aging, sickness, and death and eventually attain nirvana. For those seeking to become pratyekabuddhas he responded by preaching the doctrine of the twelve-linked chain of causation. For the bodhisattvas, as a means to p.308lead them to supreme perfect enlightenment, he responded by preaching the doctrine of the six paramitas so that they could eventually gain the buddha wisdom.
“Gainer of Great Authority, this buddha Awesome Sound King had a life span of kalpas equal to the sands of four hundred thousand million nayutas of Ganges Rivers. His Correct Law endured in the world for as many kalpas as there are dust particles in one Jambudvipa. His Counterfeit Law endured in the world for as many kalpas as there are dust particles in the four continents. After this buddha had finished bringing great benefit to living beings, he passed into extinction.
“After his Correct Law and Counterfeit Law had come to an end, another buddha appeared in the same land. He too was named Awesome Sound King Thus Come One, worthy of offerings, of right and universal knowledge, perfect clarity and conduct, well gone, understanding the world, unexcelled worthy, trainer of people, teacher of heavenly and human beings, buddha, world-honored one. This process continued until twenty thousand million buddhas had appeared one after the other, all bearing the same name.
“After the original Awesome Sound King Thus Come One had passed into extinction, and after his Correct Law had also passed away, in the period of his Counterfeit Law, monks of overbearing arrogance exercised great authority and power. At this time there was a bodhisattva monk named Never Disparaging. Now, Gainer of Great Authority, for what reason was he named Never Disparaging? This monk, whatever persons he happened to meet, whether monks, nuns, laymen, or laywomen, would bow in obeisance to all of them and speak words of praise, saying, ‘I have profound reverence for you, I would never dare treat you with disparagement or arrogance. Why? Because you will all practice the bodhisattva way and will then be able to attain buddhahood.’
“This monk did not devote his time to reading or reciting the scriptures, but simply went about bowing to people. And if he happened to see any of the four kinds of believers far off in the p.309distance, he would purposely go to where they were, bow to them, and speak words of praise, saying, ‘I would never dare disparage you, because you are all certain to attain buddhahood!’
“Among the four kinds of believers there were those who gave way to anger, their minds lacking in purity, and they spoke ill of him and cursed him, saying, ‘This ignorant monk—where does he come from, presuming to declare that he does not disparage us and bestowing on us a prediction that we will attain buddhahood? We have no use for such vain and irresponsible predictions!’
“Many years passed in this way, during which this monk was constantly subjected to curses and abuse. He did not give way to anger, however, but each time spoke the same words, ‘You are certain to attain buddhahood.’ When he spoke in this manner, some among the group would take sticks of wood or tiles and stones and beat and pelt him. But even as he ran away and took up his stance at a distance, he continued to call out in a loud voice, ‘I would never dare disparage you, for you are all certain to attain buddhahood!’ And because he always spoke these words, the overbearingly arrogant monks, nuns, laymen, and laywomen gave him the name Never Disparaging.
“When this monk was on the point of death, he heard up in the sky fully twenty thousand, ten thousand, a million verses of the Lotus Sutra that had previously been preached by the buddha Awesome Sound King, and he was able to accept and uphold them all. Immediately he gained the kind of purity of vision and purity of the faculties of the ear, nose, tongue, body, and mind that have been described above. Having gained this purity of the six faculties, his life span was increased by two hundred ten thousand million nayutas of years, and he went about widely preaching the Lotus Sutra for people.
“At that time, when the four kinds of believers who were overbearingly arrogant, the monks, nuns, laymen, and laywomen who had looked with contempt on this monk and given him the name Never Disparaging—when they saw that he had gained great transcendental powers, the power to preach pleasingly and p.310eloquently, the power of great goodness and tranquillity, and when they heard his preaching, they all took faith in him and willingly became his followers.
“This bodhisattva converted a multitude of a thousand, ten thousand, a million, causing them to abide in the state of supreme perfect enlightenment. After his life came to an end, he was able to encounter two thousand million buddhas, all bearing the name Sun Moon Bright, and in the midst of their Law he preached this Lotus Sutra. Through the causes and conditions created thereby, he was also able to encounter two thousand million buddhas, all with the identical name Cloud Freedom Lamp King. In the midst of the Law of these buddhas, he accepted, upheld, read, recited, and preached this sutra for the four kinds of believers. For that reason he was able to gain purification of his ordinary eyes, and the faculties of his ears, nose, tongue, body, and mind were likewise purified. Among the four kinds of believers he preached the Law with no fear in his mind.
“Gainer of Great Authority, this bodhisattva mahasattva Never Disparaging in this manner offered alms to a vast number of buddhas, treating them with reverence and honor and praising them. Having planted these good roots, he was later able to encounter a thousand, ten thousand, a million buddhas, and in the midst of the Law of these buddhas, he preached this sutra, gaining benefits that allowed him to attain buddhahood.
“Gainer of Great Authority, what do you think? The bodhisattva Never Disparaging who lived at that time—could he be unknown to you? In fact he was none other than I myself! If in my previous existences I had not accepted, upheld, read, and recited this sutra and preached it for others, I would never have been able to attain supreme perfect enlightenment this quickly. Because in the presence of those earlier buddhas I accepted, upheld, read, and recited this sutra and preached it for others, I was able quickly to attain supreme perfect enlightenment.
“Gainer of Great Authority, at that time the four kinds of believers, the monks, nuns, laymen, and laywomen, because anger arose in their minds and they treated me with disparagement and contempt, were for two hundred million kalpas never p.311able to encounter a buddha, to hear the Law, or to see the community of monks. For a thousand kalpas they underwent great suffering in the Avichi hell. After they had finished paying for their offenses, they once more encountered the bodhisattva Never Disparaging, who instructed them in supreme perfect enlightenment.
“Gainer of Great Authority, what do you think? The four kinds of believers who at that time constantly disparaged this bodhisattva—could they be unknown to you? They are in this assembly now, Bhadrapala and his group, five hundred bodhisattvas; Lion Moon and her group, five hundred nuns; and Thinking of Buddha and his group, five hundred laymen, all having reached the state where they will never regress in their search for supreme perfect enlightenment!
“Gainer of Great Authority, you should understand that this Lotus Sutra richly benefits the bodhisattvas mahasattva, for it can cause them to attain supreme perfect enlightenment. For this reason, after the thus come one has passed into extinction, the bodhisattvas mahasattva should at all times accept, uphold, read, recite, explain, preach, and transcribe this sutra.”
At that time the world-honored one, wishing to state his meaning once more, spoke in verse form, saying:

In the past there was a buddha
named Awesome Sound King,
of immeasurable supernatural powers and wisdom,
leading and guiding one and all.
Heavenly beings, human beings, dragons
joined in offering him alms.
After this buddha had entered extinction,
when his Law was about to expire,
there was a bodhisattva
named Never Disparaging.
The four kinds of believers at that time
scrutinized and adhered to the doctrines.
The bodhisattva Never Disparaging
would go to where they were
p.312and speak to them, saying,
“I would never disparage you,
for you will practice the way
and all of you will become buddhas!”
When the people heard this,
they gibed at him, cursed, and reviled him,
but the bodhisattva Never Disparaging
bore all this with patience.
When his offenses had been wiped out
and his life was drawing to a close,
he was able to hear this sutra
and his six faculties were purified.
Because of his transcendental powers
his life span was extended,
and for the sake of others
he preached this sutra far and wide.
The many people who adhered to the doctrines
all received teaching and conversion
from this bodhisattva,
who caused them to dwell in the buddha way.
When Never Disparaging’s life ended,
he encountered numberless buddhas,
and because he preached this sutra
he gained immeasurable blessings.
Bit by bit he had acquired merit
and quickly completed the buddha way.
Never Disparaging, who lived at that time,
was none other than myself.
And the four kinds of believers
who adhered to the doctrines then,
who heard Never Disparaging say,
“You will become buddhas!”
and through the causes thus created
encountered numberless buddhas—
they are here in this assembly,
a group of five hundred bodhisattvas,
and the four kinds of believers,
p.313men and women of pure faith
who now in my presence
listen to the Law.
In previous existences
I encouraged these persons
to listen to and accept this sutra,
the foremost in all the teachings,
unfolding it, teaching people,
and causing them to dwell in nirvana.
So in age after age they accepted and upheld
scriptures of this kind.
A million million ten thousand kalpas,
an inconceivable time will pass
before at last one can hear
this Lotus Sutra.
A million million ten thousand kalpas,
an inconceivable time will pass
before the buddhas, world-honored ones,
preach this sutra.
Therefore its practitioners,
after the Buddha has entered extinction,
when they hear a sutra like this
should entertain no doubts or perplexities
but should with a single mind
preach this sutra far and wide,
age after age encountering buddhas
and quickly completing the buddha way.
“T” is the 20th letter in the SOKA GAKKAI DICTIONARY OF BUDDHISM:
Ta-hsing-shan-ssu[大興善寺] (PY Daxingshansi; Jpn Daikōzen-ji)
Taiseki-ji[大石寺]
Taishaku[帝釈] (Jpn)
Takahashi Rokurō Hyōe, the lay priest[高橋六郎兵衛入道] (n.d.) (Jpn Takahashi Rokurō Hyōe-nyūdō)
Takshashilā[徳叉尸羅] (Skt; Jpn Tokushashira)
tāla tree[多羅樹] (Skt; Jpn tara-ju)
Tamāla Leaf Sandalwood Fragrance[多摩羅跋栴檀香如来] (Skt Tamālapattra-chandana-gandha or Tamālapatra-chandana-gandha; Jpn Tamarabatsu-sendankō-nyorai or Tamaraba-sendankō-nyorai)
Tamon-ten[多聞天] (Jpn)
T’ang Dynasty Biographies of Eminent Priests, The[唐高僧伝] (Jpn Tō-kōsō-den)
T’an-luan[曇鸞] (476–542) (PY Tanluan; Jpn Donran)
Tantric Buddhism[タントラ仏教] (Jpn Tantora-bukkyō)
T’an-yao[曇曜] (n.d.) (PY Tanyao; Jpn Don’yō)
Tao-an[道安] (PY Daoan; Jpn Dōan) (1) (312–385); (2) (n.d.)
Tao-ch’o[道綽] (562–645) (PY Daochuo; Jpn Dōshaku)
Tao-hsien[道暹] (n.d.) (PY Daoxian; Jpn Dōsen)
Tao-hsin[道信] (580–651) (PY Daoxin; Jpn Dōshin)
Tao-hsüan(PY Daoxuan) (1) [道宣] (596–667) (Jpn Dōsen); (2) [道璿] (Jpn Dōsen)
Tao-sheng[道生・竺道生] (d. 434) (PY Daosheng; Jpn Dōshō or Jiku-dōshō)
Tao-sui[道邃] (n.d.) (PY Daosui; Jpn Dōsui or Dōzui)
Tarim Basin[タリム盆地] (Jpn Tarimu-bonchi)
tathāgata[如来] (Skt, Pali; Jpn nyorai)
tathatā[真如・如如] (Skt, Pali; Jpn shinnyo or nyonyo)
Tatsunokuchi Persecution[竜の口の法難] (Jpn Tatsunokuchi-no-hōnan)
Ta-tz’u-en-ssu[大慈恩寺] (PY Daciensi; Jpn Daijion-ji)
Taxila[タクシラ] (Jpn Takushira)
teacherless wisdom[無師智] (Jpn mushi-chi)
Teacher of Heavenly and Human Beings[天人師] (Skt shāstā-deva-manushyānām; Jpn tennin-shi)
“Teacher of the Law” chapter[法師品] (Jpn Hosshi-hon)
teacher of the nation[国師] (Jpn kokushi)
teacher of the true cause[本因妙の教主] (Jpn honnin-myō-no-kyōshu)
teacher of the true effect[本果妙の教主] (Jpn honga-myō-no-kyōshu)
teaching of gleaning[捃拾教] (Jpn kunjū-kyō)
teaching, practice, and proof[教行証] (Jpn kyō-gyō-shō)
Teaching, Practice, Faith, and Proof, The[教行信証] (Jpn Kyō-gyō-shin-shō)
teachings of the three periods[三時教] (Jpn sanji-kyō)
teaching that unites the branch teaching with the root teaching[摂末帰本法輪] (Jpn shōmatsu-kihon-hōrin)
Temple school[寺門派] (Jpn Jimon-ha)
ten analogies[十喩] (Jpn jū-yu)
ten comparisons[十喩] (Jpn jū-yu)
Tendai Esotericism[台密] (Jpn Taimitsu)
Tendai Hokke school[天台法華宗] (Jpn Tendai Hokke-shū)
Tendai Lotus school[天台法華宗] (Jpn Tendai Hokke-shū)
Tendai school[天台宗] (Jpn Tendai-shū)
ten demon daughters[十羅刹女] (Jpn jū-rasetsu-nyo)
ten directions[十方] (Jpn jippō)
Ten Divisions of Monastic Rules, The[十誦律] (Chin Shih-sung-lü; Jpn Jūju-ritsu)
ten doctrines[十宗] (Jpn jisshū)
ten evil acts[十悪] (Jpn jū-aku)
ten factors of life[十如是] (Jpn jū-nyoze)
ten good acts[十善] (Jpn jū-zen)
ten good precepts[十善戒] (Jpn jū-zen-kai)
ten great scholars of the Consciousness-Only school[唯識十大論師] (Jpn yuishiki-jūdai-ronji)
ten honorable titles[十号] (Jpn jū-gō)
ten kinds of offerings[十種供養] (Jpn jisshu-kuyō)
ten kings[十王] (Jpn jū-ō)
ten major disciples[十大弟子] (Jpn jūdai-deshi)
ten major precepts[十重禁戒] (Jpn ju-jūkinkai)
ten major writings[十大部] (Jpn jūdai-bu)
ten meditations[十乗観法] (Jpn jūjō-kampō)
ten mysteries[十玄門] (Jpn jū-gemmon)
ten mystic principles[十妙] (Jpn jū-myō)
ten objects[十境] (Jpn jikkyō)
ten onenesses[十不二門] (Jpn jippunimon)
Ten Onenesses, The[十不二門] (Chin Shih-pu-erh-men; Jpn Jippunimon)
ten pāramitās[十波羅蜜] (Jpn jū-haramitsu or jipparamitsu)
ten peerlessnesses[十無上] (Jpn jū-mujō)
ten powers[十力] (Jpn jū-riki)
ten precepts[十戒] (Jpn jikkai)
ten rākshasa daughters[十羅刹女] (Jpn jū-rasetsu-nyo)
ten schools[十宗] (Jpn jisshū)
Tenshō Daijin[天照大神] (Jpn)
ten similes[十喩] (Jpn jū-yu)
ten stages of development[十地] (Skt dashabhūmi; Jpn jū-ji)
ten stages of devotion[十廻向] (Jpn jū-ekō)
ten stages of faith[十信] (Jpn jisshin)
ten stages of practice[十行] (Jpn jū-gyō)
ten stages of security[十住] (Jpn jū-jū)
ten stages of the mind[十住心] (Jpn jū-jūshin)
Ten Stages Sutra[十地経] (Skt Dashabhūmika-sūtra; Chin Shih-ti-ching; Jpn Jūji-kyō)
ten supernatural powers[十神力] (Jpn jū-jinriki)
ten unlawful revisions[十事の非法] (Jpn jūji-no-hihō)
Ten Worlds[十界] (Jpn jikkai)
theoretical teaching[迹門] (Jpn shakumon)
Theravāda school[上座部] (Pali; Skt Sthaviravāda; Jpn Jōza-bu)
third doctrine[第三の法門] (Jpn daisan-no-hōmon)
third group of the listeners of Great Universal Wisdom Excellence Buddha’s teaching[大通結縁の第三類] (Jpn Daitsū-kechien-no-daisanrui)
thirteen major prohibitions[十三僧残] (Jpn jūsan-sōzan)
thirteen schools of China[中国十三宗] (Jpn Chūgoku-jūsan-shū)
thirty-four forms[三十四身] (Jpn sanjūshi-shin)
thirty-seven aids to the way[三十七道品] (Jpn sanjūshichi-dōhon)
Thirty-Stanza Treatise on the Consciousness-Only Doctrine, The[唯識三十論頌] (Skt Trimshikā-vijnaptimātratā-siddhi; Chin Wei-shih-san-shih-lun-sung; Jpn Yuishiki-sanjū-ron-ju)
thirty-three forms[三十三身] (Jpn sanjūsan-shin)
thirty-three gods[三十三天] (Jpn sanjūsan-ten)
thirty-two features[三十二相] (Jpn sanjūni-sō)
thirty-two features and eighty characteristics[三十二相八十種好] (Jpn sanjūni-sō-hachijisshugō)
“This is what I heard”[如是我聞] (Skt evam mayā shrutam; Jpn nyoze-gamon)
Thousand-armed Perceiver of the World’s Sounds[千手観音] (Skt Sahasrabhuja; Jpn Senju-kannon)
thousand-millionfold world[三千大千世界] (Jpn sanzen-daisen-sekai)
thousand-spoked wheel[千輻輪相] (Jpn sempukurin-sō)
three asamkhya kalpas and a hundred major kalpas[三祇百大劫] (Jpn sangi-hyakudai-kō)
three ascetics[三仙] (Jpn san-sen)
three assemblies in two places[二処三会] (Jpn nisho-sanne)
three benefits[三益] (Jpn san-yaku)
three bodies[三身] (Skt trikāya; Jpn san-jin)
three calamities[三災] (Jpn san-sai)
three calamities and seven disasters[三災七難] (Jpn sansai-shichinan)
three cardinal sins[三逆・三逆罪] (Jpn san-gyaku or san-gyakuzai)
three categories of action[三業] (Jpn san-gō)
three categories of illusion[三惑] (Jpn san-waku)
three categories of preaching[已今当・三説] (Jpn i-kon-tō or san-setsu)
three circles[三輪] (Jpn san-rin)
three comprehensive precepts[三聚浄戒] (Jpn sanju-jō-kai)
three cycles of preaching[三周の説法] (Jpn sanshū-no-seppō)
three Dharma seals[三法印] (Jpn sambōin)
three divisions of a sutra[三分科経] (Jpn sambunka-kyō)
three divisions of the canon[三蔵] (Skt tripitaka; Pali tipitaka; Jpn san-zō)
three equalities[三平等] (Jpn san-byōdō)
three evil paths[三悪道・三悪趣] (Jpn san-akudō or san-akushu)
three exhortations and four entreaties[三誡四請] (Jpn sankai-shishō)
three existences[三世] (Jpn san-ze)
three expedient means[三方便] (Jpn san-hōben)
threefold contemplation in a single mind[一心三観] (Jpn isshin-sangan)
threefold Lotus Sutra[法華三部経] (Jpn Hokke-sambu-kyō)
threefold refuge[三帰・三帰依・三帰戒] (Jpn san-ki, san-kie, or san-kikai)
threefold refuge and observance of the five precepts[三帰五戒] (Jpn sanki-gokai)
threefold secret teaching[三重秘伝] (Jpn sanjū-hiden)
threefold world[三界] (Jpn san-gai)
three gates to emancipation[三解脱門] (Jpn san-gedatsu-mon)
three good paths[三善道] (Jpn san-zendō)
Three Great Secret Laws[三大秘法] (Jpn sandai-hihō)
three groups of voice-hearers[三周の声聞] (Jpn sanshū-no-shōmon)
three heavenly sons of light[三光天子] (Jpn sankō-tenshi)
three illusions[三惑] (Jpn san-waku)
three inherent potentials of the Buddha nature[三因仏性] (Jpn san’in-busshō)
three insights[三明] (Jpn san-myō)
three insights and six transcendental powers[三明六通] (Jpn sammyō-rokutsū)
three kalpas[三劫] (Jpn san-kō)
three Kāshyapa brothers[三迦葉] (Jpn san-kashō)
three kinds of mind[三心] (Jpn san-jin)
three kinds of non-regression[三不退] (Jpn san-futai)
three kinds of offerings[三施] (Jpn san-se)
three kinds of tranquillity[三念住・三念処] (Jpn san-nenjū or san-nenjo)
three kinds of wisdom[三智] (Jpn san-chi)
three leaders and seven witnesses[三師七証] (Jpn sanshi-shichishō)
three major works on the Lotus Sutra[法華三大部] (Jpn Hokke-sandai-bu)
three major writings of the T’ien-t’ai school[天台三大部] (Jpn Tendai-sandai-bu)
three martyrs of Atsuhara[熱原の三烈士] (Jpn Atsuhara-no-sanresshi)
three meditations for emancipation[三解脱門] (Jpn san-gedatsu-mon)
three metaphors of the essential teaching[本門の三譬] (Jpn hommon-no-sampi)
three metaphors of the theoretical teaching[迹門の三譬] (Jpn shakumon-no-sampi)
three-month retreat[安居] (Skt varsha or vārshika; Pali vassa; Jpn ango)
three mysteries[三密] (Jpn san-mitsu)
three mystic principles[三妙] (Jpn san-myō)
three obstacles and four devils[三障四魔] (Jpn sanshō-shima)
three ordination platforms[三戒壇] (Jpn san-kaidan)
three paths(1) (3) [三道] (Jpn san-dō); (2) [三途] (Jpn san-zu)
three periods[三時] (Jpn san-ji)
three periods, teachings of the[三時教] (Jpn sanji-kyō)
three poisons[三毒] (Jpn san-doku)
three powerful enemies[三類の強敵] (Jpn sanrui-no-gōteki)
three-pronged diamond-pounder[三鈷杵] (Jpn sanko-sho)
three pronouncements[三箇の勅宣・三箇の鳳詔] (Jpn sanka-no-chokusen or sanka-no-hōshō)
three proofs[三証] (Jpn san-shō)
three Pure Land sutras[浄土三部経] (Jpn Jōdo-sambu-kyō)
three realms of existence[三世間] (Jpn san-seken)
three refuges[三帰・三帰依・三帰戒] (Jpn san-ki, san-kie, or san-kikai)
three robes[三衣] (Jpn sanne)
three robes and one begging bowl[三衣一鉢] (Jpn sanne-ippatsu)
three rules of preaching[三軌・弘経の三軌] (Jpn san-ki or gukyō-no-sanki)
three schools of the south and seven schools of the north[南三北七] (Jpn nansan-hokushichi)
three seals of Dharma[三法印] (Jpn sambōin)
three stages of worthiness[三賢・三賢位] (Jpn san-gen or san-gen-i)
Three Stages school[三階教] (Chin San-chieh-chiao; Jpn Sangai-kyō)
three standards of comparison[三種の教相] (Jpn sanshu-no-kyōsō)
three sufferings[三苦] (Jpn san-ku)
three thousand realms in a single moment of life[一念三千] (Jpn ichinen-sanzen)
three thousand rules of conduct[三千威儀] (Jpn sanzen-igi)
three-time gaining of distinction[三度の高名] (Jpn sando-no-kōmyō)
three-time purification of the lands[三変土田] (Jpn sampen-doden)
three treasures[三宝] (Skt triratna or ratna-traya; Jpn sambō)
Three Treatises school[三論宗] (Chin San-lun-tsung; Jpn Sanron-shū)
three True Word sutras[真言三部経] (Jpn Shingon-sambu-kyō)
three truths[三諦] (Jpn san-tai)
three types of action[三業] (Jpn san-gō)
three types of character[三性] (Jpn san-shō)
three types of enemies[三類の敵人] (Jpn sanrui-no-tekijin)
three types of expedient means[三方便] (Jpn san-hōben)
three types of learning[三学] (Jpn san-gaku)
three types of meditation[三等至・三定・三静慮] (Jpn san-tōji, san-jō, or san-jōryo)
three vehicles[三乗] (Jpn sanjō)
three vehicle teachings[三乗法] (Jpn sanjō-hō)
three virtues[三徳] (Jpn san-toku)
three ways[三道] (Jpn san-dō)
three worthies[三賢] (Jpn san-gen)
thrice turned wheel of the Law[三転法輪] (Jpn san-tembōrin)
Thus Come One[如来] (Skt, Pali tathāgata; Jpn nyorai)
Thus Come One Zen[如来禅] (Jpn nyorai-zen)
Tibetan Buddhism[チベット仏教] (Jpn Chibetto-bukkyō)
T’ien-t’ai[天台] (538–597) (PY Tiantai; Jpn Tendai)
T’ien-t’ai, Mount[天台山] (PY Tiantai-shan; Jpn Tendai-san)
T’ien-t’ai school[天台宗] (PY Tiantaizong; Jpn Tendai-shū)
T’ien-t’ai’s three major works[天台三大部] (Jpn Tendai-sandai-bu)
Ti-lun school[地論宗] (PY Dilunzong; Jpn Jiron-shū)
Time school[時宗] (Jpn Ji-shū)
tipitaka[三蔵] (Pali; Jpn san-zō)
tōba[塔婆] (Jpn)
Tōdai-ji[東大寺]
Tōfuku-ji[東福寺]
Tō-ji[東寺]
Tōjō Kagenobu[東条景信] (n.d.)
Toki Jōnin[富木常忍] (1216–1299)
Tokuichi[徳一]
Tokuitsu[徳一] (n.d.)
Tōshōdai-ji[唐招提寺]
transference of benefit[廻向・回向] (Skt parināma or parināmana; Jpn ekō)
transfer of the essence of the Lotus Sutra[結要付嘱] (Jpn ketchō-fuzoku)
transformation body[変化身・化身] (Jpn henge-shin or keshin)
transmigration in the six paths[六道輪廻] (Jpn rokudō-rinne)
transmigration with change and advance[変易生死] (Jpn hen’yaku-shōji or hennyaku-shōji)
transmigration with differences and limitations[分段生死] (Jpn bundan-shōji)
transmission from mind to mind[以心伝心] (Jpn ishin-denshin)
transmission of the essence of the Lotus Sutra[結要付嘱] (Jpn ketchō-fuzoku)
Transmission of the Lamp, The[伝灯録] (Chin Ch’uan-teng-lu; Jpn Dentō-roku)
transmission section[流通分] (Jpn rutsū-bun)
Travels of Fa-hsien, The[法顕伝] (Chin Fa-hsien-chuan; Jpn Hokken-den)
Trāyastrimsha Heaven[忉利天] (Skt; Jpn Tōri-ten)
treasure tower[宝塔] (Jpn hōtō)
“Treasure Tower” chapter[宝塔品] (Jpn Hōtō-hon)
Treasury of Knowledge of the True Law, The[正法眼蔵] (Jpn Shōbō-genzō)
Treatise of Five Hundred Questions, The[五百問論] (Chin Wu-pai-wen-lun; Jpn Gohyaku-mon-ron)
Treatise on Accordance with the Correct Doctrine, The[阿毘達磨順正理論] (Chin A-p’i-ta-mo-shun-cheng-li-lun; Jpn Abidatsuma-junshōri-ron)
Treatise on Rebirth in the Pure Land, The[往生論] (Jpn Ōjō-ron)
Treatise on the Buddha Nature, The[仏性論] (Chin Fo-hsing-lun; Jpn Busshō-ron)
Treatise on the Discipline for Attaining Enlightenment, The[菩提資糧論] (Chin P’u-t’i-tzu-liang-lun; Jpn Bodai-shiryō-ron)
Treatise on the Establishment of the Consciousness-Only Doctrine, The[成唯識論] (Chin Ch’eng-wei-shih-lun; Jpn Jō-yuishiki-ron)
Treatise on the Establishment of Truth, The[成実論] (Skt Satyasiddhi-shāstra; Chin Ch’eng-shih-lun; Jpn Jōjitsu-ron)
Treatise on the Great Perfection of Wisdom, The[大智度論] (Skt Mahāprajnāpāramitā-shāstra; Chin Ta-chih-tu-lun; Jpn Daichido-ron)
Treatise on the Lamp for the Latter Day of the Law, The[末法燈明記] (Jpn Mappō-tōmyō-ki)
Treatise on the Lamp of Wisdom, The[般若灯論・般若灯論釈] (Skt Prajnā-pradīpa; Chin Pan-jo-teng-lun or Pan-jo-teng-lun-shih; Jpn Hannya-tōron or Hannya-tōron-shaku)
Treatise on the Lotus Sutra, The[法華論・法華経論] (Skt Saddharma-pundarīka-upadesha; Chin Fa-hua-lun or Fa-hua-ching-lun; Jpn Hokke-ron or Hokekyō-ron)
Treatise on the Lotus Sutra of the Wonderful Law, The[妙法蓮華経憂波提舎] (Jpn Myoho-renge-kyo-upadaisha)
Treatise on the Middle Way, The[中論] (Skt Mādhyamika-shāstra; Chin Chung-lun; Jpn Chū-ron)
Treatise on the Mind Aspiring for Enlightenment, The[菩提心論] (Chin P’u-t’i-hsin-lun; Jpn Bodaishin-ron)
Treatise on the Observation of the Mind, The[観心論] (Chin Kuan-hsin-lun; Jpn Kanjin-ron)
Treatise on the Profundity of the Lotus Sutra, The[法華玄論] (Chin Fa-hua-hsüan-lun; Jpn Hokke-genron)
Treatise on the Pure Land, The[浄土論] (Chin Ching-t’u-lun; Jpn Jōdo-ron) (1) (2)
Treatise on the Source of Wisdom, The[阿毘達磨発智論] (Skt Abhidharma-jnānaprasthāna-shāstra; Chin A-p’i-ta-mo-fa-chih-lun; Jpn Abidatsuma-hotchi-ron)
Treatise on the Stages of Yoga Practice, The[瑜伽師地論] (Skt Yogāchārabhūmi; Chin Yü-ch’ieh-shih-ti-lun; Jpn Yugashiji-ron)
Treatise on the Ten Stages of the Mind, The[十住心論] (Jpn Jūjū-shin-ron)
Treatise on the Ten Stages Sutra, The[十地経論] (Chin Shih-ti-ching-lun; Jpn Jūji-kyō-ron)
Treatise on the Ten Stages Sutra school[地論宗] (Chin Ti-lun-tsung; Jpn Jiron-shū)
Treatise on the Treasure Vehicle of Buddhahood, The[究竟一乗宝性論] (Skt Ratnagotravibhāga-mahāyānottaratantra-shāstra; Chin Chiu-ching-i-ch’eng-pao-hsing-lun; Jpn Kukyō-ichijō-hōshō-ron)
Treatise on the Twelve Gates, The[十二門論] (Chin Shih-erh-men-lun; Jpn Jūni-mon-ron)
Treatise Resolving Numerous Doubts about the Pure Land Teachings, The[釈浄土群疑論] (Chin Shih-ching-t’u-ch’ün-i-lun; Jpn Shaku-jōdo-gungi-ron)
Treatises of Seng-chao, The[肇論] (Chin Chao-lun; Jpn Jō-ron)
trikāya[三身] (Skt; Jpn san-jin)
Tripitaka[三蔵] (Skt; Jpn san-zō)
Tripitaka master[三蔵] (Skt; Jpn san-zō)
Tripitaka teaching[蔵教] (Skt; Jpn zō-kyō)
triratna[三宝] (Skt; Jpn sambō)
true aspect of all phenomena[諸法実相] (Jpn shohō-jissō)
true Buddha[本仏] (Jpn hombutsu)
true cause[本因妙] (Jpn honnin-myō)
true effect[本果妙] (Jpn honga-myō)
true land[本国土妙] (Jpn honkokudo-myō)
true Mahayana teaching[実大乗教] (Jpn jitsu-daijō-kyō)
True Pure Land school[浄土真宗] (Jpn Jōdo Shin-shū)
true teaching[実教] (Jpn jikkyō)
True Word Precepts school[真言律宗] (Jpn Shingon Risshū)
True Word school[真言宗] (Jpn Shingon-shū)
Truth-Revealed Lotus school[顕本法華宗] (Jpn Kempon Hokke-shū)
Ts’ai Yin[蔡愔] (n.d.) (PY Cai Yin; Jpn Saiin)
Tsukahara Debate[塚原問答] (Jpn Tsukahara-mondō)
Tsukimaro[月満] (b. 1271)
Ts’ung-i[従義] (1042–1091) (PY Congyi; Jpn Jūgi)
Tsung-mi[宗密] (780–841) (PY Zongmi; Jpn Shūmitsu)
Tsun-shih[遵式] (964–1032) (PY Zunshi; Jpn Junshiki)
tuft of white hair[白毫相・眉間白毫相] (Skt ūrnā-kesha or ūrnā-kosha; Jpn byakugō-sō or miken-byakugō-sō)
Tung-ch’un[東春] (PY Dongchun; Jpn Tōshun)
Tun-huang[敦煌] (PY Dunhuang; Jpn Tonkō)
Turfan[トルファン] (Jpn Torufan)
turning of the wheel of the Law[転法輪] (Jpn tembō-rin)
Tushita Heaven[兜率天・覩史多天] (Skt; Jpn Tosotsu-ten or Toshita-ten)
Tu-shun[杜順] (557–640) (PY Dushun; Jpn Tojun)
twelve bases[十二入・十二処] (Jpn jūni-nyū or jūni-sho)
twelve divisions of the scriptures[十二部経] (Jpn jūnibu-kyō)
twelve divisions of the teachings[十二分教] (Jpn jūnibun-kyō)
twelvefold dhūta practice[十二頭陀行] (Jpn jūni-zuda-gyō)
twelve gods[十二天] (Jpn jūni-ten)
twelve great vows[十二大願] (Jpn jūni-daigan)
twelve-linked chain of causation[十二因縁・十二縁起] (Jpn jūni-innen or jūni-engi)
twelve sense fields[十二入・十二処] (Jpn jūni-nyū or jūni-sho)
twelve sense-media[十二入・十二処] (Jpn jūni-nyū or jūni-sho)
twelve vows[十二願] (Jpn jūni-gan)
twenty-eight heavens[二十八天] (Jpn nijūhatten or nijūhachi-ten)
twenty-eight Indian patriarchs[天竺二十八祖・西天二十八祖・二十八祖] (Jpn Tenjiku-nijūhasso, Saiten-nijūhasso, or nijūhasso)
twenty-five preparatory exercises[二十五方便] (Jpn nijūgo-hōben)
twenty-five realms of existence[二十五有] (Jpn nijūgo-u)
twenty-four-character Lotus Sutra[二十四文字の法華経] (Jpn nijūyo-moji-no-hokekyō)
twenty-four successors[付法蔵の二十四人] (Jpn fuhōzō-no-nijūyo-nin)
twenty Hinayana schools[二十部・小乗二十部] (Jpn nijū-bu or shōjō-nijū-bu)
twenty-line verse[二十行の偈] (Jpn nijūgyō-no-ge)
twenty schools[二十部] (Jpn nijū-bu)
Twenty-six Admonitions of Nikkō, The[日興遺誡置文] (Jpn Nikkō-yuikai-okibumi)
Twenty-six Warning Articles, The[日興遺誡置文] (Jpn Nikkō-yuikai-okibumi)
Twenty-Stanza Treatise on the Consciousness-Only Doctrine, The[唯識二十論] (Skt Vimshatikā-vijnaptimātratā-siddhi; Chin Wei-shih-erh-shih-lun; Jpn Yuishiki-nijū-ron)
twenty-three successors[付法蔵の二十三人・二十三祖] (Jpn fuhōzō-no-nijūsan-nin or nijūsan-so)
two admonitions[二箇の諫暁] (Jpn nika-no-kangyō)
two hundred and fifty precepts[二百五十戒] (Jpn nihyaku-gojikkai)
two places and three assemblies[二処三会] (Jpn nisho-san’e)
two storehouses[二蔵] (Jpn nizō)
two transfer documents[二箇相承書] (Jpn nika-sōjō-sho)
two vehicles[二乗] (Jpn nijō)
Two-Volumed Sutra[双巻経・双観経] (Jpn Sōkan-gyō)
Tz’u-en[慈恩] (632–682) (PY Cien; Jpn Jion)
Tz’u-en-ssu[慈恩寺] (PY Ciensi; Jpn Jion-ji)
Appendix C
Sanskrit Personal Names and Their Japanese Equivalents

Sanskrit Names Japanese Names

Agastya Akada (阿竭多仙人)
Ajātashatru (Ajātaśatru) Ajase (阿闍世王)
Ājnāta Kaundinya (Ājñāta Kauṇḍinya) Anyakyōjinnyo (阿若憍陳如)
Akshobhya (Akṣobhya) Ashuku (阿閦仏)
Ānanda Anan (阿難)
Angulimāla (Aṅgulimāla) Ōkutsumara (央掘摩羅)
Aniruddha Anaritsu (阿那律)
Āryadeva Daiba (提婆菩薩)
Āryasimha (Āryasiṃha) Shishi (師子尊者)
Asanga (Asaṅga) Mujaku (無著)
Ashoka (Aśoka) Asoka (阿育王)
Ashvaghosha (Aśvaghoṣa) Memyō (馬鳴)
Asita Ashi (阿私仙人); Ashida (阿私陀仙人)
Bakkula Bakura (跋倶羅)
Bhāvaviveka Shōben (清弁)
Bimbisāra Bimbashara (頻婆娑羅王)
Bodhidharma Daruma (達磨)
Bodhiruchi (Bodhiruci) Bodairushi (菩提流支)
Brahmā Bonten (梵天)
Buddhamitra Buddamitta (仏陀密多)
Buddhananda Buddanandai (仏陀難提)
Chandraprabha (Candraprabha) Gakkō (月光)
Chūdapanthaka (Cūḍapanthaka) Surihandoku (須利槃特)
Chunda (Cunda) Junda (純陀)
Devadatta Daibadatta (提婆達多)
Dharmagupta Darumakikuta (達摩掬多)
Dharmapāla Gohō (護法)
Dharmodgata Dommukatsu (曇無竭菩薩)
Dhritaka (Dhṛtaka) Daitaka (提多迦)
Dignāga Jinna (陳那)
Dīrghanakha Chōsō (長爪)
Dronodana (Droṇodana) Kokubon (斛飯王)
Gautamī Kyōdommi (憍曇弥)
Gopikā Kui (瞿夷)
Gunamati (Guṇamati) Tokue (徳慧)
Gunavarman (Guṇavarman) Gunabatsuma (求那跋摩)
Haklenayashas (Haklenayaśas) Kakuroku (鶴勒)
Harivarman Karibatsuma (訶梨跋摩)
Jayata Jayana (闍夜那)
Jinu Gito (耆菟)
Jīvaka Giba (耆婆)
Jnānagupta (Jñānagupta) Janakutta (闍那崛多)
Jnānaprabha (Jñānaprabha) Chikō (智光)
Kanishka (Kaniṣka) Kanishika (迦弐志加王)
Kapila Kabira (迦毘羅)
Kapimala Bira (毘羅)
Kāshyapa (Kāśyapa) Kashō-dōji (迦葉童子菩薩); Kashō (迦葉仏)
Kāshyapa Mātanga (Kāśyapa Mātaṅga) Kashōmatō (迦葉摩騰)
Kātyāyana Kasennen (迦旃延)
Kaushika (Kauśika) Kyōshika (憍尸迦)
Kokālika Kugyari (瞿伽利)
Krakucchanda Kuruson (拘留孫仏)
Krita (Kṛta) Kirita (訖利多王)
Kumārajīva Kumarajū (鳩摩羅什)
Kumārata Kumarada (鳩摩羅駄)
Mādhava Matōba (摩沓婆)
Madhyāntika Madenchi (末田地)
Mahākāshyapa (Mahākāśyapa) Kashō (迦葉)
Mahākātyāyana Makakasennen (摩訶迦旃延)
Mahānāma Shakumanan (釈摩男)
Mahāprajāpatī Makahajahadai (摩訶波闍波提)
Mahāsammata (Mahāsaṃmata) Daisammata (大三末多王)
Mahāvairochana (Mahāvairocana) Dainichi (大日如来)
Maheshvara (Maheśvara) Makeishura-ten (摩醯首羅天)
Maitreya Miroku (弥勒菩薩)
Manibhadra (Maṇibhadra) Manibadda (摩尼跋陀)
Manjushrī (Mañjuśrī) Monjushiri (文殊師利菩薩)
Manoratha Nyoi (如意論師)
Manorhita Manura (摩奴羅)
Marīchi (Marīci) Marishi-ten (摩利支天)
Maudgalyāyana Mokuren (目連)
Māyā Maya (摩耶)
Mihirakula Daizoku (大族王)
Mikkaka Mishaka (弥遮迦)
Nāgabodhi Ryūchi (竜智)
Nāgārjuna Ryūju (竜樹)
Nirgrantha Niken (尼犍)
Nirgrantha Jnātaputra (Nirgrantha Jñātaputra) Niken (尼犍)
Nyagrodha Nikurida (尼倶律陀)
Panthaka Handoku (槃特)
Pāpīyas Hajun (波旬)
Paramārtha Shindai (真諦)
Pārshva (Pārśva) Kyōbiku (脇比丘)
Pindola (Piṇḍola) Binzuru (賓頭盧尊者)
Prasenajit Hashinoku (波斯匿王)
Punyayashas (Puṇyayaśas) Funasha (富那奢)
Pūrna (Pūrṇa) Furuna (富楼那)
Pushyamitra (Puṣyamitra) Hosshamittara (弗沙弥多羅王)
Rāhula Ragora (羅睺羅)
Rāhulabhadra Rago (羅睺)
Ratnamati Rokunamadai (勒那摩提)
Rishabha (Ŗṣabha) Rokushaba (勒沙婆)
Sāgara Shakatsura (娑竭羅竜王)
Samghanandi (Saṃghanandi) Sōgyanandai (僧佉難提)
Samghayashas (Saṃghayaśas) Sōgyayasha (僧佉耶奢)
Sāramati Kenne (堅慧)
Shakra (Śakra) Taishaku-ten (帝釈天)
Shakra Devānām Indra (Śakra Devānām Indra) Shakudai-kan’in (釈提桓因)
Shakyamuni (Śākyamuni) Shakuson(釈尊)
Shānavāsa (Śāṇavāsa) Shōnawashu (商那和修)
Shāriputra (Śāriputra) Sharihotsu (舎利弗)
Shashānka (Śaśāṅka) Sesshōka (説賞迦王)
Shibi (Śibi) Shibi (尸毘王)
Shīlabhadra (Śīlabhadra) Kaigen (戒賢)
Shīlāditya (Śīlāditya) Kainichi (戒日王)
Shronakotivimsha (Śroṇakoṭiviṃśa) Okuni (億耳)
Shuddhodana (Śuddhodana) Jōbon (浄飯王)
Shūryasoma (Śūryasoma) Shuriyasoma (須利耶蘇摩)
Siddhārtha Shiddatta (悉達多)
Simhahanu (Siṃhahanu) Shishikyō (師子頰王)
Subhūti Shubodai (須菩提)
Sudatta Shudatsu (須達長者)
Sunakshatra (Sunakṣatra) Zenshō (善星比丘)
Udayana Uden (優塡王)
Ulūka Urusōgya (漚楼僧伽); Kuru (留外道)
Upagupta Ubakikuta (優婆毱多)
Utpalavarnā (Utpalavarṇā) Rengeshiki (蓮華色比丘尼)
Vaidehī Idaike (韋提希)
Vairochana (Vairocana) Birushana (毘盧遮那)
Vaishravana (Vaiśravaṇa) Bishamon-ten (毘沙門天)
Vajrasattva Kongōsatta(金剛薩埵)
Vasu Baso-ten (婆籔天)
Vasubandhu Seshin (世親)
Vimalakīrti Yuimakitsu (維摩詰)
Vimalamitra Muku (無垢論師)
Virūdhaka (Virūḍhaka) Haruri (波瑠璃王)
Vishnu (Viṣṇu) Bichū-ten (毘紐天)
Yama Emma (閻魔王)
Yashodharā (Yaśodharā) Yashutara (耶輸多羅)
192. The Portable Shrine Incidents: Mikoshi furi gosho (御輿振御書), 1264.
192
The Portable Shrine Incidents
I WAS pleased to receive your letter as well as the daily records regarding the portable shrine incidents.1 The burning of the main hall must signify that the end has come for the Buddhism of Mount Hiei. And it must announce that the time has arrived for the ruin of its school. Of course there are good reasons for such occurrences.
Jetavana Monastery and Kukkutārāma Monastery in India, and the temple on Mount T’ien-t’ai in China, fell into ruin in the space of the two-thousand-year period of the Former and Middle Days of the Law. And now, in the Latter Day of the Law, Hiei, the mountain of the T’ien-t’ai teaching, is found in Japan alone. Throughout the entire major world system, it is found in this one place only, is it not?
Can there be any doubt that devils will concentrate their envy on this one spot? And that the followers of Hinayana and the provisional teachings are also jealous of it? As a result, Zen priests, Precepts priests, and Nembutsu priests complain about Mount Hiei to the ruler and his ministers, the three thousand priests on the mountain fail to recognize the root of the ruin of their own school, and both priests and lay supporters alike are deluded about the cause of the destruction of their country and of the Buddha’s teachings.
The only thing we should rely on now is the passage in the seventh volume of the Lotus Sutra that reads, “In the last five-hundred-year period you must spread it abroad widely throughout Jambudvīpa,”2 is it not?
And we should also rely on the passage of commentary by the Great Teacher Dengyō that reads, “The Former and Middle Days are almost over, and the Latter Day is near at hand. Now indeed is the time when the one vehicle of the Lotus Sutra will prove how perfectly it fits the capacities of all people.”3
Extinction occurs so that there may be rebirth, and descent so that there may be ascent. Could it be that such difficulties as these have come about so that Mount Hiei may flourish in the future?
It is impossible to put down in a letter all that I might wish to say. I look forward to meeting you at the earliest opportunity.
Respectfully,
Nichiren

The first day of the third month
Written in reply
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p.305

Background
Nichiren Daishonin wrote this letter at Kamakura on the first day of the third month, in answer to a letter and daily records regarding what were known as the portable shrine incidents sent him by his disciple Sammi-bō. The letter was probably written in 1265, though 1264 and 1269 have also been suggested as possible dates. Sammi-bō, who was studying in Kyoto at the time, had reported the news about “the burning of the main hall” at Enryaku-ji temple on Mount Hiei. He had also kept and sent a daily record of events surrounding the portable shrine incidents. The priests of Mount Hiei had pressured the imperial court to accept certain demands by parading through the streets of Kyoto with a portable shrine from Hie Shrine, which was associated with Enryaku-ji. These actions had intimidated the court and the citizens of the capital. Referring to these incidents and to the burning of the main hall, the Daishonin says that they are proof that “the end has come for the Buddhism of Mount Hiei,” or the Tendai school. In closing, the Daishonin refers to the possibility that Mount Hiei may flourish again in the future, signifying his confidence in the spread of the one vehicle teaching of the Lotus Sutra in the Latter Day of the Law.
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Notes
1. A reference to incidents in which the priests of Enryaku-ji temple on Mount Hiei made forcible demands on the imperial court in Kyoto while carrying the portable shrine of the god of Mount Hiei.
2. Lotus Sutra, chap. 23.
3. An Essay on the Protection of the Nation.

The Writings of Nichiren Daishonin Part 1:
20
The Birth of Tsukimaro

Background
I UNDERSTAND that your baby has been born. Congratulations! In particular, today is the eighth day of the month. Not only have you had your baby, but on such an auspicious day! The fulfillment of your wish is now complete, just like the tide at the high watermark or the blossoming of flowers in a spring meadow. Thus, I have wasted no time in giving her a name. Please call her Tsukimaro.
What is more, Great Bodhisattva Hachiman, the sovereign deity of this country, was born on the eighth day of the fourth month. Shakyamuni Buddha, the lord of teachings in this sahā world, was also born on the eighth day of the fourth month. Though the month is different, your baby girl was also born on the eighth day. She could well be the reincarnation of Shakyamuni Buddha or Hachiman. Since I am an ordinary man, I have no way of knowing for certain, but I am convinced that the reason for this auspicious birth is that I gave you the protective agent.1 How happy you, her parents, must be! In celebration, you have kindly sent me rice cakes, sake, and one thousand coins. I have also reported this to the object of devotion and the ten demon daughters.
When the Buddha was born in this world, there were thirty-two auspicious phenomena,2 as is recorded in a work called The Record of Wonders in the Book of Chou. Immediately following his birth, Shakyamuni Buddha took seven steps, opened his mouth, and uttered the words, expressed in sixteen characters, “Throughout heaven and earth, I alone am worthy of respect. The threefold world is a place of suffering from which I will save all living beings.” Tsukimaro must have chanted Nam-myoho-renge-kyo with her very first cry at birth. The Lotus Sutra speaks of “the true aspect of all phenomena.”3 T’ien-t’ai said, “Voices do the Buddha’s work.”4 This is also what I think. The deaf cannot hear the thunder, and the blind cannot see the light of the sun and moon. But I am quite certain that the ten demon daughters must be together side by side, giving the baby her first bath and watching over her growth.
Let me heartily congratulate you. I can imagine your joy. I have respectfully reported this to the ten demon daughters and to the Sun Goddess. I am too excited to write any more. I will be writing you again.
Respectfully,
Nichiren

Reply to Shijō Kingo
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p.189Background
This letter was written at Kamakura on the eighth day of the fifth month in the eighth year of Bun’ei (1271) to Shijō Kingo and his wife, Nichigen-nyo. It is Nichiren Daishonin’s reply to the report that Kingo had sent concerning the birth of the couple’s first child and their request that the Daishonin name the baby.
On the preceding day Nichigen-nyo had received from the Daishonin a protective agent to ensure a safe delivery and a short letter of encouragement. That letter is entitled Easy Delivery of a Fortune Child (p. 186). Nichigen-nyo gave birth the next day, the day of the present letter, to a baby girl. The Daishonin named the child Tsukimaro, or Full Moon. The couple’s second daughter was born in the autumn of 1272. The Daishonin named her Kyō’ō, or Sutra King.
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Notes
1. The use of a protective agent was common practice among the Buddhist schools of feudal Japan. Generally the agent took the form of the figure or words of Buddhas, bodhisattvas, or deities written on paper or wood. One then either placed this item somewhere in one’s home, attached it to one’s person, or, if it was made of paper, ingested it. The protective agent also sometimes took the form of powdered herbs that were to be dissolved in water and drunk. What formula the Daishonin used for his protective agent is unknown.
2. Good omens, mentioned in the Sutra of the Buddha’s Marvelous Deeds in Previous Lifetime, that occurred when Shakyamuni Buddha made his appearance in this world.
3. Lotus Sutra, chap. 2.
4. The Profound Meaning of the Lotus Sutra.

end of gosho: 20. The Birth of Tsukimaro: Tsukimaro gozen gosho (月満御前御書), 1110.

Cultural and Religious Background (WND-1)

Japan at an early stage of its history was affected by the strong cultural influence of China and Korea. The Japanese adopted the Chinese written language for use in keeping government records and writing works of history and philosophy, and utilized the Chinese characters to devise a writing system for their own language. They also, as was noted earlier, introduced much of the Chinese bureaucratic system, setting up a centralized system of government under the supreme authority of the emperor. In such fields as philosophy, art, architecture, medicine, and engineering, the Japanese likewise borrowed heavily from the continent.
About the middle of the sixth century, according to traditional accounts, Buddhism was introduced to Japan from Korea. At first it met with sharp resistance from supporters of the native Shinto faith, but in time gained a foothold among the upper classes. Soon the government was taking an active role in encouraging the new religion, founding temples, welcoming priests from abroad, and sending Japanese priests to the mainland for study. The great city of Nara, capital of the nation from 710 to 784, was famed for its imposing array of temples and the gigantic bronze image of the Buddha Vairochana that was erected by the government in 749.
But the type of Buddhism brought to Japan at this time, though mainly Mahayana in thought, was largely concerned with abstruse doctrine or the observance of complex rules of monastic discipline. Beyond the outward majesty and beauty of the buildings and images associated with it, there was little in this sort of Buddhism that appealed to or was understood by ordinary people of limited education. The aristocracy patronized the religion because they believed it would help insure their personal safety and well-being and that of the state. But it is unlikely that the Buddhist influence penetrated very deeply at the lower levels of Japanese society.
In the early Heian period, two new schools of Buddhism were introduced from China. The first was T’ien-t’ai Buddhism, which was introduced by Saichō (767–822), better known by his posthumous title, the Great Teacher Dengyō. This Buddhism spread in Japan under the name Tendai Buddhism, Tendai being the Japanese rendering of the Chinese T’ien-t’ai. The T’ien-t’ai doctrines, which are based on the Lotus Sutra, form one of the chief elements in the teaching of Nichiren Daishonin. The second school was True Word, or esoteric Buddhism, introduced by Kūkai (774–835), or the Great Teacher Kōbō. It emphasized the role of music and the arts in assisting one to gain religious understanding, and advocated various mystic rituals to ward off evil and attain salvation.
While both of these new schools of Buddhism enjoyed the support of the government, they preferred to establish their headquarters on mountaintop retreats somewhat removed from the court. The head temple of the Tendai school was situated on Mount Hiei northeast of Kyoto, and that of the True Word school on Mount Kōya far to the south. Both mountain monasteries played a vital role in later centuries as centers of Buddhist learning, the former in particular serving as a training ground for many of the most famous leaders of Japanese Buddhism, including Nichiren Daishonin.
However, although both schools emphasized that all beings are capable of attaining Buddhahood, they appear to have done little to spread that message among the people. Instead, True Word, and in time the Tendai as well, became increasingly concerned with the performance of elaborate rituals and mystic incantations, or caught up in sordid struggles for power with rival schools or among the warring factions within their own schools.
Turning to literature for a moment, it is important to note that The Collection of Ten Thousand Leaves, the great anthology of ancient Japanese poetry compiled toward the close of the Nara period (710–784), is outstanding for its relative simplicity, directness of expression, and sunniness of outlook, as well as for the fact that it includes poems from all classes of society.
In the succeeding Heian period, however, poetry became almost exclusively the possession of the courtly class, and grew increasingly contrived in expression and intellectual in tone. At the same time both poetry and other literary forms became imbued with an air of melancholy. The beginnings of this pessimistic attitude are already to be glimpsed in Collection of Ten Thousand Leaves and are characteristically associated with the Buddhist emphasis upon the impermanent and ever-changing nature of life, a quality known in Japanese as mujō. Buddhism, of course, stresses the element of change in human life in order to rouse people to think seriously about their salvation. Fundamentally, Mahayana Buddhism is anything but pessimistic in outlook. But to the Japanese of the Heian period, particularly in its later trouble-filled years, the great hope held out by the Buddhist religion seemed less real than the inevitability of change, which to them invariably meant change for the worse. Thus, the greatest literary work of the period, The Tale of Genji, which dates from the eleventh century, is suffused with a sense of the briefness, uncertainly, and inherent sadness of life.
The Japanese of this period had a particular reason for believing that life was fated to be sorrowful and that hopes for salvation were uncertain. Buddhism taught that, after the passing of Shakyamuni Buddha, the Buddhist teachings would go through three major periods of change: an age when the Law, or doctrine, would flourish, an age when it would begin to decline, and finally an age known as the Latter Day of the Law, when the Law, or doctrine, would decline even further and ultimately lose its power of salvation.
Although there are different methods of calculating the duration of the three periods, the Japanese believed that they would enter the age of the Latter Day around the middle of the eleventh century. Their expectations seemed to be confirmed at this time by the declining power of the court, unrest in the outlying areas, and other signs of decay in the social order.
In earlier times Japanese Buddhism, particularly the Tendai school, had stressed that it is possible for a person to achieve enlightenment, or Buddhahood, in this life through his or her own efforts. But there was a widespread feeling that, with the arrival of the Latter Day of the Law, such hopes would become unrealistic. In the Tendai monastery at Mount Hiei a belief arose that, in an age of degeneracy, one must look to some outside power as the means of obtaining enlightenment. This belief made faith in the saving power of the Buddha Amida look increasingly attractive. Amida is a Buddha who is said to preside over a paradise known as the Pure Land of Perfect Bliss. As a bodhisattva, he took a vow to save all people who call upon his name and to see that, after death, they are reborn to a life of bliss in the far-off Pure Land.
The practice of offering prayers to Amida was very popular in Chinese Buddhism and was introduced to Japan at an early date. But it was not until Heian times that it became widespread. One may easily see why its appeal was so great. It did not demand that the believer undertake any strenuous religious exercises or abide by strict rules of discipline. All one had to do was to recite the simple formula of praise known as the Nembutsu with sincere faith in order to be assured of salvation. The aristocrats, notably the members of the Fujiwara family, demonstrated their enthusiasm for the worship of Amida by erecting magnificent temples adorned with splendid golden statues of him. At the same time, priests went about among the common people to preach the message of Amida’s salvation and to sing hymns of praise. As a result, Buddhism spread more widely than ever before among the lower classes and came to take a deep hold upon the spiritual life of the nation.
At first, this devotion to Amida remained simply one element among the religious practices of the Tendai school, the dominant school in the Heian period. But in the closing years of that period, two vigorous religious leaders appeared who established a separate form of Buddhism based solely on devotion to Amida. The first was Honen (1133–1212), the founder of the Pure Land school. The other was Shinran (1173–1262), whose followers in time came to be known as the True Pure Land school. Both men received religious training at Mount Hiei, but were later forced to leave the capital area because of opposition from the older schools of Buddhism. Their teachings in time won a wide following, particularly in rural areas.
If the masterpiece of Heian literature is The Tale of Genji, that of the Kamakura period is the historical romance known as The Tale of the Heike. The Tale of Genji was written by a woman, Murasaki Shikibu, and deals almost entirely with the lives and romantic intrigues of the court aristocracy. The Tale of the Heike, an anonymous work, was probably compiled in the thirteenth century on the basis of narratives that had been circulated earlier in oral form by storytellers. It describes in detail the phenomenal rise to power of the Heike, or Taira, family, and its overthrow by the Minamoto family. In marked contrast to The Tale of Genji, the work abounds in scenes of conflict and military prowess, is written in a sonorous masculine style, and reflects the interests and ideals of the newly emergent warrior class. There is one way, however, in which it resembles the earlier masterpiece. The Tale of Genji, as we have seen, is dominated by a mood of sadness over the brevity of human life. This same note of melancholy informs The Tale of the Heike, sounding in the very first sentences of the work. Indeed, to the Japanese of the time, the dramatic rise and fall of the Taira family was the ultimate symbol of mujō, the unavoidable transience of worldly glory.
As this similarity suggests, the culture of the Kamakura period in one sense marked a sharp break with the past, but in another, a continuation of it. The samurai, as was suitable for a member of a warrior class in a feudal society, attached great importance to simple living, personal daring, and unswerving loyalty to one’s lord. As we shall see when we come to the life of Nichiren Daishonin, there was a harshness and violence to life in the Kamakura period that reflect the warrior ethic. It was a time when even Buddhist temples armed themselves to defend their property and prerogatives, and the necessity to resort to arms seemed a possibility that was never far away.
At the same time the warriors, having little distinct culture of their own, were obliged to look to the members of the old court aristocracy for leadership in matters of higher culture, no matter how they might despise them for their effete way of life. The attitude of Kamakura toward Kyoto was thus one of ambiguity. Military leaders wished to remain aloof from the enfeebling and intrigue-filled atmosphere of the capital, but they envied the courtiers their knowledgeability in matters of music, poetry, and artistic taste. It is not surprising to find, therefore, that the heads of the Kamakura shogunate and their wives frequently turned to Kyoto for guidance in questions of art and learning, or welcomed to their city religious and cultural leaders from the capital who could act as mentors in such matters.
One of the ways the shogunate officials sought to lend prestige to their city and government was by patronizing a new form of Buddhism known as Zen. Zen was the dominant school of Buddhism in China at this time, and Japanese priests traveled to the mainland to study it and bring its teachings back with them. They attempted to introduce these teachings in Kyoto around the beginning of the thirteenth century, but met with strong opposition from the established schools of Buddhism.
It was natural, therefore, that they should journey to Kamakura, where the older schools exercised less influence, and try to interest the leaders of the military government in their doctrines. The members of the Hōjō family and their followers responded with enthusiasm, founding temples for the new school and inviting Chinese Zen masters to come to Kamakura. Dōryū (1213–1278), or Tao-lung, whom Nichiren Daishonin refers to frequently, was one such Chinese priest who enjoyed great favor with the Hōjō regime.
In its basic doctrines, Zen does not differ much from other Mahayana schools of Buddhism. But, in contrast to those schools that stress study of the sutras and other sacred writings, or the saving power of some particular Buddha or bodhisattva, Zen urges the individual to gain enlightenment the way Shakyamuni Buddha gained it—by spending hours in meditation in the lotus posture. Zen thus minimized the importance of learning and called instead for discipline, untiring personal effort, and obedience to the Zen master. It is easy to see why such a doctrine would appeal to members of the warrior class. It assured them they need cope with no difficult doctrinal writings or philosophical subtleties to gain enlightenment. All they needed was the determination and patience to endure long and often painful hours of meditation. This was something any soldier could understand.
This, then, was the state of religious affairs when Nichiren Daishonin began his activities. The older schools of Buddhism centered in Nara and Kyoto enjoyed great power and prestige, though they were morally weakened by factionalism and worldliness. The Pure Land Buddhists, or Nembutsu believers as Nichiren Daishonin calls them, continued to grow in number, constituting a very important religious element, particularly in the countryside. Zen, though enjoying the patronage of the shogunate in Kamakura, and later of the court in Kyoto, was confined mainly to those two cities. One final Buddhist group mentioned by Nichiren Daishonin is the priests of the Precepts school. This school, which enjoins the observance of elaborate precepts, or rules of monastic discipline, had been introduced to Japan in the Nara period and enjoyed something of a revival in Kamakura times.
The period of Nichiren Daishonin’s lifetime was an age when the Japanese, troubled by rapid social changes they could not fully comprehend, as well as by natural catastrophes and the threat of foreign invasion, were searching for spiritual satisfaction. They attached great importance to religious matters, and were prepared to argue vehemently and even to resort to physical force to defend what they regarded as the truth. It was an age far different from the one of religious tolerance or indifference in which we live today, and in order to understand it, we must make a sincere effort to see into the minds and motives of its inhabitants.

Appendix E
English Personal Names and Their Japanese Equivalents

English Names Japanese Names

All Bright King Issai Myō’ō(一切明王仏)
Aspiration for the Law Gyōbō-bonji(楽法梵志)
Awesome Sound King Ionnō(威音王仏)
Banner-like Virtue Sōtoku(相徳仏)
Born from the Crown of the Head Chōshō(頂生王)
Boundless Practices Muhengyō(無辺行菩薩)
Brave Donor Yuze(勇施菩薩)
Bright Pure Kōjō(光浄菩薩)
Brilliant Virtue Myōtoku(明徳仏)
Buddha Eye Butsugen(仏眼)
Buddha Seed Busshu(仏種王)
Burning Torch Nentō(燃燈仏)
Chief Wise Genju(賢首菩薩)
Cloud Thunder Sound King Unraionnō(雲雷音王仏)
Constellation King Flower Shukuōke(宿王華菩薩)
Craving Ai(愛王)
Craving-Filled Aizen-myō’ō(愛染明王)
Demon Eloquence Kiben(鬼弁婆羅門)
Dharma Clouds Freedom King Hōunjizaiō(法雲自在王如来)
Dharma Lotus Fragrance Hōrenkō(法蓮香比丘尼)
Dharma Treasury Hōzō(法蔵比丘)
Dharma Wisdom Hōe(法慧菩薩)
Diamond Banner Kongōdō(金剛幢菩薩)
Diamond Pounder Kongō-dōji(金剛童子)
Diamond Storehouse Kongōzō(金剛蔵菩薩)
Dragon Seal Ryūin(竜印王)
Earnest Donor Nōse(能施太子)
Earth Repository Jizō(地蔵菩薩)
Ever Wailing Jōtai(常啼菩薩)
Fire-Sustaining Kaji(火持如来)
Firmly Established Practices Anryūgyō(安立行菩薩)
First Emperor of the Ch’in Shikōtei(始皇帝)
Flower Virtue Ketoku(華徳仏)
Forbearance Ninniku(忍辱仙人)
Forest of Merits Kudokurin(功徳林菩薩)
Giver of Treasure Hōse(宝施仏)
Gladly Seen Kiken(喜見菩薩)
Golden Color Konjiki(金色王)
Golden Grains Konzoku(金粟王)
Good Treasures Zenzai-dōji(善財童子)
Good Virtue Zentoku(善徳仏)
Great Adornment Daishōgon(大荘厳仏/大荘厳菩薩)
Great Arrogant Brahman Daiman Baramon(大慢婆羅門)
Great Awesome Virtue Daiitoku-myō’ō(大威徳明王)
Great Power Seishi(勢至菩薩)
Great Universal Wisdom Excellence Daitsūchishō(大通智勝仏)
Holder of Many People Jitanin(持多人王)
Immovable Fudō(不動仏); Fudō-myō’ō(不動明王)
Infinite Brightness Muryōmyō(無量明仏)
Infinite Life Muryōju(無量寿仏)
Invincible Mushō(無勝); Mushō-dōji(無勝童子)
Jeweled Dignity Hōi(宝威仏)
Jeweled Glow Hōkō-tenshi(宝光天子)
Joy Increasing Kangizōyaku(歓喜増益如来)
King Purity of Jeweled Dignity and Virtue Hōitokujō’ō(宝威徳浄王)
Learned Youth Judō(儒童菩薩)
Light Bright Kōmyō(光明王)
Lion Sound King Shishionnō(師子音王仏)
Many Treasures Tahō(多宝仏)
Medicine King Yakuō(薬王菩薩)
Medicine Master Yakushi(薬師如来)
Medicine Superior Yakujō(薬上菩薩)
Moonlight Gakkō(月光菩薩/月光王)
Moon of Deliverance Gedatsugatsu(解脱月菩薩)
Moon Storehouse Gatsuzō(月蔵菩薩)
Mother of Demon Children Kishimojin(鬼子母神)
Never Disparaging Fukyō(不軽菩薩)
One Thousand Stupas Sentō(千塔王)
Painfully Acquired Kutoku(苦得外道)
Perceiver of the World’s Sounds Kanzeon(観世音菩薩)
Pervading Fragrance Fukō-tenshi(普光天子)
Pleasure Virtue Rakutoku(楽徳長者)
Possessor of Virtue Utoku(有徳王)
Pure Eye Jōgen(浄眼)
Pure Flower Constellation King Wisdom Jōkeshukuōchi(浄華宿王智仏)
Pure Practices Jyōgyō(浄行菩薩)
Pure Storehouse Jōzō(浄蔵)
Pure Virtue Jōtoku(浄徳夫人)
Queen Mother of the West Seiōbo(西王母)
Rare Moon Myōgatsu-tenshi(名月天子)
Realization of Virtue Kakutoku(覚徳比丘)
Root of Joy Kikon(喜根比丘)
Same Birth Dōshō-ten(同生天)
Same Name Dōmyō-ten(同名天)
Sandalwood Virtue Sendantoku(栴檀徳仏)
Shore of Suffering Kugan(苦岸比丘)
Snow Mountains Sessen-dōji(雪山童子)
Sorrow-Dispelling Virtue Mu’utoku(無憂徳仏)
Space Treasury Kokūzō(虚空蔵菩薩)
Spotted Feet Hanzoku(班足王)
Sun Goddess Tenshō Daijin(天照太神)
Sunlight Nikkō(日光菩薩/日光王)
Sun Moon Bright Nichigatsu Tōmyō(日月燈明仏)
Sun Moon Pure Bright Virtue Nichigatsu Jōmyōtoku(日月浄明徳仏)
Superior Intent Shōi(勝意比丘)
Superior Practices Jōgyō(上行菩薩)
Superlative Truth Appearing Shōgishō(勝義生菩薩)
Three Vehicle Practice Sanjōgyō(三乗行仏)
Universal Brightness Fumyō(普明王)
Universal Practice Fuji(普事比丘)
Universal Worthy Fugen(普賢菩薩)
Upholder of the Nation Jikoku-ten(持国天)
Vast Myriad Virtue Kōshutoku(広衆徳仏)
Victorious Shō(勝)
Virtue Victorious Tokushō-dōji(徳勝童子)
Water Carrier Rusui(流水)
Water Holder Jisui(持水)
Wisdom Accumulated Chishaku(智積菩薩)
Wonderful Adornment Myōshōgon(妙荘厳王)
Wonderful Sound Myō’on(妙音菩薩)
Worthy of Upholding Ōji(応持菩薩)

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ESSENE.COM’S

DAY CONTEMPLATIVE FORCE:

THURSDAY EVENING ANGEL OF WISDOM, DESCEND UPON MY THINKING BODY AND ENLIGHTEN ALL MY THOUGHTS, SUPERIOR THOUGHTS. THURSDAY MORNING, ANGEL OF WATER, ENTER MY BLOOD AND GIVE THE WATERS OF LIFE TO MY WHOLE BODY, RIVERS, CREEKS, ETC. CIRCULATION. THE ESSENE TREE OF LIFE WITH THE MORNING AND EVENING COMMUNIONS; SEEK PEACE WITH MORNING COMMUNION FOR THURSDAY=ANGEL OF WATER=BLOOD, RIVERS, ETC.=CIRCULATION; SEEK PEACE WITH NOON CONTEMPLATION THURSDAY=MIND (THINKING BODY); SEEK PEACE WITH EVENING COMMUNIONS THURSDAY=ANGEL OF WISDOM=SUPERIOR THOUGHTS=THINKING BODY
THE ESSENE SCIENCE OF FASTING AND THE ART OF SOBRIETY GUIDE TO REGENERATION IN HEALTH AND DISEASE by EDMOND BORDEAUX SZEKELY

Essene Science of Fasting

EDMOND BORDEAUX SZEKELY

THE

ESSENE SCIENCE

OF FASTING

AND

THE ART OF SOBRIETY
GUIDE TO REGENERATION IN HEALTH AND DISEASE
by
EDMOND BORDEAUX SZEKELY

Book Design by Golondrina Graphics

Copyright@1990, by the International BiogenicSociety

Printed in the United States of America-All Rights Reserved

CONTENTS

Foreword

Fasting & Sobriety According to The Essene Gospel of Peace 7

Part One

THE ESSENE SCIENCE OF FASTING

Introduction 12

How to Fast 12

Is the Enema Unnatural? 17

Essential Points and Warnings 19

The Drinking of Water 24

Fasting and Longevity 26

Long Fasts 27

Conclusion 30

Part Two

THE ART OF SOBRIETY

The Revaluation of Cornaro 31

Sobriety as an Alternative to Fasting: 39

the Example of Luigi Cornaro

Cornaro’s Ideas on a Temperate and Healthful Life 42

Eating Little Makes Life Long 43

Guide to Health Through Sobriety 45

The Praise of Long Life 46

The Philosophy of Moderation 47

Heaven on Earth and Eternity:

The Essene Influence 49

FASTING AND SOBRIETY ACCORDING TO

THE ESSENE GOSPEL OF PEACE

I Fasting

Renew yourselves and fast. For I tell you truly, that Satan and his plagues may only be cast out by fasting and by prayer. Go by yourself and fast alone, and show your fasting to no man. The living God shall see it and great shall be your reward. And fast till all evils depart from you, and all the angels of our Earthly Mother come and serve you. For I tell you truly, except you fast, you shall never be freed from the power of Satan and from all diseases that come from Satan. Fast and pray fervently, seeking the power of the living God for your healing. While you fast, eschew the Sons of Men and seek our Earthly Mother’s angels, for he that seeks shall find.

The angels of air and of water and of sunlight are brethren. They were given to the Son of Man that they might serve him, and that he might go always from one to the other. Holy, likewise, is their embrace. They are indivisible children of the Earthly Mother, so do not you put asunder those whom earth and heaven have made one. Let these three brother angels enfold you every day and let them abide with you through all your fasting.

And it was by the bed of a stream, many sick fasted and prayed with God’s angels for seven days and seven nights. And great was their reward, because they followed Jesus’ words. And with the passing of the seventh day, all their sickness left them.

II Sobriety

So eat always from the table of God: the fruits of the trees, the grain and grasses of the field, the milk of beasts, and the honey of bees. For everything beyond these is of Satan, and leads by the way of sins and of diseases unto death. But the foods which you eat from the abundant table of God give strength and youth to your body, and you will never see disease. For the table of God fed Methuselah of old, and I tell you truly, if you live even as he lived, then will the God of the living give you also long life upon the earth as was his.

For I tell you truly, the God of the living is richer than all the rich of the earth, and his abundant table is richer than the richest table of feasting of all the rich upon the earth. Eat, therefore, all your life at the table of our Earthly Mother, and you will never see want. And when you eat at her table, eat all things even as they are found on the table of the Earthly Mother.

Take heed, therefore, and defile not with all kinds of abominations the temple of your bodies. Be content with two or three sorts of food, which you will find always upon the table of our Earthly Mother. And desire not to devour all things which you see round about you. For I tell you truly, if you mix together all sorts of food in your body, then the peace of your body will cease, and endless war will rage in you.

And when you eat, never eat unto fullness. Flee the temptations of Satan, and listen to the voice of God’s angels. For Satan and his power tempt you always to eat more and more. But live by the spirit, and resist the desires of the body. And your fasting is always pleasing in the eyes of the angels of God. So give heed to how much you have eaten when you are sated, and eat always less by a third.

Let the weight of your daily food be not less than a mina, but mark that it go not beyond two. Then will the angels of God serve you always, and you will never fall into the bondage of Satan and of his diseases. Trouble not the work of the angels in your body by eating often. For I tell you truly, he who eats more than twice in the day does in him the work of Satan. And the angels of God leave his body, and soon Satan will take possession of it. Eat only when the sun is highest in the heavens, and again when it is set. And you will never see disease, for such finds favor in the eyes of the Lord.

From the coming of the month of Ijar, eat barley; from the month of Sivan, eat wheat, the most perfect among all seed-bearing herbs. And let your daily bread be made of wheat, that the Lord may take care of your bodies. From Tammuz, eat the sour grape, that your body may diminish, and that Satan may depart from it. In the month of Elul, gather the grape that the juice may serve you as drink. In the month of Marchesvan, gather the sweet grape, sweetened and dried by the angel of sunshine, that it may increase your bodies, for the angels of the Lord dwell in them. You should eat figs rich in juice in the months of Ab and Shebat, and what remain, let the angel of sunshine keep them for you. Eat them with the meat of almonds in all the months when the trees bear no fruits. And the herbs which come after rain, these eat in the month of Thebet, that your blood may be cleansed of all your sins. And in the same month begin to eat also the milk of your beasts, because for th is did the Lord give the herbs of the fields to all the beasts which render milk, that they might with their milk feed man. For I tell you truly, happy are they that eat only at the table of God, and eschew all the abominations of Satan. Eat not unclean foods brought from far countries, but eat always that which your trees bear. For your God knows well what is needful for you, and where and when. And he gives to all peoples of all kingdoms for food that which is best for each. Eat not as the heathen do, who stuff themselves in haste, defiling their bodies with all manner of abominations.

For the power of God’s angels enters into you with the living food which the Lord gives you from his ‘royal table.

And chew well your food with your teeth, that it become water, and that the angel of water turn it into blood in your body. And eat slowly, as it were a prayer you make to the Lord. For I tell you truly, the power of God enters into you, if you eat after this manner at his table. For the table of the Lord is as an altar, and he who eats at the table of God, is in a temple. For I tell you truly, the body of the Sons of Man is turned into a temple, and their inwards into an altar, if they do the commandments of God. Wherefore, put naught upon the altar of the Lord when your spirit is vexed, neither think upon any one with anger in the temple of God. And enter only into the Lord’s sanctuary when you feel in yourselves the call of his angels, for all that you eat in sorrow, or in anger, or without desire, becomes a poison in your body. For the breath of Satan defiles all these. Place with joy your offerings upon the altar of your body, and let all evil thoughts depart from you when you receive into your body the power of God from his table.

Rejoice, therefore, always with God’s angels at their royal table, for this is pleasing to the heart of the Lord; and your life will be long upon the earth, for the most precious of the servants of God will serve you all your days: the Angel of joy.

(These are excerpts from The Essene Gospel of Peace, Book One)

Part One: The Essene Science of Fasting

INTRODUCTION

Fasting is the most ancient therapy of humanity. Even our forefathers observed that after some days of fasting, a recrudescence of vitality and vigor shows itself in the organism. Nature turns it to account for the purpose of accelerating the functions of elimination, while the marvelous economy of the organism profits by the rest afforded to the digestive functions and by the vital machine’s slackened activity resulting from the fast to cast off the impurities of the organism by every channel. In sickness, nature seeks to eliminate, then to eliminate more, and again more, until the choked-up ducts which are the vehicles of vitality and energy are made free and good health is re-established. And it is only when elimination is complete and all the embarrassing waste products of the organism have been evacuated, that hunger, exquisite and natural, appears.

On several occasions enthusiasts have embarked on a fast without having studied the question sufficiently or without having accurate ideas on the physiology of the body. They have injured the idea of therapy through fasting in the minds of people by incorrect application of an excellent method.

There are some kinds of fasts which must be wholly condemned: irrational fasts, fasts without preparation, fasts of long duration without an experienced guide, and fasts which are only inspired by the wish to follow a system momentarily in vogue.

The purpose of this book is to give a dialectical guide to all who want to profit by this most ancient therapy of mankind, without making mistakes in its application.

HOW TO FAST

In general, official medicine looks on fasting as a bad and even dangerous thing for the human organism and regards it as the equivalent of starvation. There is some truth in the official viewpoint, but we cannot accept it in its totality, for as it stands it is extreme. At the other end of the pole, certain naturist systems consider fasting to be the high spot of therapeutics and as the best method of cure. I know some very good and reputable naturopaths who make all their patients fast, and who say that by fasting every disease is curable. This concept has a great deal of truth in it, but we must reject it also as extreme. it is true that very often fasting produces excellent results, but there are many cases when a fast, particularly a long fast, may result in accidents and even in disaster. We must therefore examine carefully the problem of fasting from the point of view of physiology.

What happens in the organism during a fast? We know that a great part of the energy of the organism is absorbed by the work of digestion. When we do not introduce food into the organism, then those forces of the organism which are generally absorbed by the work of digestion are freed. And the forces of the organism which are usually paralyzed by the struggle against waste products introduced into the system, and occupied with the elimination of superfluities and fermentations provoked by an irrational diet, are liberated by the rest which fasting secures.

The organism begins to feed upon its own reserves and the liberated forces begin to eliminate various old local accumulations and deposits of waste products, which the organism when occupied with the daily influx of superfluities has neither the energy nor the time to do. During a fast this eliminative process goes on with accentuated intensity. In view of all these useful physiological processes provoked by a fast, we can consider fasting as an excellent therapeutic method. Both from the point of view of the intensity of the metabolic processes which it occasions and from that of the results which it obtains, I do not know of any therapeutic method which can be so effective as the fast.

It is sad, but none the less true, that generally we eat very much more than is necessary for the organism as regards both quantity and quality. Fasting is a good counterbalancing factor against the various alimentary excesses which by our unnatural mode of life we accumulate in the organism. As a general rule more people die of overeating than from malnutrition. And even where the excess food material does not consist of toxic disease-forming material, there is, at the least, a great mass of starchy and fatty substance deposited in the body. Fasting is a radical cure which counterbalances the evil effects of overeating and unwise choice of food. If people were to feed upon a healthy diet and not to overeat, then I should not advise fasting as a therapeutic method, as it would be unnecessary. But since people do, fasting is a very valuable therapy. The value of fasting must always depend on the concrete case. The value and significance of the fast are relative. Those naturopaths wh o advocate fasting are right for the reason that people are over-nourished. But if they would eat exactly the right diet in quality and quantity, then these naturopaths would no longer be right. The value and significance of fasting thus depends on present habits of eating.

In the future, when man has a healthy diet in both quantity and quality, we shall perhaps no longer be able to say the same of the value of the fast. But fasting is truly very valuable in cases of overeating and in the case of disease caused by over-nourishment.

Now let us consider how to fast. We must pay attention to certain factors which limit both the duration of the fast and its intensity.

First, we will deal with the question of the duration of the fast. When we fast, there are two chief parallel physiological processes going on in the organism. First, there is the dissolution and elimination of the excesses and superfluities of the organism, and secondly there is the exhaustion of the vital cells and reserves of the organism. These are two parallel processes. The most interesting thing in the physiology of the fast is that the organism first eliminates those parts of the organism which are unhealthy, and only when unhealthy tissues have disappeared, does it begin to consume healthy cells and tissues. This fundamental physiological law of fasting gives us the essential rule to be observed in the fast. We must only fast up to the moment when the elimination of accumulated waste products and diseased cells is complete. We must always stop the fast at this point, before the organism starts to exhaust its healthy cells and tissues, which are necessary for the vital func tioning of the organism.

Those who exaggerate in fasting often go beyond this stage in the fast, with the result that progressive starvation and even death may ensue. This extremism is unfortunate, for it only brings prejudice against a method of cure which is really very sound. The number of enemies of fasting is unnecessarily increased.

There are also certain derivative rules which change with the individual case. Sometimes an organism is too intoxicated, and the dissolution and stirring up of waste products creates too strong and intensive an elimination. if this happens, the various excretive and eliminative organs cannot keep up with the accelerated rhythm of elimination, and it may happen that this very heightened elimination will exercise such an intensive chemical fermentative influence upon the organism that it can paralyze the activity of various important organs and so cause very serious irregularities and even death. Therefore a fast may be justified from one point of view, but not from another. The result of the over-intoxication of the organism may be that the manifested chemical energy of the latent toxins overcomes the power of resistance of the internal organs. In these cases, it is highly recommended, before undertaking a fast, to follow for a few months a well balanced, purifying and detoxifying d iet, such as outlined in The Essene Science of Life.* This is the second chief rule of fasting.

*by Edmond Bordeaux Szekely, available from the International Biogenic Society.

The first law, as was mentioned above, is the quantitative law that the duration of the fast should depend on the quantity of unhealthy cells and tissues present in the organism, while the second law of fasting is the qualitative law which says that the intensity of the elimination should depend on the force of the latent chemical energies of the accumulated harmful waste products present in the organism.

if we examine those cases where fasting has resulted in accident or death, we shall find that they have invariably occurred from non-observance of these two fundamental laws of fasting.

The manner in which one fasts is also very important. I have seen individuals who have fasted remaining shut up in a room. This is not at all an optimal way of fasting. When the organism fasts, it does not receive its customary source of energy from the body, so it is necessary to utilize other sources of energy: deep inhalations of sun-irradiated air, which refresh the nerves, pulmonary cells and circulation of the blood. A large amount of oxygen introduced into the organism aids the oxidation of harmful waste products and increases the eliminative capacity of the lungs, thus preventing possible local accumulations of gas.

Similarly, frequent washing of the skin also increases the capacity for respiration of the epidermis. When there is a large amount of oxygen flowing through the skin, this has the same effect as oxygen inhaled through the lungs. And various noxious substances are likewise removed through the skin. The internal dynamic forces of the fast and the chemical and metabolic energies released by it drive from within to without the various superfluous and unfavorable substances of the organism. These all flow in the direction of the skin. if, during a fast, we wash the skin two, three or even four times a day, we shall always find that the color of the water is much darker than when we are not fasting.

The external washing of the skin also has a refreshing influence on the organism. Sun-baths alternated with water-baths also very greatly help the process of elimination. The sun’s rays have a bactericidal and fermenticidal influence. Its chemical rays traverse the whole organism and, passing through the cells, greatly help the process of elimination. The rays of the sun, provided they are used always in moderation, also represent a source of thermic energy for the organism, which replaces the warmth generally supplied by food. It is very pleasant for the organism to have the sun as a source of warmth, for generally during a fast the person fasting is more inclined to feel the cold.

IS THE ENEMA NATURAL?

Another application during the fast is the washing of the intestines. The question of the enema is a cause of great disputes among naturists and naturopaths. There are those who say that the enema is an entirely unnatural thing. They say that animals living in a state of nature never have such a tliing. They also hold that enemas remove certain mucus material from the lining of the intestines and for this reason, too, they disapprove of them. To them I would answer: Is the consumption of refined and processed foods, laden with chemical additives and preservatives, a natural thing? Have we ever seen wild animals eating cooked food, or white sugar and white flour? We have not. It is natural, therefore, that they should not require enemas. Nor would human beings need them if we were to live naturally. But if we have introduced unnatural things into our bodies, then we have to eliminate them. One unnatural custom breeds another.

During a fast, a great quantity of harmful waste products and other superfluous substances enter the intestines and accumulate there. if they are not eliminated, these substances can create an intense fermentation which can exercise such a local pressure on particular organs and general pressure on the nervous system as to give rise to dangerous consequences, having regard to the general weakness of the organism during a fast.

If we take an enema during a fast, we cannot fail to remark the dense color of the liquid discharged, its contents and smell, from which it is easy to see that it would be less advantageous to leave such material in the intestines than to remove it with the help of a little plain water. If we do not take an enema, all this matter is left in the intestines, with the result that the organism must make a great effort to eliminate all these substances by the usual channels of excretion. This unduly taxes the strength of the organism and also immensely extends the duration of the fast. The longer such substances remain in the organism, the slower the metabolism becomes, and no complete elimination of additional poisons is possible for some time. But as soon as we eliminate them by the enema, then the internal forces of the fast immediately produce new eliminatory secretions. The enema may be repeated to advantage every day of the fast.

In view of our unnatural habits, I do not consider an enema at all unnatural. Fasting itself is not natural, for nourishment is a natural process and its suppression is not. But when we have been unnatural in our eating, then we must counterbalance and repair it by other unnatural applications, by fasting and enemas. Whether a thing is natural or unnatural is relative. If we did not have an unnatural diet, resulting in excess, superfluous matter clogging the organism, then fasting and enemas would both be unnatural. But since there is superfluous matter accumulated in the organism, then fasting and enemas must be regarded as necessary and even natural processes, for we must help nature get rid of the harmful waste products in the organism. Elimination is a natural proccss which we must always help. Of course we do not see animals in the forest fasting and taking enemas, but neither do they deviate from the laws of nature regarding their diet. For the completely denatured individual living in our present artificial civilization, an enema as an adjunct to successful fasting is a very necessary thing.

The effect of having an unnatural diet for some years is that the intestines are full of unwholesome matter and inferior fermentations. In such an environment, a large number of parasites, both visible and invisible, multiply constantly. in most cases, evacuation of the bowels is not regular or normal and the waste matter is never entirely discharged from the intestines. It is for this reason, particularly in the large intestines, but in the others as well, that inferior stratified layers are formed.

The nutritive juices are absorbed into the organism through the inner surface of the intestines and consequently they always reach the blood infected with this fermented liquid in the intestines. As a result, all the juices of our cellular life are infected in turn and this condition increases our liability to disease.

The microbes of the inferior fermentations multiply by division, and though they are due to a previous flesh diet, they and all their parasites continue to thrive even in the contents of the intestines derived from a vegetarian diet and may remain for several years. They can therefore form the permanent precondition of contagious diseases.

For all these reasons, the enema is necessary at the beginning of our new life. After the fermentations, former parasites and harmful waste products have been eliminated, the intestinal system will regain its vitality and elasticity, particularly if, at the same time as we adopt the new natural diet, we begin the renewal of the body. if we do, normal absorption of the nutritive juices is a certainty. Where reform of life follows on an unnatural diet extending over dozens of years, the intestines should be washed out every day for a week. At the beginning of a fast, the enema may be taken morning or evening, but not less than eight hours after the last meal. After only a few days there will be an improvement in the complexion, indicating the cleansing process within.

ESSENTIAL POINTS AND WARNINGS

The next question is how to know when it is time to end the fast and also what food to eat before and after it. in order to give the answer to both these questions we must examine a little the physiology of fasting. During the first and second days of a fast we have a very good appetite, which makes fasting somewhat difficult, but usually on about the third day the appetite disappears and a white layer forms on the tongue. Nature is closing the road to foods. When the organism has eliminated all the superfluous substances then the white layer on the tongue disappears and a natural appetite returns. This event indicates the end of the fast. It means that we must start eating again. This is the symptom which marks the time when we should end the fast, but naturally this is only a general rule. There are certain special exceptions to it. In case of great weakness of the organism the fast must sometimes be interrupted earlier on. We must also suspend the fast in the case where the liberated chemical energy of the accumulated toxins necessitates a slackening of the elimination.

We must make certain preparations for the fast. A person eating all the usual “civilized” foods, including meat and other toxic substances, would, if he were to start a fast after such a meal, experience alarming symptoms. He would have intestinal gas, strong intestinal and gastric fermentations and other discomforts. in such a case the sudden commencement of a fast can cause severe irregularities and dangers. it would therefore be advisable to follow a wholesome, natural diet for a few months (as previously mentioned), and then begin the fast only after two or three days upon an exclusive diet of fresh juicy fruit. Nature does not like sudden changes, so between the customary digestive pattern of the stomach and the strong elimination occasioned by fasting, we should interpolate a transitional period of moderate elimination. in this way, alarming symptoms at the beginning of a fast can be avoided. Yet these will only be postponed, for it is very rare to be able to fast for many da ys without having symptoms, which are the punishment for our past sins. Through them we pay our debts we owe to nature. The person fasting may experience periodic dizziness, and strange black objects may appear in front of the eyes. He may feel extremely weak, or cold, or irritable, or even lose consciousness for a few seconds. Such symptoms very often accompany fasting.

What is the explanation of these phenomena? During a fast the most important role is played by the circulation of the blood. The circulating blood dissolves old accumulations in various parts of the body and in the skin. Its circulation becomes saturated with these chemical accumulations, which from time to time are carried by the blood through certain nerves, thereby occasioning these sensations of blackness, irritability, depression, or momentary loss of consciousness. There is no need to be afraid of these things, for they come and go.

Another symptom during a fast is a change in the color and texture of the urine: it becomes denser and undergoes strange permutations of color, turning yellow, red and sometimes green. And if the urine is left standing for a day, considerable deposits will be found at the bottom of the bottle. This shows the effect of fasting, providing proof that the organism requires a fast, and that elimination is going on within the organism. Similar accumulations form on the lining of the intestines and also on the surface of the skin, for which reason washing of the skin and of the intestines is recommended. Also, the breath has a bad smell, as there is a considerable elimination of various gases through the lungs. The salivary glands also take part in this elimination, and the person fasting feels compelled to spit. The saliva itself contains eliminative matter. The economy of the human organism does not desire that this should remain within, so it impels the patient to spit it out. All thin gs considered, fasting is not exactly pleasant, but it is extremely useful and necessary, and the temporary inconvenience is more than compensated for by the anticipation of future vibrant health and well-being.

Those who undertake a fast should withdraw into a natural environment and fast in the open air, with sunshine in moderation and plenty of shade. They should get away from the temptations of the outer world, for the sake of both themselves and those around them. it is better to go away and fast by oneself, in order to avoid tempting foods, well-meaning interference, etc., which may cause one to break the fast. “When you are all alone, you are all your own,” said Leonardo da Vinci. one should seek the company of fresh air, water and sunshine (in moderation), reading the various volumes of The Essene Gospel of Peace,* in order to be psychologically and spiritually fortified. A fast is an excellent time to open oneself up to the absorption of new sources of energy, harmony and knowledge.

How should the fast be ended? it should end much as it began, but instead of taking juicy fruits for the first meal, simply a glassful of fresh fruit juice eaten with a small teaspoon should be taken. This should be thoroughly mixed with the saliva. The interruption or termination of a fast with meat or even any concentrated or nourishing food can have catastrophic results. It is most important to end the fast with fresh fruit juice, preferably from fruit which is organically grown and ripened in the sun. Such fruit contains the most superior water, rich in organic mineral salts, vitamins, enzymes and the accumulated energies of the sun. After two or three hours, one can take a second glass of juice, and so on. The following day, in addition to the fruit juice, one can add some fresh fruit, and a tender, vegetable salad, composed of ripe, juicy vegetables in season, such as cucumbers and tomatoes, in small amounts and chewed extremely well. it cannot be emphasized strongly e nough that all the food taken immediately after the fast must be eaten in very small amounts, must be chewed and mixed with the saliva thoroughly, and must, above all, be fresh and raw. Following this pattern, gradually one can eat more nutritive foods until normal weight is reached. It is hoped that one might never return to pre-fast eating habits, but follow instead a diet of fresh, raw fruits and vegetables, whole grains, nuts, seeds, sprouts, fresh raw milk and eggs (these last only if available pure and fresh), and so keep the organism healthy.*

*Translated by the author, available from the International Biogenic Society.

After fasting, the human organism is like a dry sponge; it has a more intensive capacity for absorption than at other times. It is, therefore, most important to pay great attention to what is eaten in the first days and weeks succeeding the fast. During the fast, the organism will have lost much superfluous weight. Afterwards it reconstructs, and the person who has been fasting will gain weight very rapidly. The organism absorbs everything for use in the reconstruction of new cells. if, therefore, unhealthy foods are eaten after fasting, the organism will be built of unwholesome material, and much of the benefit of the fast will be lost. On the other hand, if the organism is reconstructed after the fast with wholesome materials, then the new cells will be of the finest quality. In the few weeks succeeding a fast, raw foods rich in vitamins and enzymes should be eaten in preference to cooked, for in that way the organism can construct new cells more perfectly. Once the natural weigh t has been regained, then one can begin to eat in moderation the various cooked foods which one is accustomed to. I do not generally advise eating cooked foods at all. I am in favor of a raw diet. Those who read my numerous books on health and nutrition will realize the superiority of raw foods, containing all the valuable enzymes, plant hormones, vitamins and other imponderables. But those who are not in the habit of following a raw diet, and who do not have the will power to adhere to a completely raw regime, should at least do so during the week after the fast, i’n order that the reconstruction of the organism may be completed in the best possible way. After that, the disadvantage of eating cooked foods is less, for once the cells of the organism have been reconstructed, it can more easily eliminate the superfluous by-products of cooked foods. In later weeks, the organism is not using everything for reconstruction, but at the end of the fast it utilizes everything, absorbing like a dry sponge. This is why the new cells should be constructed with only the finest building materials from nature’s table of wholesome raw foods.

*See The Chemistry of Youth, by Edmond Bordeaux Szekely, available from the International Biogenic Society

The same foods have a very different effect upon the body before and after fasting. Before a fast, the organism uses a very small part of the food ingested and eliminates the major part, without much increase in weight generally taking place. But after a fast, a meal of juicy fruit will increase considerably the weight of the body. The organism has quite a different capacity for absorption before and after fasting. This increased absorptive capacity continues for some days.

Fasting is good for those who are healthy, provided it is not exaggerated. Extremes of temperature should be avoided. it is not advisable to fast in cold weather, for then it is necessary to stay in a warm room, which lacks fresh air. On the other hand, when it is very hot, excessive thirst is provoked in the organism and that, too, is not very agreeable for the person fasting. A pleasant temperature, neither too hot nor too cold, is best.

THE DRINKING OF WATER

There is another very interesting problems. Should one drink water during a fast, or not? This is another great point of dispute amongst naturists. There are those who advise so-called “dry fasts,” during which nothing is drunk at all, while others give the patient as much as several gallons of water a day. Without knowledge of the individual case, both extremes can be bad. A little water during the fast is very good, for it helps the dissolution of the accumulated toxins and cleanses the internal parts of the organism; but too much can be a mistake.

Those opposed to water drinking say that fasting provokes increased oxidation in the organism, with a resulting consumption of harmful waste products, and that drinking, as it were, puts out the fire. There are arguments for and against this view. Every problem has two sides.

The answer in every case depends on common sense and the particular individual. There are organisms which have an excess of liquid, and in such cases it would be folly to give more liquid during the fast, for the organism has sufficient work to do to get rid of its own liquid. Excess of water during a fast does indeed suppress the process of oxidation in the organism and gives it superfluous work to do. The organism is thereby prevented from using up its own accumulated liquid, which in the majority of cases is not at all a vital or wholesome liquid. in these cases, the effect of the fast is greater if no drinks are taken. The drying-up of the organism in these cases is very useful, for the excess liquid derives from overeating of highly concentrated foods. It is good to replace this surplus liquid of inferior quality with the fresh fruit juice taken after the fast. On the other hand, there are persons with comparatively dry organisms, and in these cases it is quite a good thing to help the organism with a little water. These cases can be allowed about four glasses of water a day, but not the gallons of water prescribed by certain naturopaths. When a small amount of water is permissible, it is important that it be pure, fresh and unchlorinated.

I have often observed a very great regeneration effected in the organisms of quite old people by proper fasting. Various symptoms occur. For instance, the color of the hair may change, becoming darker, while in the case of baldness, new hair may grow. Often in certain cases teeth are renewed. A good fast, properly commenced and properly terminated, followed by a proper reconstruction of the organism with superior new material (fresh, raw fruits and vegetables, whole grains, sprouts, etc.) often effects almost miraculous changes in the organism. I have observed this in a great number of cases of the almost 124,000 patients I treated during a third of a century of “The Great Experiment”* at the Essene School of Life at Rancho La Puerta, applying the Essene Biogenic principles of nutrition and fasting, without any adverse effect or accident.

*See Search ‘for the Ageless, Volume Two: 7he Great Experiment, by Edmond Bordeaux Szekely, available from the International Biogenic Society.

The person who fasts does not rely on doctors nor on drugs for a cure; he undertakes his own healing, relying on the powers latent in his own body, having complete faith in the laws of nature. Thus a fast may prove to be not only an ancient and time-tested method of healing, but also a bridge to greater awareness and self-knowledge.

FASTING AND LONGEVITY

Saint Paul, the anchorite, who died at the age of 113 years, ate only dates and drank nothing but water. Saint Anthony died at the age of 105 and was content to live on bread, water and a few herbs for ninety years.

We may also refer to the cases of Calcas, from Peru, who died in 1761 at the age of 140; of Pari, from Chile, whom Alexander Humboldt relates having seen at the age of 143; of Louise Truxo, who died in 1780 at the age of 175; of Joss Moreira and Sabina of Lemos, both of Brazil, who died at the age of 115, in 1869 and 1872, respectively.

In our present day we have the remarkable example of the Georgian peasants of the Caucasus, a great many of whom have reached the age of 120 years in splendid health.

All the examples of long living, such as Thomas Carn and Jenkins, instinctively followed the laws of nature. They did not eat cooked foods at all, they ate very little, and their foods were simple and wholesome. In their rare falls from grace, their constant abstemiousness made their organisms immune and able to resist and eliminate inferior processes. The results they obtained were not in consequence of a knowledge of the laws of nature; they only partially followed the law according to the promptings of their organisms. Sobriety became their habit. Because they died only through accident, their age at the time of death was not the extreme limit of their possibilities, as Thomas Carn, for instance, lived to be 207. The Countess Desmond Catherine lived to the age of 145; she ate practically nothing but fruit, led a simple life, and kept her beauty till the last years of her life, according to Sir Walter Raleigh’s History of the World. Of the books on longevity the most inter esting works are Macrobiotics of Hufeland, and L’Almanac de la Vieillesse et des Centenaires ou Dur6e de la Vie Humaine, jusqu’d cent ans et au dela, d6montr6 par des exemples sans nombres, tant anciens que modernes, by Augustin, Marie Lottin, Paris, 1761 to 1772 (12 vols. each of 460 pages). it is liere we find the biography of Jenkins who was born in Yorkshire in 1500 and died in 1670 at Bolton. At a very advanced age he was in excellent physical condition. His two sons both lived to be over a hundred. His life was of the simplest. He never ate in the morning, he always lunched between one and two o’clock on milk or butter with honey and fruit. In the evening he had only milk or fruit for supper, and once in a great while cooked corn meal with the milk. He drank river water, he was very abstemious, and he fasted on several occasions.

All the long-livers were vegetarians, eating very little and only once or at the most twice a day. Thomas Carn lived in the same way as Jenkins and exceeded even his age. His diet was milk products, bread and fruits. He was born in London in 1588 and died in 1795, surviving twelve kings of England. Of the opposite sex the oldest was Charlotte Dessen of Temesvar, the wife of jean Rovin. The former was 164 and the latter 172 when they died. The marriage lasted 147 years. From childhood they were very frugal eaters and lived almost exclusively on milk and corn bread.

Generally speaking, all those who live long are altruists and optimists. They know neither hatred nor envy. in addition to their practice of periodic fasts, and their fine diet of natural foods, they also know the value of a good diet in thoughts and emotions.

LONG FASTS

People without the necessary physiological knowledge, or unable to understand the language of their- own organism, should not undertake a prolonged fast without the of someone skilled in the physiology of fasting. I have met people who, after reading a book on fasting, have embarked on a fast of undue length, without sufficient knowledge of the technique of fasting. Such people get bad rather than good results, and accidents are liable to occur. Experienced advice is very necessary where a long fast is contemplated.

I do not usually recommend long fasts. As a general rule, it is good to fast one day a week, unless there is some particular reason against it. But I do not advise long fasts for inexperienced people; they do much more harm than good, and afterwards raise a prejudice against natural methods and the therapeutics of fasting. There is an old Latin proverb which says: “One careless friend can do more harm than a hundred enemies.” Similarly, fanatical naturists very often do far more harm to the reputation of natural methods than do those who openly declare themselves opposed to fasting and other natural therapies.

For instance, there is the type who, after reading a book on fasting, proclaims that he is going to fast for forty days, as Jesus did. When asked if he has already carried out long fasts, he replies that he has not, but that he is certain that he can manage it. Despite warnings, and advice to confine the fast to three days, he goes away and starts his fast. He fasts one day, perhaps two, three, four, five, or even six days; but on the seventh day a terrific hunger comes upon him and he begins to eat everything in enormous quantities. He practically eats the walls of the house-cooked foods, meat, etc., forgetting all his fine resolutions. The organism absorbs everything after a fast, so he reconstructs his organism with the same bad things as before. Then, after barely escaping serious illness from his post-fast eating binge, he declares that prolonged fasting is only for certain individuals, but not for him, and he never fasts again.

Then there is another type. This type comes along and says: “I am used to prolonged fasts of one or two weeks. Tomorrow I will start my two weeks’ fast. I have done this

two or three times already.” But if by chance you pay an unexpected call on him, you will either find him eating or else in the act of disposing of some half-eaten food. Such people only make a game of fasting, but they like to assume the role of being great fasters.

Then there are those who for religious and metaphysical reasons wish to fast. They imagine that the longer one fasts, the more perfect the organism will be. They think that their organisms will become more etheric and refined, and that finally they will become. Like the angels. As to this angelic transformation I cannot comment, but if they continue to follow such a program they will certainly become disembodied. This type can be really dangerous, for those numbered in it are very obstinate and refuse all food. They adopt the attitude that since Jesus fasted for forty days they also must fast for forty days. Besides the obvious fact that the individual capacities of these people are generally much lower than those of Jesus, they seem to ignore the fact that human beings were designed to partake of the wholesome and delicious foods from the table of nature, and while eating is a natural and joyous daily necessity, prolonged fasting is a radical therapy to be used only when absolutel y necessary, and then only under expert supervision. I am reminded of a little slogan I saw during the second World War, at the time of gasoline rationing: “Is this trip necessary?” The medical term for this pathological loss of appetite is anorexia, and very often these people can continue to refuse food until they starve and die. In a world where famine is a stark reality for millions, such intentional starvation is not only tragic, but somewhat tragicomic. But these are the people who bring much prejudice to fasting. The allopathic physicians who are opposed to fasting catch hold of these cases and write articles attacking natural methods, which they make responsible for the antics of these illogical and senseless creatures. There are always fanatical and dogmatic individuals who exaggerate every good thing, thereby robbing it of its value.

CONCLUSION

There is one last point on the physiology of fasting. Generally speaking, the more intoxicated the organism is, the harder it is for a person to fast, while the more detoxicated and more perfect the organism is, then the easier it is for that organism to fast. If a person has already fasted many times in the past, he can fast much more easily than one who has not fasted before. The more one fasts, the easier ‘ it is to fast, for each new renewal of the cells of the organism results in a greater capacity for fasting. On the whole, as I have already mentioned, I do not advise prolonged fasts for the majority of individuals, since they are not able to realize the right conditions for carrying them out. I therefore usually advise only periodic short fasts of two or three days’ duration, and only in those cases where no special factors make them undesirable. In the majority of cases one day’s fasting a week is quite feasible. it is best done o n a day when the person is free and can seek out some sun, fresh air and fresh water, not so easy if one lives in a city (which is why cities are not ideal dwelling-places for human beings). Those who find it difficult to fast one day a week can begin by undertaking a half-day’s fast. They can fast for lunch and eat only in the evening. Even a short fast helps the organism very greatly, and little by little they will become able to fast for a whole day. This is the most sensible and practical way of fasting in the circumstances of ordinary life, particularly when at work, or where it is impossible to have fresh air, sun and water.

In conclusion, I hope that I have made one thing above all very clear: that fasting must be adapted to the individual case, and each person is totally unlike another, each with a different background, a different medical history, different health conditions, heredity, etc., all having a bearing on how and when to fast, and for how long. But if common sense and reason are applied, it will be seen that every question can be answered.

Part Two: The Art of Sobriety

THE REVALUATION OF CORNARO

There have been very few people in history so misunderstood and consequently misinterpreted by their contemporaries, as well as by posterity, as Luigi Cornaro.

His contemporaries looked with great astonishment on this vigorous, creative centenarian with his permanently benevolent, smiling face and countenance, so radically unlike themselves, at least those who were still alive when Cornaro celebrated his one-hundredth birthday, for the average life-span in the latter part of the 16th century was only forty to fifty years. The few who remained to wonder at Cornaro’s well-being were vegetating in agonizing pains, chained to their beds, waiting only for death to release them from their sufferings. And this generally one-sided (though accurate) image survived all the centuries (he lived from 1464 to 1566). To many of his contemporaries, he was the respectable and highly esteemed administrator of the Bishopric of Padua and the intimate friend of the highly revered Cardinal Pisani. Several of his friends regarded him with even greater awe, knowing that two other long-lived celebrities, Pope Paul Farnese and Cardinal Bembo, both had become follo wers of Cornaro’s way of living and eating. To the less knowledgeable citizens and neighbors of Cornaro, he was simply the wealthy and eccentric nobleman who lived in a pleasant house in the most beautiful quarter of the city of Venice, the grounds of which were enhanced by several beautiful gardens, intersected by running streams, “in which he always found pleasure of exercising, surrounded by pure air, water, sunshine, and beautiful trees and vegetation.”

His niche of fame in the annals of posterity is also limited and not less one-sided. He was considered by many as a 16th century author of several classic treatises, most of which are still gathering dust in the ancient archives and libraries of Italy, holding no special interest for modern times. Regarding his literary form, the most fastidious critics extolled his beautiful style in both Latin and Italian. But concerning the rather “eccentric content” of his letters and treatises, very few comments were written.

Then, in the 19th and 20th centuries, something much worse happened to his image: he was suddenly acclaimed as the forerunner of Naturopathy and diet therapy, hailed as a fanatical, one-sided opponent of “orthodox medical science” of his age as well as the present one. “Selected” texts of his were atrociously translated in several languages and used as vulgar arguments for many one-sided medical sects and their representatives.

But the historical figure, the mind and personality of the great Luigi Cornaro cannot be evaluated from such one-sided interpretations. in the words of Lucretius, cognoscere est cognoscere causes. To know, we must know the origins. Therefore, let us analyze not only the character, the mind and the extraordinary erudition of Luigi Cornaro, but also the origin and sources of his remarkable philosophy of life.

The influences on the formation of his philosophy and way of living and eating were several. When I did my research in the archives of the Vatican and in the Benedictine monastery of Monte Cassino, I found very interesting material by and referring to Cornaro, as well as numerous letters and marginal notes on books and manuscripts in his own hand.

He was well acquainted with the writings of Hippocrates, the father of western medicine, who said, “let food be your medicine, and medicine be your food.” After reading his marginal notes on the Treatises of Hippocrates on the airs, waters and nature, he does not seem so eccentric for spending so much time in his gardens. He also seemed to follow the advice of his favorite poet, Horatius, who said bene vixit qui bene latuit. He who hides well, lives well.

in one of his letters to Cardinal Bembo, he quotes Hippocrates several times, especially in these immortal words: “Life is short, and Art is long; opportunity fleeting, experiment dangerous, and judgment difficult.” And again: “I will impart the Art of Healing by precept, by lecture and by every mode of teaching to all my disciples.”

In another letter, criticizing the deviations of contemporary physicians from the basic principles of Hippocrates, he quotes the following words of the Father of Medicine, in order to keep his illustrious follower on the narrow path: “The regimen I adopt shall be for the benefit of my patients, according to my ability and judgment, and not for any wrong. I will give no drug to any, though it be asked of me, nor will I counsel such. Whatsoever house I enter, there will I go for the benefit of the sick, refraining from all wrongdoing. Whatsoever things I see or hear, concerning the life of men, in my attendance on the sick or even apart therefrom which ought not to be noised abroad, I will keep in silence thereon, counting such things to be as sacred secrets.”

He also made very interesting annotations on the texts of Galenus, the greatest follower of Hippocrates. Among them: “So long as we follow these two rules: not to take of more than our stomach can easily digest, and to use only those things which agree with us, we shall not suffer from disease.”

He also quotes Socrates in one of his letters to Pope Paul Fa.rnese: “Whenever we follow the path of reason, everything will be satisfactory; but, as soon as we deviate from the path of reason, everything in our lives will go wrong.” In another letter, this time to Cardinal Bembol he quotes extensively from Zeno, the classic Greek founder of the Stoic school of philosophy: “See that you live in harmony with your own reasonable nature, instead of acting unreasonably according to your own caprice. There lies your part and your happiness, for in that way you can avoid every collision with Nature and with the order of the Universe. Thus you can be assured of a pleasant and quiet life. We shall strive to achieve ataraxia, the undisturbed peace of mind before the turmofl of this world.”

He also underlined in a manuscript this beautiful statement of Epicuros: “We shall seek temperance and a simple life.

Real wealth and freedom consists in a minimum of needs.” But his favorite statement of Epicuros, which he quotes in a letter to Cardinal Pisani is this: “We shall avoid pain, always, and seek for pleasure. But of pleasures there are two kinds: for the first, and false, pleasures, we must pay too high a price: the sacrifice of our physical health and peace of mind. And without our health and peace of mind we are unable to enjoy any pleasures. The second kind of pleasures are our eternal companions, the right kind of pleasures. These noble pleasures are the enjoyment of all beautiful things in Nature: the mountains, the forests, the oceans, the colors of the sunrise and sunset. . . all that is beautiful in man’s creation: great books, great music, great works of art, friendship and love. . . The wise man shall have as his program of living, the gradual replacement of the false pleasures with our eternal companions, the noble pleasures of life.”

He also knew very well the two disciples of Zeno, founder of the Stoic philosophy: Epictetus, the slave, and Marcus Aurelius, the emperor. One of his notes from Epictetus: “Do not be concerned by anything independent of our will, but strive to improve all things which depend on your mind.” A beautiful quotation of his from Marcus Aurelius may explain his serenity in the face of all his acquaintances and relatives, who lived their lives in violation of every rule of wisdom: “You cannot make people happy in your way; you must let them be happy, or unhappy, in their own way.”

Now we arrive to the analysis of that crucial moment in Cornaro’s life, his crossroads of decision, when he became deathly ill in the fifth decade of his “life of ignorance and dissipation.” All of Cornaro’s biographers, without exception, mention simply that it was “a physician” who led him to a new way of living, and thus to restored health, and never mention him again, leaving this most important influence on his life entirely in darkness. His notes and manuscripts published by his great-grandson, Antonio Cornaro, shed light on this most important person, who completely and radically changed the way of thinking, living and eating of Luigi Cornaro. The anonymous “physician” of Cornaro’s biographers was the most respected member of the surviving brotherhood of the Salerno Medical School, and a renowned physician: Father Benedict, professor of natural regime and Cornaro’s savior. He was sent to Cornaro’s sick-bed by his superior, Cardinal Bembo, to save the life of the most efficie nt administrator of his Bishopric. It was Father Benedict, from the Benedictine monastery of Monte Cassino, who visited Cornaro at the height of his misery and converted him “from Saulus to Paulus.” What happened then is common knowledge from the well-known treatises of Cornaro. The disciple outshone the master, who, according to the Benedictine ethic, intended to remain anonymous.

Let us now mention the greatest scholar of the famed medical school of Salerno: Constantin the African, who, after years of wandering in the eastern deserts, sought refuge in Salerno and then retired to Monte Cassino, the monastery founded by St. Benedict in the sixth century, there to translate many of St. jerome’s still surviving texts about the Therapeutae, an Essene Brotherhood from Lake Mareotis, Of enormous renown in their use of simple, natural nutrition in the greatest moderation. His best known work, a condensation of the regirne and methods of fasting and eating in moderation of the ancient Essenes (the “Desert Way”) was the Regimen Sanitatis Salernitanum, a handbook of domestic medicine, the most quoted couplet of which is the following: “Use three physicians still: first, Doctor Quiet, next Doctor Merryman, and Doctor Diet.”

The medical school of Salerno, mentioned several times, was the earliest and most famous in Europe, and to it flocked students from Europe, Asia and Africa, to study and qualify as doctors of medicine. Father Benedict, the anonymous physician of Cornaro, was one of the most illustrious lights of this famous school, in the 16th century.

The most fascinating discovery I made concerning the life and teachings of Cornaro is this chain of transmission of knowledge: the ancient Essene Brotherhoods and the Essene Gospel of Peace, St. jerome’s translation of the Essene Gospel of Peace, the Benedictine monastery of Monte Cassino, Constantin the African, the remnants of the texts of St. Jerome, the Salerno School of Medicine, Doctor Father Benedict, and Luigi Cornaro, the prophet of moderation in all things and of Sobriety, the last echo of the ancient Essene teachings and traditions.

I think it will be appropriate to end this revaluation with a quotation of a great intellectual giant, Francis Bacon, confirming the ideas of Cornaro: “To preserve long life, the body of Man must be considered. Age is nothing of itself, being only the measure of time. A sober diet according to strict rules and always exactly equal [as that of Cornaro] seemeth to be very effectual for long life. Certainly this is without all question: diet, well-ordered, bears the greatest part in the prolongation of life.”

“Hope is the most beneficial of all the affections, as it doth much for the prolongation of life, if it be not too often frustrated, but entertaineth the fancy with an expectation of good; therefore, they who will fix and propound to themselves some end-as the mark and scope of the inner life-and continually and by degrees go forward in the same, are, for the most part, long-lived.”

In conclusion, I want to emphasize my irresistible urge to overcome the prevalent one-sided image of Luigi Cornaro, who had one of the most all-sided, classic, eclectic minds of all time, with an encyclopedic erudition in all the available knowledge of his era. Most of all, he was a civilized human being, in the truest and finest sense of the word. Perhaps the feature which distinguishes him most markedly from 20th century man is his devotion to reason as the guiding force behind man’s decisions, as opposed to our modern indulgence of feelings and emotions. Present-day man finds it extremely difficult to give up even the least of his bad habits, no matter how impressive the scientific arguments against it. Yet Cornaro wholeheartedly adopted a regime so strict that even today no physician would hope to keep a patient on it for more than a few weeks, adhering to it with a serenity and cheerfulness more akin to the ancient Greek ideal than to modern western man. “. . . w hen I had once resolved to live soberly, and according to the dictates of reason, feeling it was my duty as a man to do so, I entered with so much resolution upon this new course of life, that nothing since has been able to divert me from it.” This may be what I admire most about Luigi Cornaro: he may have been the “man” whom Diogenes was looking for with a lamp in the marketplace of Athens in broad daylight, and was unable to find.

CORNARO’S IDEAS

ON A TEMPERATE AND HEALTHFUL LIFE

It is universally agreed, that custom, in time, becomes a second nature, forcing men to use that, whether good or bad, to which they have been habituated; in fact, we see habit, in many instances, gain the ascendancy over reason. This is so undeniably true, that virtuous men, by keeping company with wicked, often fall into the same vicious course of life. Seeing and considering all this, I have decided to write on the vice of intemperance in eating and drinking.

Now, though all are agreed that intemperance is the parent of gluttony, and sober living the offspring of abstemiousness; yet, owing to the power of custom, the former is considered a virtue, and the latter as mean and avaricious; and so many men are blinded and besotted to such a degree, that they come to the age of forty or fifty, burdened with strange and painful infirmities, which render them decrepit and useless; whereas, had they lived temperately and soberly, they would in all probability have been sound and hearty, to the age of eighty and upward. To remedy this state of things, it is requisite that men should live up to the simplicity dictated by nature, which teaches us to be content with little, and accustom ourselves to cat no more than is absolutely necessary to support life, remembering that all excess causes disease and leads to death. Many young men of the best understanding have recognized the necessity of following this way of life, because many of their pa rents have died in middle life, while I remain so sound and hearty at the age of one hundred and one.

The heavy train of infirmities which had made great inroads on my constitution, were my motives for renouncing intemperance, in the matter of too freely eating and drinking, to which I had been addicted, so that, in consequence of it, my stomach became disordered, and I suffered much pain from colic and gout, attended by that which was still worse, an almost continual slow fever, a stomach generally out of order, and a perpetual thirst. From these disorders, the best delivery I had to hope was death. Finding myself, therefore, between my thirty-fifth and fortieth year in such unhappy circumstances, and having tried everything that could be thought of to relieve me, but to no purpose, my physician gave me to understand that there was one method left to get the better of my complaints, provided I would resolve to use it, and patiently persevere. This was to live a strictly sober and regular life, which would be of the greatest efficacy. He further added that, if I did not at once ado pt this method of strict living, I should in a few months receive no benefit from it, and that in a few more I must resign myself to death.

These arguments made such an impression on me, that, mortified as I was, besides, by the thought of dying in the prime of life, though at the same time perpetually tormented by various diseases, I immediately resolved, in order to avoid at once both disease and death, to betake myself to a regular course of life. Having upon this inquired of him what rules I should follow, he told me that I must only use food, solid or liquid, such as is generally prescribed to sick persons; and both sparingly. These directions, to say the truth, I had been given before, but I had been impatient of such restraint, and had eaten and drunk freely of those things I had desired. But, when I had once resolved to live soberly, and according to the dictates of reason, feeling it was my duty as a man so to do, I entered with so much resolution upon this new course of life, that nothing since has been able to divert me from it. The consequence was, that in a few days I began to perceive that such a course a greed well with me; and, by pursuing it, I found myself in less than a year (some people, perhaps, will not believe it), entirely freed from all my complaints.

EATING LITTLE MAKES LIFE LONG

Having thus recovered my health, I began to seriously consider the power of temperance: if it had efficacy enough to subdue such grievous disorders as mine, it must also have power to preserve me in health and strengthen my bad constitution. I gave over the use of such meats and wines as did not suit me, and chose those which by experience I found agreed well with me, taking only as much as I could easily digest, having strict regard to quantity as well as quality; and contrived matters so as never to cloy my stomach with eating or drinking, and always rose from the table with a disposition to eat and drink more. In consequence, therefore, of my taking such methods, I have always enjoyed, and, God be praised, still enjoy, the best of health. It is true that, besides the two most important rules relative to eating and drinking, which I have ever been very scrupulous to observe (that is, not to take of either, more than my stomach could easily digest, and to use only those things which agree with me), I have carefully avoided, as far as possible, all extreme heat, Cold, extraordinary fatigue, interruption of my usual hours of rest, or staying long in bad air. I likewise did all that lay in my power, to avoid those evils, which we do not find it so easy to remove: melancholy, hatred, and other violent passions, which appear to have the most -profound influence on our bodies. I am a living witness, and so are many others who know me, and have seen me, how often I have been exposed to heats and colds, and disagreeable changes of weather, without taking harm. He who leads a sober and regular life, and commits no excess in his diet, can suffer but little from mental disorders or external accidents.

I conclude, especially from the late trial I have had, that excesses in eating and drinking are often fatal. Four years ago, I consented to increase the quantity of my food by two ounces, my friends and relations having, for some time past, urged upon me the necessity of such increase, that the quantity I took was too little for one so advanced in years; against this, I urged that nature was content with little, and that with this small quantity I had preserved myself for many years in health and activity, that I believed as a man

advanced in years, his stomach grew weaker, and therefore the tendency should be to lessen the amount of food rather than to increase. I further reminded them of the two proverbs, which say: He who has a mind to eat a great deal, must eat but little; eating little makes life long, and, living long, he must eat much; and the other proverb was: That which we leave after making a hearty meal does us more good than what we have eaten. But my arguments and proverbs were not able to prevent them teasing me upon the subject; therefore, not to appear obstinate, or affecting to know more than the physicians themselves, but above all, to please my family, I consented to the increase before mentioned; so that, whereas previous, what with bread, the yolk of an egg, and soup@ I ate as much as twelve ounces, neither more nor less, I now increased it to fourteen; and whereas before I drank but fourteen ounces of liquid, I now increased it to sixteen. This increase had, in eight day’ s time, such an effect upon me that, from being cheerful and brisk, I began to be peevish and melancholy, so that nothing could please me. On the twelfth day, I was attacked with a violent pain in my side, which lasted twenty-two hours and was followed by a fever, which continued thirty-five days without any respite, insomuch that all looked upon me as a dead man; but, God be praised, I recovered, and I am positive that it was the great regularity I had observed for so many years, and that only, which rescued me from the jaws of death.

GUIDE TO HEALTH THROUGH SOBRIETY

Orderly living is doubtless a most certain cause and foundation of health and long life; nay, I say it is the only true medicine, and whoever weighs the matter weU, will come to this conclusion. Hence it is, that when the physician comes to visit a patient, the first thing he prescribes is regular living, and certainly to avoid excess. Now, if the patient after recovery should continue so to live, he could not be sick again, and if a very small quantity of food is sufficient to restore his health, then but a slight addition is necessary for the continuance of the same; and so, for the future, he would want neither physician nor physic; he would become his own physician, and indeed, the best he could have, since, in fact, no man should be a perfect physician to any but himself. The reason is, that any man, by repeated trials, may acquire a perfect knowledge of his own constitution, the kinds of food and drink which agree with him best. A man cannot have a better guide than himself, nor any physic better than a regular life. We should consider this regular life as our physician, since it preserves men, even those of a weak constitution, in health; makes them live sound and hearty, to the age of one hundred and upward, and prevents their dying of sickness. These things, however, are discovered but by few, for men, for the most part, are sensual and intemperate, and love to satisfy their appetites, and to commit every excess; and, by way of apology, say that they prefer a short and self-indulgent life, to a long and selfdenying one, not knowing that those men are most truly happy who keep their appetites in subjection. Thus have I found it, and I prefer to live temperately, so that I may live long and be useful. He who thus lives cannot be sick, or but seldom, and for a short time, because, by regular living, he destroys ever-y seed of sickness, and thus, by removing the cause, prevents the effect; so that he who pursues a regular and st rictly moderate life, need not fear illness, for his blood having become pure, and free from all bad humors, it is not possible that he can fall sick. A regular life is so profitable and virtuous, it ought to be universally followed. If men have a mind to live long and in health, and die without sickness of body or mind, but by mere dissolution, they must submit to a regular and abstemious life, for such a life keeps the blood clean and pure.

THE PRAISE OF LONG LIFE

Some sensual unthinking persons affirm, that a long life is no great blessing, and that the state of a man, who has passed his seventy-fifth year, cannot really be called life; but this is wrong, as I shall fully prove; and it is my sincere wish, that all men would endeavor to attain my age, that they might enjoy that period of life which of all others is most desirable.

I will therefore give an account of my recreations, and the relish which I find at this stage of life. There are many who can give testimony as to the happiness of my life. in the first place, they see with astonishment the good state of my health and spirits; how I mount my horse without assistance, how I not only ascend a flight of stairs, but can climb a hill with greatest ease. Then, how gay and good-humored I am; my mind ever undisturbed, in fact, joy and peace having fixed their abode in my breast. Moreover, they know in what manner I spend my time, so as never to find life weary: I pass my hours in great delight and pleasure, in converse with men of good sense and intellectual culture; then, when I cannot enjoy their company, I betake myself to the reading of some good book. When I have read as much as I like, I write, endeavoring in this, as in other things, to be of service to others; and these things I do with the greatest ease to myself. Nor are my recreations rendered l ess agreeable by the failing of any of my senses, for they are all, thank God, perfect, particularly my palate, which now relishes better the simple fare I have, than it formerly did the most delicate dishes, when I led an irregular life. I can sleep everywhere soundly and quietly, and my dreams are pleasant and delightful. Strict sobriety, in eating and drinking, renders the senses and understanding clear, the memory tenacious, the body lively and strong, the movements regular and easy; and the soul, feeling so little of her earthly burden, experiences much of her natural liberty. The man thus enjoys a pleasing and agreeable harmony, there being nothing in his system to disturb; for his blood is pure, and runs freely through his veins, and the heat of his body is mild and temperate.

THE PHILOSOPHY OF MODERATION

Sobriety is reduced to two things: quality and quantity. The first consists in avoiding food or drinks, which are found to disagree with the stomach. The second, to avoid taking more than the stomach can easily digest.

Regarding young men, I am in no way surprised at their refusal to live such a life, for their passions are strong and usually their guide. Neither have they much experience; but, when a man has arrived at the age of forty or fifty, surely he should in all things be governed by reason. And this would teach men that gratifying the appetite and palate, is not, as many affirm, natural and right, but is the cause of disease and premature death. Were this pleasure of the palate lasting, it would be some excuse; but it is momentary, compared with the duration of the disease which its excess engenders. But it is a great comfort to a man of sober life to reflect, that what he eats wfll keep him in good health, and be productive of no disease or infirmity.

Now, if this sober and moderate manner of living brings so much happiness; if the blessings that attend it are so stable and permanent, then I beseech every man of sound judgment to embrace this valuable treasure, that of a long and healthful life, a treasure which exceeds all other worldly blessings, and, therefore, should be sought after; for what is wealth and abundance to a man who is possessed with a feeble and sickly body? This is that divine sobriety, agreeable to God, the friend of nature, the daughter of reason, the sister of all the virtues, the companion of temperate living, modest, courteous, content with little, regular, and perfect mistress of all her operations. From her, as from their proper root, spring life, health, cheerfulness, industry, learning and all those actions and employments worthy of noble and generous minds. The laws of God are all in her favor. Repletion, excess, intemperance, superfluous humors, diseases, fevers, pains, and dangers of death, vanish in her presence, as mists before the sun. Her comeliness ravishes every well-disposed mind. Her influence is so sure, as to promise to all a long and agreeable life. And, lastly, she promises to be a mild and pleasant guardian of life, teaching how to ward off the attacks of death. 0 thrice holy sobriety, so useful to man, by reason of the service thou dost render him! Thou prolongest his days, by which means he greatly improves his understanding and, by such knowledge, he can avoid the bitter fruits of sensuality, which is an enemy to man’s reason. Thou, moreover, freest hirn from dreadful thoughts of death. How greatly ought we to be indebted to thee, since by thee, we enjoy this beautiful world, which is really beautiful to all whose sensibilities have not been deadened by repletion, and whose minds have not been blighted by sensuality! I really never knew tfll I grew old, that the world was so beautiful; for, in my younger years I was debauched by irregularities, and therefore cou ld not perceive and enjoy, as I do now, its beauties. 0 truly happy life, which, over and above all these favors conferred on me, hast so improved and perfected my body, that now I have a better relish for plain bread, than formerly I had for the most exquisite dainties! Pure bread is, above all things, man’s best food, and while he leads a sober life, he may be sure of never wanting that natural sauce-a good appetite.

I am not so simple as not to know that, as I was born, so I must die. But the natural death that I speak of does not overtake one until after a long course of years; and even then, I do not expect the pain and agony which most men suffer when they die. But I, by God’s blessing, reckon that I have still a long time to live in health and spirits, and enjoy this beautiful world, which is, indeed, beautiful to those who know how to make it so; but its beauty can only be realized by those who, by reason of temperance and virtue, enjoy sound health of body and mind.

HEAVEN ON EARTH AND ETERNITY: THE ESSENE INFLUENCE

At the age of ninety-one, I am more sound and hearty than ever, much to the amazement of those who know me. 1, who can account for it, am bound to show that a man can enjoy a terrestrial paradise after eighty; but it is not to be obtained, except by strict temperance in food and drink, virtues acceptable to God and friends to reason. During the past few days I have been visited by many learned doctors of this university, as well as physicians and philosophers who were well acquainted with my age, life and manners, also, that I was stout, hearty and lively, my senses perfect, also my voice and teeth, likewise my memory and judgment. They knew, besides, that I constantly employed eight hours every day in writing treatises, with my own hand, on subjects useful to mankind, and spent many more in walking and singing.

These doctors and philosophers told me that it was next to a miracle, that at my age, I should be able to write upon subjects which required both judgment and spirit, and added that I ought not to be looked upon as a person advanced in years, since all my occupations were those of a young man, and that I was altogether unlike aged people of seventy and eighty, who are subject to various ailments and diseases, which render life a weariness; or, if even by chance any escape these things, yet their senses are impaired, sight, or hearing, or memory is defective, and all their faculties much decayed; they are not strong, nor cheerful, as I am. And they moreover said, that they looked upon me as having special grace conferred upon me, and said a great many eloquent and fine things, in endeavoring to prove this, which, however, they could not do; for their arguments were not based on good and sufficient reasons, but merely on their opinions. I therefore endeavored to undeceive and set the m right, and convince them that the happiness I enjoyed was not confined to me, but might be common to all mankind, since I was but a mere mortal, and different in no respect from other men, save in this, that I was born more weakly than some, and had not what is called a strong constitution. Man, however, in his youthful days, is more prone to be led by sensuality than reason; yet, when he arrives at the age of forty, or earlier, he should remember that he has about reached the summit of the hill, and must now think of going down, carrying the weight of years with him; and that old age is the reverse of youth, as much as order is the reverse of disorder; hence, it is requisite that he should alter his mode of life, in regard to the quality and quantity of his food and drink. For it is impossible in the nature of things, that the man who is bent on indulging his appetite, should be healthy and free from ailments. Hence it was to avoid this vice and its evil effects, that I embraced a regular and sober life. I endeavored gradually to relinquish a disorderly life, and to suit myself to strict temperate rules, and thus it came to pass, that a sober and moderate life no longer became disagreeable, though, on account of the weakness of my constitution, I tied myself down to very strict rules in regard to the quantity and quality of what I ate and drank. I had found it no easy task, but it did not become a man to shrink from a glorious and practical task, on account of its difficulties; the greater the obstacles to overcome, the greater the honor and benefit. Our beneficent Creator is desirous, that, as He originally favored human nature with longevity, we should all enjoy the full advantage of His intentions, knowing that when a man has passed the age of seventy, he may be exempt from the sensual strivings, and govern himself entirely by the dictates of reason. Vice and immorality then leave him, and God is willing that he should live to the full maturity of his years, and has ordained that all who reach their natural term should end their days without sickness, but by mere dissolution, the natural way; the wheels of life quietly stopping, and man peacefully leaving this world, to enter upon immortality, as will be my case; for I am sure to die thus, perhaps while chanting my prayers. Nor do the thoughts of death give me the least concern; nor does any other thought connected with death.

Thus, how beautiful my life! How happy my end! But none can be sure of these blessings except such as adhere to the rules of temperance. This security of life is buflt on good and truly natural reasons, which can never fail; it being impossible that he who leads a perfectly sober and temperate life, should breed any sickness, or die before his time. Sooner, he cannot through ill-health die, as his sober life has the virtue to remove the cause of sickness, and sickness cannot happen without a cause; which cause being removed, sickness is also removed, and untimely and painful death is prevented.

And there is no doubt, that temperance in food and drink, taking only as much as nature really requires, and thus being guided by reason, instead of appetite, has efficacy to remove all cause of disease; for since health and sickness, life and death, depend on the good or bad condition of a man’s blood, and the quality of his humors, such a life as I speak of purifies the blood, and corrects all vicious humors, rendering all perfect and harmonious. It is true, and cannot be denied, that man must at last die, however careful with himself he may have been, but yet, I maintain, without sickness and great pain; for in my case I expect to pass away quietly and peacefully, and my present condition insures this to me, for, though I have attained this great age, I am hearty and content, eating with a good appetite, and sleeping soundly. Moreover, all my senses are as good as ever, and in the highest perfection; my understanding clear and bright, my judgment sound, my memory tenacious, my s pirits good, and my voice (one of the first things which is apt to fafl us) has grown so strong and sonorous, that I cannot help chanting aloud my prayers, morning and night, instead of whispering and muttering them to myself as was formerly my custom. [Reference to the morning and evening Essene Communions which he learned of from the translations of St. Jerome.]

oh, how glorious is this life of mine, replete with all the felicities which man can enjoy on this side of the grave! It is entirely exempt from that sensual brutality, which age has enabled my reason to banish; thus I am not troubled with passions, and my mind is calm, and free from all perturbations and doubtful apprehensions. Nor can the thought of death find room in my mind, at least, not in any way to disturb me. And all this has been brought about, by God’s mercy, through my careful habit of living. How different from the life of most old men, full of aches and pains and forebodings, whilst mine is a life of real pleasure, and I seem to spend my days in a perpetual round of happiness, as I shall presently show.

And first, I am of service to my country, and what a joy is this. Another great comfort to me is to think that my treatise on temperance is really useful, as many assure me by word of mouth, and others by letter, where they say, that, under God they are indebted to me for their life. I have also much joy in being able to write, and am thus of service to myself and others; and the satisfaction I have in conversing with men of ability and superior understanding is very great, from whom I always learn something fresh. Now, what a comfort is this, that old as I am, I am able, without fatigue of mind or body thus to be fully engaged, and to study the most important, difficult, and sublime subjects. [Here is a visible influence of St. Jerome’s texts in the monastery of Mone Cassino, concerning the Sevenfold Peace of the ancient Essenes.] I must further add, that at this age, I appear to enjoy two lives: one terrestrial, which in fact I possess, the other celestial, which I possess in tho ught; [here is a strong influence of St. jerome’s translation of the Essene Gospel of Peace, referring to the Kingdoms of the Earthly Mother and Heavenly Father] and this thought is actual enjoyment, when founded upon things we are sure to attain, and 1, through the infinite goodness of the Heavenly Father, am sure of eternal life. Thus, I enjoy the terrestrial life in consequence of my sobriety and temperance [here again the influence of the writings of Jerome on the Essenes of the desert], and I enjoy the celestial, which He makes me anticipate in thought; a thought so lively, as to fix me entirely on this subject, the fruition of which I hold to be of the utmost certainty. And I further maintain, that, dying in the manner I expect, is not really death, but a passage of the soul from this earthly life to a celestial, immortal, and infinitely perfect existence. Whence it is that I enjoy two lives; and the thought of terminating this earthly life gives me no concern, for I know that I have a glorious and immortal life before me.

“Health is so necessary to all the duties, as well as to all the pleasures of life,
that the crime of squandering it is greater than the folly.”

-Dr. Johnson Luigi Cornaro was a Venetian nobleman who was born in 1464. He died in 1566, having attained the venerable age of 102. This achievement was all the more remarkable considering that at the age of forty he was told by his doctors that he had not long to live. But he outlived his physicians and maintained himself in a state of excellent health and vigor for more than sixty additional years.

Up to his fortieth year, Cornaro lived a careless and dissipated life, like the majority of the young men of his day. The fact that he completely broke down as a result, and was given up by his physicians to die, is not surprising. What is surprising, and indeed, what makes the name of Cornaro synonymous with the virtues of moderation, sobriety and perseverance, is that he cured himself, and having done so, continued to practice his theories of sobriety and moderation for the rest of his life, never deviating from the path he had chosen for himself.

“A word to the wise is sufficient,” and once he had heard the wise word of his physician, Cornaro reformed his life. He simplified his diet and cut down on the quantity of food to the very minimum. He limited himself to twelve ounces of solid food daily, and fourteen ounces of liquid. Soon he began to see the difference, and at the end of a year found himself completely restored to health. He continued this simple and austere way of living for the rest of his life, which was a very long one, indeed.

To quote Cornaro: “. . . and there is no doubt that if the one so advised were to act accordingly, he would avoid all sickness in the future; because a well-regulated life removes the causes of disease. Thus, for the remainder of his days, he would have no further need either of doctors or of medicines.”

“Should a man, when ill, continue to eat the same amount as when in health, he would surely die; while, were he to eat more, he would die all the sooner. For his natural powers, already oppressed with sickness, would thereby be burdened beyond endurance, having had forced upon them a quantity of food greater than they could support under the circumstances. A reduced quantity is, in my opinion, all that is required to sustain the individual. Therefore, I accustomed myself to the habit of never fully satisfying my appetite, either with eating or drinking, and always leaving the table when able to take more. In this I acted according to the proverb: Not to satiate one’s self with food is the science of health.”

According to Cornaro, mere prolongation of life is in itself useless unless that life is healthy and happy. A long life fuU of disease and misery is worse than no life at all. The object of health should be, rather, to enable us to forget the body, and to carry on our interests and lifeactivities without impediment or interference, because of sickness or debility, thus permitting the free and full use of our faculties and talents. Through his sober diet, Cornaro regained and maintained his health, which shows us how important is the restriction of quantity of foods, as the most important single factor in the preservation of health and longevity.

Now, there are some men who embrace a spiritual and contemplative life, and this is holy and commendable, their chief employment being to celebrate the praises of God, and to teach men how to serve Him. Now, if while these men set themselves apart for this life, they would also betake themselves to sober and temperate living, how much more agreeable would they render themselves in the sight of God and men. What a much greater honor and ornament would they be to the world! They would likewise enjoy constant health and happiness, would attain a great age, and thus become eminently wise and useful; whereas, now, they are mostly infirm, irritable, and dissatisfied, and think that their various trials and ailments are sent them by Almighty God, with a view of promoting their salvation; that they may do penance in this life for their past errors. In my opinion, they are greatly mistaken; for I cannot believe that God desires that man, his favorite creature, should be infirm and melancholy, but rather, that he should enjoy good health and be happy. Man, however, brings sickness and disease upon himself, by reason, either of his ignorance or wilful self-indulgence. Now, if those who profess to be our teachers in divine matters would also set the example, and thus teach men how to preserve their bodies in health, they would do much to make the road to heaven easier; men need to be taught that a well-ordered life and strict temperance is the path to health of the body and health of the mind, and that only when the body and mind are healthy, can God’s purpose in our lives be fulfilled. [In this last beautiful paragraph, Cornaro professes his knowledge of the Essene Way, learned from the writings of St. Jerome, a way of life completely contrary to the life-style of 15th century Italy, yet embraced by Cornaro with unprecedented courage, perseverance, and joy.

CORNARO’S IDEAS

ON A TEMPERATE AND HEALTHFUL LIFE

It is universally agreed, that custom, in time, becomes a second nature, forcing men to use that, whether good or bad, to which they have been habituated; in fact, we see habit, in many instances, gain the ascendancy over reason. This is so undeniably true, that virtuous men, by keeping company with wicked, often fall into the same vicious course of life. Seeing and considering all this, I have decided to write on the vice of intemperance in eating and drinking.

Now, though all are agreed that intemperance is the parent of gluttony, and sober living the offspring of abstemiousness; yet, owing to the power of custom, the former is considered a virtue, and the latter as mean and avaricious; and so many men are blinded and besotted to such a degree, that they come to the age of forty or fifty, burdened with strange and painful infirmities, which render them decrepit and useless; whereas, had they lived temperately and soberly, they would in all probability have been sound and hearty, to the age of eighty and upward. To remedy this state of things, it is requisite that men should live up to the simplicity dictated by nature, which teaches us to be content with little, and accustom ourselves to cat no more than is absolutely necessary to support life, remembering that all excess causes disease and leads to death. Many young men of the best understanding have recognized the necessity of following this way of life, because many of their pa rents have died in middle life, while I remain so sound and hearty at the age of one hundred and one.

The heavy train of infirmities which had made great inroads on my constitution, were my motives for renouncing intemperance, in the matter of too freely eating and drinking, to which I had been addicted, so that, in consequence of it, my stomach became disordered, and I suffered much pain from colic and gout, attended by that which was still worse, an almost continual slow fever, a stomach generally out of order, and a perpetual thirst. From these disorders, the best delivery I had to hope was death. Finding myself, therefore, between my thirty-fifth and fortieth year in such unhappy circumstances, and having tried everything that could be thought of to relieve me, but to no purpose, my physician gave me to understand that there was one method left to get the better of my complaints, provided I would resolve to use it, and patiently persevere. This was to live a strictly sober and regular life, which would be of the greatest efficacy. He further added that, if I did not at once ado pt this method of strict living, I should in a few months receive no benefit from it, and that in a few more I must resign myself to death.

These arguments made such an impression on me, that, mortified as I was, besides, by the thought of dying in the prime of life, though at the same time perpetually tormented by various diseases, I immediately resolved, in order to avoid at once both disease and death, to betake myself to a regular course of life. Having upon this inquired of him what rules I should follow, he told me that I must only use food, solid or liquid, such as is generally prescribed to sick persons; and both sparingly. These directions, to say the truth, I had been given before, but I had been impatient of such restraint, and had eaten and drunk freely of those things I had desired. But, when I had once resolved to live soberly, and according to the dictates of reason, feeling it was my duty as a man so to do, I entered with so much resolution upon this new course of life, that nothing since has been able to divert me from it. The consequence was, that in a few days I began to perceive that such a course a greed well with me; and, by pursuing it, I found myself in less than a year (some people, perhaps, will not believe it), entirely freed from all my complaints.

EATING LITTLE MAKES LIFE LONG

Having thus recovered my health, I began to seriously consider the power of temperance: if it had efficacy enough to subdue such grievous disorders as mine, it must also have power to preserve me in health and strengthen my bad constitution. I gave over the use of such meats and wines as did not suit me, and chose those which by experience I found agreed well with me, taking only as much as I could easily digest, having strict regard to quantity as well as quality; and contrived matters so as never to cloy my stomach with eating or drinking, and always rose from the table with a disposition to eat and drink more. In consequence, therefore, of my taking such methods, I have always enjoyed, and, God be praised, still enjoy, the best of health. It is true that, besides the two most important rules relative to eating and drinking, which I have ever been very scrupulous to observe (that is, not to take of either, more than my stomach could easily digest, and to use only those things which agree with me), I have carefully avoided, as far as possible, all extreme heat, Cold, extraordinary fatigue, interruption of my usual hours of rest, or staying long in bad air. I likewise did all that lay in my power, to avoid those evils, which we do not find it so easy to remove: melancholy, hatred, and other violent passions, which appear to have the most -profound influence on our bodies. I am a living witness, and so are many others who know me, and have seen me, how often I have been exposed to heats and colds, and disagreeable changes of weather, without taking harm. He who leads a sober and regular life, and commits no excess in his diet, can suffer but little from mental disorders or external accidents.

I conclude, especially from the late trial I have had, that excesses in eating and drinking are often fatal. Four years ago, I consented to increase the quantity of my food by two ounces, my friends and relations having, for some time past, urged upon me the necessity of such increase, that the quantity I took was too little for one so advanced in years; against this, I urged that nature was content with little, and that with this small quantity I had preserved myself for many years in health and activity, that I believed as a man

advanced in years, his stomach grew weaker, and therefore the tendency should be to lessen the amount of food rather than to increase. I further reminded them of the two proverbs, which say: He who has a mind to eat a great deal, must eat but little; eating little makes life long, and, living long, he must eat much; and the other proverb was: That which we leave after making a hearty meal does us more good than what we have eaten. But my arguments and proverbs were not able to prevent them teasing me upon the subject; therefore, not to appear obstinate, or affecting to know more than the physicians themselves, but above all, to please my family, I consented to the increase before mentioned; so that, whereas previous, what with bread, the yolk of an egg, and soup@ I ate as much as twelve ounces, neither more nor less, I now increased it to fourteen; and whereas before I drank but fourteen ounces of liquid, I now increased it to sixteen. This increase had, in eight day’ s time, such an effect upon me that, from being cheerful and brisk, I began to be peevish and melancholy, so that nothing could please me. On the twelfth day, I was attacked with a violent pain in my side, which lasted twenty-two hours and was followed by a fever, which continued thirty-five days without any respite, insomuch that all looked upon me as a dead man; but, God be praised, I recovered, and I am positive that it was the great regularity I had observed for so many years, and that only, which rescued me from the jaws of death.

GUIDE TO HEALTH THROUGH SOBRIETY

Orderly living is doubtless a most certain cause and foundation of health and long life; nay, I say it is the only true medicine, and whoever weighs the matter weU, will come to this conclusion. Hence it is, that when the physician comes to visit a patient, the first thing he prescribes is regular living, and certainly to avoid excess. Now, if the patient after recovery should continue so to live, he could not be sick again, and if a very small quantity of food is sufficient to restore his health, then but a slight addition is necessary for the continuance of the same; and so, for the future, he would want neither physician nor physic; he would become his own physician, and indeed, the best he could have, since, in fact, no man should be a perfect physician to any but himself. The reason is, that any man, by repeated trials, may acquire a perfect knowledge of his own constitution, the kinds of food and drink which agree with him best. A man cannot have a better guide than himself, nor any physic better than a regular life. We should consider this regular life as our physician, since it preserves men, even those of a weak constitution, in health; makes them live sound and hearty, to the age of one hundred and upward, and prevents their dying of sickness. These things, however, are discovered but by few, for men, for the most part, are sensual and intemperate, and love to satisfy their appetites, and to commit every excess; and, by way of apology, say that they prefer a short and self-indulgent life, to a long and selfdenying one, not knowing that those men are most truly happy who keep their appetites in subjection. Thus have I found it, and I prefer to live temperately, so that I may live long and be useful. He who thus lives cannot be sick, or but seldom, and for a short time, because, by regular living, he destroys ever-y seed of sickness, and thus, by removing the cause, prevents the effect; so that he who pursues a regular and strictly moderate life, need not fear illness, for his blood having become pure, and free from all bad humors, it is not possible that he can fall sick. A regular life is so profitable and virtuous, it ought to be universally followed. If men have a mind to live long and in health, and die without sickness of body or mind, but by mere dissolution, they must submit to a regular and abstemious life, for such a life keeps the blood clean and pure.

THE PRAISE OF LONG LIFE

Some sensual unthinking persons affirm, that a long life is no great blessing, and that the state of a man, who has passed his seventy-fifth year, cannot really be called life; but this is wrong, as I shall fully prove; and it is my sincere wish, that all men would endeavor to attain my age, that they might enjoy that period of life which of all others is most desirable.

I will therefore give an account of my recreations, and the relish which I find at this stage of life. There are many who can give testimony as to the happiness of my life. in the first place, they see with astonishment the good state of my health and spirits; how I mount my horse without assistance, how I not only ascend a flight of stairs, but can climb a hill with greatest ease. Then, how gay and good-humored I am; my mind ever undisturbed, in fact, joy and peace having fixed their abode in my breast. Moreover, they know in what manner I spend my time, so as never to find life weary: I pass my hours in great delight and pleasure, in converse with men of good sense and intellectual culture; then, when I cannot enjoy their company, I betake myself to the reading of some good book. When I have read as much as I like, I write, endeavoring in this, as in other things, to be of service to others; and these things I do with the greatest ease to myself. Nor are my recreations rendered l ess agreeable by the failing of any of my senses, for they are all, thank God, perfect, particularly my palate, which now relishes better the simple fare I have, than it formerly did the most delicate dishes, when I led an irregular life. I can sleep everywhere soundly and quietly, and my dreams are pleasant and delightful. Strict sobriety, in eating and drinking, renders the senses and understanding clear, the memory tenacious, the body lively and strong, the movements regular and easy; and the soul, feeling so little of her earthly burden, experiences much of her natural liberty. The man thus enjoys a pleasing and agreeable harmony, there being nothing in his system to disturb; for his blood is pure, and runs freely through his veins, and the heat of his body is mild and temperate.

THE PHILOSOPHY OF MODERATION

Sobriety is reduced to two things: quality and quantity. The first consists in avoiding food or drinks, which are found to disagree with the stomach. The second, to avoid taking more than the stomach can easily digest.

Regarding young men, I am in no way surprised at their refusal to live such a life, for their passions are strong and usually their guide. Neither have they much experience; but, when a man has arrived at the age of forty or fifty, surely he should in all things be governed by reason. And this would teach men that gratifying the appetite and palate, is not, as many affirm, natural and right, but is the cause of disease and premature death. Were this pleasure of the palate lasting, it would be some excuse; but it is momentary, compared with the duration of the disease which its excess engenders. But it is a great comfort to a man of sober life to reflect, that what he eats wfll keep him in good health, and be productive of no disease or infirmity.

Now, if this sober and moderate manner of living brings so much happiness; if the blessings that attend it are so stable and permanent, then I beseech every man of sound judgment to embrace this valuable treasure, that of a long and healthful life, a treasure which exceeds all other worldly blessings, and, therefore, should be sought after; for what is wealth and abundance to a man who is possessed with a feeble and sickly body? This is that divine sobriety, agreeable to God, the friend of nature, the daughter of reason, the sister of all the virtues, the companion of temperate living, modest, courteous, content with little, regular, and perfect mistress of all her operations. From her, as from their proper root, spring life, health, cheerfulness, industry, learning and all those actions and employments worthy of noble and generous minds. The laws of God are all in her favor. Repletion, excess, intemperance, superfluous humors, diseases, fevers, pains, and dangers of death, vanish in her presence, as mists before the sun. Her comeliness ravishes every well-disposed mind. Her influence is so sure, as to promise to all a long and agreeable life. And, lastly, she promises to be a mild and pleasant guardian of life, teaching how to ward off the attacks of death. 0 thrice holy sobriety, so useful to man, by reason of the service thou dost render him! Thou prolongest his days, by which means he greatly improves his understanding and, by such knowledge, he can avoid the bitter fruits of sensuality, which is an enemy to man’s reason. Thou, moreover, freest hirn from dreadful thoughts of death. How greatly ought we to be indebted to thee, since by thee, we enjoy this beautiful world, which is really beautiful to all whose sensibilities have not been deadened by repletion, and whose minds have not been blighted by sensuality! I really never knew tfll I grew old, that the world was so beautiful; for, in my younger years I was debauched by irregularities, and therefore cou ld not perceive and enjoy, as I do now, its beauties. 0 truly happy life, which, over and above all these favors conferred on me, hast so improved and perfected my body, that now I have a better relish for plain bread, than formerly I had for the most exquisite dainties! Pure bread is, above all things, man’s best food, and while he leads a sober life, he may be sure of never wanting that natural sauce-a good appetite.

I am not so simple as not to know that, as I was born, so I must die. But the natural death that I speak of does not overtake one until after a long course of years; and even then, I do not expect the pain and agony which most men suffer when they die. But I, by God’s blessing, reckon that I have still a long time to live in health and spirits, and enjoy this beautiful world, which is, indeed, beautiful to those who know how to make it so; but its beauty can only be realized by those who, by reason of temperance and virtue, enjoy sound health of body and mind.

HEAVEN ON EARTH AND ETERNITY: THE ESSENE INFLUENCE

At the age of ninety-one, I am more sound and hearty than ever, much to the amazement of those who know me. 1, who can account for it, am bound to show that a man can enjoy a terrestrial paradise after eighty; but it is not to be obtained, except by strict temperance in food and drink, virtues acceptable to God and friends to reason. During the past few days I have been visited by many learned doctors of this university, as well as physicians and philosophers who were well acquainted with my age, life and manners, also, that I was stout, hearty and lively, my senses perfect, also my voice and teeth, likewise my memory and judgment. They knew, besides, that I constantly employed eight hours every day in writing treatises, with my own hand, on subjects useful to mankind, and spent many more in walking and singing.

These doctors and philosophers told me that it was next to a miracle, that at my age, I should be able to write upon subjects which required both judgment and spirit, and added that I ought not to be looked upon as a person advanced in years, since all my occupations were those of a young man, and that I was altogether unlike aged people of seventy and eighty, who are subject to various ailments and diseases, which render life a weariness; or, if even by chance any escape these things, yet their senses are impaired, sight, or hearing, or memory is defective, and all their faculties much decayed; they are not strong, nor cheerful, as I am. And they moreover said, that they looked upon me as having special grace conferred upon me, and said a great many eloquent and fine things, in endeavoring to prove this, which, however, they could not do; for their arguments were not based on good and sufficient reasons, but merely on their opinions. I therefore endeavored to undeceive and set the m right, and convince them that the happiness I enjoyed was not confined to me, but might be common to all mankind, since I was but a mere mortal, and different in no respect from other men, save in this, that I was born more weakly than some, and had not what is called a strong constitution. Man, however, in his youthful days, is more prone to be led by sensuality than reason; yet, when he arrives at the age of forty, or earlier, he should remember that he has about reached the summit of the hill, and must now think of going down, carrying the weight of years with him; and that old age is the reverse of youth, as much as order is the reverse of disorder; hence, it is requisite that he should alter his mode of life, in regard to the quality and quantity of his food and drink. For it is impossible in the nature of things, that the man who is bent on indulging his appetite, should be healthy and free from ailments. Hence it was to avoid this vice and its evil effects, that I embraced a regular and sober life. I endeavored gradually to relinquish a disorderly life, and to suit myself to strict temperate rules, and thus it came to pass, that a sober and moderate life no longer became disagreeable, though, on account of the weakness of my constitution, I tied myself down to very strict rules in regard to the quantity and quality of what I ate and drank. I had found it no easy task, but it did not become a man to shrink from a glorious and practical task, on account of its difficulties; the greater the obstacles to overcome, the greater the honor and benefit. Our beneficent Creator is desirous, that, as He originally favored human nature with longevity, we should all enjoy the full advantage of His intentions, knowing that when a man has passed the age of seventy, he may be exempt from the sensual strivings, and govern himself entirely by the dictates of reason. Vice and immorality then leave him, and God is willing that he should live to the full maturity of his years, and has ordained that all who reach their natural term should end their days without sickness, but by mere dissolution, the natural way; the wheels of life quietly stopping, and man peacefully leaving this world, to enter upon immortality, as will be my case; for I am sure to die thus, perhaps while chanting my prayers. Nor do the thoughts of death give me the least concern; nor does any other thought connected with death.

Thus, how beautiful my life! How happy my end! But none can be sure of these blessings except such as adhere to the rules of temperance. This security of life is buflt on good and truly natural reasons, which can never fail; it being impossible that he who leads a perfectly sober and temperate life, should breed any sickness, or die before his time. Sooner, he cannot through ill-health die, as his sober life has the virtue to remove the cause of sickness, and sickness cannot happen without a cause; which cause being removed, sickness is also removed, and untimely and painful death is prevented.

And there is no doubt, that temperance in food and drink, taking only as much as nature really requires, and thus being guided by reason, instead of appetite, has efficacy to remove all cause of disease; for since health and sickness, life and death, depend on the good or bad condition of a man’s blood, and the quality of his humors, such a life as I speak of purifies the blood, and corrects all vicious humors, rendering all perfect and harmonious. It is true, and cannot be denied, that man must at last die, however careful with himself he may have been, but yet, I maintain, without sickness and great pain; for in my case I expect to pass away quietly and peacefully, and my present condition insures this to me, for, though I have attained this great age, I am hearty and content, eating with a good appetite, and sleeping soundly. Moreover, all my senses are as good as ever, and in the highest perfection; my understanding clear and bright, my judgment sound, my memory tenacious, my s pirits good, and my voice (one of the first things which is apt to fafl us) has grown so strong and sonorous, that I cannot help chanting aloud my prayers, morning and night, instead of whispering and muttering them to myself as was formerly my custom. [Reference to the morning and evening Essene Communions which he learned of from the translations of St. Jerome.]

oh, how glorious is this life of mine, replete with all the felicities which man can enjoy on this side of the grave! It is entirely exempt from that sensual brutality, which age has enabled my reason to banish; thus I am not troubled with passions, and my mind is calm, and free from all perturbations and doubtful apprehensions. Nor can the thought of death find room in my mind, at least, not in any way to disturb me. And all this has been brought about, by God’s mercy, through

my careful habit of living. How different from the life of most old men, full of aches and pains and forebodings, whilst mine is a life of real pleasure, and I seem to spend my days in a perpetual round of happiness, as I shall presently show.

And first, I am of service to my country, and what a joy is this. Another great comfort to me is to think that my treatise on temperance is really useful, as many assure me by word of mouth, and others by letter, where they say, that, under God they are indebted to me for their life. I have also much joy in being able to write, and am thus of service to myself and others; and the satisfaction I have in conversing with men of ability and superior understanding is very great, from whom I always learn something fresh. Now, what a comfort is this, that old as I am, I am able, without fatigue of mind or body thus to be fully engaged, and to study the most important, difficult, and sublime subjects. [Here is a visible influence of St. Jerome’s texts in the monastery of Mone Cassino, concerning the Sevenfold Peace of the ancient Essenes.] I must further add, that at this age, I appear to enjoy two lives: one terrestrial, which in fact I possess, the other celestial, which I possess in tho ught; [here is a strong influence of St. jerome’s translation of the Essene Gospel of Peace, referring to the Kingdoms of the Earthly Mother and Heavenly Father] and this thought is actual enjoyment, when founded upon things we are sure to attain, and 1, through the infinite goodness of the Heavenly Father, am sure of eternal life. Thus, I enjoy the terrestrial life in consequence of my sobriety and temperance [here again the influence of the writings of Jerome on the Essenes of the desert], and I enjoy the celestial, which He makes me anticipate in thought; a thought so lively, as to fix me entirely on this subject, the fruition of which I hold to be of the utmost certainty. And I further maintain, that, dying in the manner I expect, is not really death, but a passage of the soul from this earthly life to a celestial, immortal, and infinitely perfect existence. Whence it is that I enjoy two lives; and the thought of terminating this earthly life gives me no concern, for I know that I have a glorious and immortal life before me.

Now, there are some men who embrace a spiritual and contemplative life, and this is holy and commendable, their chief employment being to celebrate the praises of God, and to teach men how to serve Him. Now, if while these men set themselves apart for this life, they would also betake themselves to sober and temperate living, how much more agreeable would they render themselves in the sight of God and men. What a much greater honor and ornament would they be to the world! They would likewise enjoy constant health and happiness, would attain a great age, and thus become eminently wise and useful; whereas, now, they are mostly infirm, irritable, and dissatisfied, and think that their various trials and ailments are sent them by Almighty God, with a view of promoting their salvation; that they may do penance in this life for their past errors. In my opinion, they are greatly mistaken; for I cannot believe that God desires that man, his favorite creature, should be infirm and melanchol y, but rather, that he should enjoy good health and be happy. Man, however, brings sickness and disease upon himself, by reason, either of his ignorance or wilful self-indulgence. Now, if those who profess to be our teachers in divine matters would also set the example, and thus teach men how to preserve their bodies in health, they would do much to make the road to heaven easier; men need to be taught that a well-ordered life and strict temperance is the path to health of the body and health of the mind, and that only when the body and mind are healthy, can God’s purpose in our lives be fulfilled. [In this last beautiful paragraph, Cornaro professes his knowledge of the Essene Way, learned from the writings of St. Jerome, a way of life completely contrary to the life-style of 15th century Italy, yet embraced by Cornaro with unprecedented courage, perseverance, and joy.

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The Gnostic Gospels and Writings

The Gospel Of Phillip

The Gospel of Phillip.
translation by Wesley W.Isenberg

A Hebrew makes another Hebrew, and such a person is called proselyte. But a proselyte does not make another proselyte. Some both exist just as they are and make others like themselves, while others simply exist. The slave seeks only to be free, but he does not hope to acquire the estate of his master. But the son is not only a son but lays claim to the inheritance of the father. Those who are heirs to the dead are themselves dead, and they inherit the dead. Those who are heirs to what is living are alive, and they are heirs to both what is living and the dead. The dead are heirs to nothing. For how can he who is dead inherit? If he who is dead inherits what is living he will not die, but he who is dead will live even more.

A Gentile does not die, for he has never lived in order that he may die. He who has believed in the truth has found life, and this one is in danger of dying, for he is alive. Ever since Chirst came the world is created, the cities adorned, the dead carried out. When we were Hebrews we were orphans and had only our mother, but when we became Christians we had both father and mother.

Those who sow in winter reap in summer. The winter is the world, the summer the other Aeon. Let us sow in the world that we may reap in the summer. Because it is not fitting for us not to pray in the winter. Summer follows winter. But if any man reap in the winter hw will not actually reap but pluck out, since this sort of thing will not provide him a harvest. It is not only noe that the fruit will not come forth, but also on the Sabbath his field will be barren.

Christ came to ransom some, to save others, to redeem others. He ransomed those who were strangers and made them his own. And he set his own apart, those whom he gave as a pledge in his will. It was not only when he appeared that he voluntarily laid down his life, but he voluntarily laid down his life from the very day the world came into being. Then he came forth in order to take it, since it has been given as a pledge. It fell into the hands of robbers and was taken captive , but he saved it. He redeemed the good people in the world as well as the evil.

Light and Darkness, life and death, right and left, are brothers of one another. They are inseparable.Because of this neither are the good good, nor evil evil, nor is life life, nor death death. For this reason each one will dissolve into its original nature. But those who are exalted above the world are indissoluble, eternal.

Names given to worldly things are very deceptive for they divert our thoughts from what is correct to what is incorrect. Thus one who hears the word God does not perceive what is correct, but perceives what is incorrect.So also with the Father and the Son and Holy Spirit and life and light and ressurrection and the Church(Ekklesia) and all the rest – people do not perceive what is correct. The names which are heard in the world to deceive. If they were in the Aeon, they would at no time be used as names in the world.Nor were they set among worldly things. They have an end in the Aeon.

One single name is not uttered in the world, the name which the Father gave to the Son, the name above all things; the name of the Father. For the Son would not become Father unless he wears the name of the Father. Thos who have this name know it, buut they do not speak it. But those who do not have it do not know it.

But truth brought names into existennce in the world because it is not possible to teach without names. Truth is one single thing and it is also many things for our sakes who learn this one thing in love through many things. The powers wanted to deceive man, since they saw that he had kinship with those that are truly good. They took the name of those that are good and gave it to those who are not good, so that through the names they might deceive him and bind them to those that are not good. And afterward, if they do them a favor, they will be made to remove them from those that are not good and place them among those that are good. These things they knew, for they wanted to take the free man and make him a slave to them forever.

These are the powers which contend against man, not wishing him to be saved. For if man is saved, there will not be any sacrifices and animals will not be offered to the powers. They were indeed offering them up alive, but then they offered them up they died. As for (the Son of?) man, they offered him up to God dead, and he lived.

Before Christ came there was no bread in the world, just as Paradise, the place were Adam was, had many trees to nourish the animals but no wheat to sustain man. Man used to feed like the animals, but when Christ came, the perfect man, he brought bread from heaven in order that man might be nourished with the food of man. The powers thought that it was by their own power and will they were doing what they did ,but the Holy Spirit in secret accomplished everything through them as it wished. Truth, which existed since the beginning, is sown everywhere. And many see it as it is sown, but few are they who see it as it is reaped.

Some said,Mary conceived by the Holy Spirit, they are in error. They do not know what they are saying.When did a woman ever conceive by a woman? Mary is the virgin whom no power defiled. She is a great anathema to the Hebrews, who are the apostles and apostolic men. This virgin whom no power defiled; the powers defiled themselves. And the Lord would not have said My Father who is in Heaven[Matt16:17] unless he had had another father, but he would have said simply My father.

The Lord said to the disciples Bring out from every other hourse Bring into the house of the Father. But do not take anything in the house of the Father nor carry it off.

Jesus is a hidden name; Christ is a revealed name for this reason:Jesus does not exist in any other language, but his name is always Jesus as he is called. Christ is also his name; in Syriac it is Messiah, in Greek it is Christ. Certainly all the others have it according to their own language.The Nazarene is he who reveals what is hidden. Christ has everything in himself – man, angel, mystery, and the Father.

Those who say that the Lord died first and then rose up are in error, for he rose up first and then died. If one does not first attain the ressurrection will he not die? As God lives, he would already be dead.

No one will hide a large valuable objectin something large, but many a time one has tossed countless thousands into a thing worth a penny. Compare the Soul. It is a precious thing and it came to be in a contemptible body.

Some are afraid lest they rise naked. Because of this they wish to rise in the flesh, and they do not know that it is those who wear the flesh who are naked. It is those who […] to unclothe themselves who are not naked.Flesh and Blood shall not be able to inherit the kingdom of God[1Cor15:50] What is this which will not inherit? This which is on us. But what is this very thing which will inherit? It is that which belongs to Jesus and his blood. Because of this he said He who shall not eat my flesh and drink my blood has not life in him[John6:53] What is it? His flesh is the word, and his blood is the Holy Spirit. He who have received these has food and he has drink and clothing. I find fault with the others who say that it will not rise. Then both of them are at fault. You say that the flesh will not rise. But tell me what will rise, that we may honour you. You say the Spirit in the flesh, and it is also this light in the flesh. But this too is a matter which is in the flesh, for whatever you shall say, you say nothing outside the flesh.It is necessary to rise in this flesh, since everything exists in it.In this world those who put on garments are better than the garments. In the Kingdom of Heaven the garments are better than those that put them on.

It is through water and fire that the whole place is purified – the visible by the visible, the hidden by the hidden. There are some things hidden through those visible. There is water in the water, there is fire in the chrism. Jesus took them all by stealth, for he did not reveal himself in the manner in which he was, but it was in the manner in which they would be able to see him that he revealed himself. He revealed himself to them all. He revealed himself as great to the great. He revealed himself as small to the small. He revealed himself to the angels as an angel. Because of this his word hid itself from everyone. Some indeed saw him, thinking that they were seeing themselves, but when he appeared to his disciples in glory on the mount he was not small. He became great, but he made the disciples great,that they might be able to see his greatness. He said on that day in the Thanksgiving You who have joined the perfect, the light, with the Holy Spirit, unite the angels with us also, the images. Do not despise the lamb, for without it, it is not possible to see the king.No one will be able to go in to the king if he is naked.

The heavenly man has many more sons than the earthly man.If the sons if Adam are many, although they die, how much more the sons of the perfect manm they who do not die but are always begotten. The father makes a son, and the son has not the power to make a son. For he who has been begotten has not the power to beget, but the sons gets brothers for himself, not sons. All who are begotten in the world in a natural way, and the others in a spiritual way. Those who are begotten by him cry out from that place to the perfect man, because they are nourished on the promise concerning the heavenly place. If the word has gone out from that place it would become perfect. For it is by a kiss that the perfect conceive and give birth. For this reason we also kiss one another. We receive conception from the grace which is in each other.

There were three who always walked with the Lord; Mary, his mother, and his sister and Magdalene, the one who was his companion. His sister and his mother and his companion were each a Mary.

The Father and the Son is both single names, the Holy Spirit is a double name. For they are everywhere: they are in the concealed, they are in the revealed. The Holy Spirit is the revealed: it is below. It is in the concealed: it is above.

The saints are served by evil powers, for they are blinded by the Holy Spirit into thinking that they are serving an ordinary man whenever they do something for the saints. Because of this a disciple asked the Lord one day for something of this world. He said to him: Ask your mother, and she will give you of the things which are another`s.

The apostles said to the disciples:May our offering obtain salt They called Sophia salt. Without it no offering is acceptable. But Sophia is without child. For this reason she is called a trace of salt . But where they will be in their own way, the Holy Spirit will also be, and her children are many.

What the father possesses belongs to the son, and the son himself, so long as he is small, is not entrusted with what is his. But when he becomes a man his father give him all that he possesses. Those who have gone astray, whom the spirit itself begets, usaully go astray because of the Spirit. Thus, by this one and the same breath, the fire blazes and is put out.

Echamoth is one thing and Echmoth, another. Echamoth is Wisdom simply, but Echmoth is the Wisdom of death which is the one who knows death [called The little wisdom]. There are domestic animals like the bull and the ass and others of this kind. Others are wild and live apart in the deserts. Man ploughs the field by means of the domestic animals, and from this he feeds both himself and the animals, wether tame or wild. Compare the perfect man. It is through powers which are submissive that he ploughs, prepairing for everything to come into being. For it is because of this that the whole place stands, wether good or evil, the right and the left. The Holy Spirit shepherds everyone and rules all the powers, the tame ones and the wild ones, as well as those which are unique. For indeed she gathers them and shuts them inn, in order that these, even if they wish, will not be able to escape. He who has been created us beautiful, and you would find his sons noble creations. If he was not created, but begotten, you would find that his seed was noble. But now he was created and he begot. What nobility is this? First, adultery came into being, afterward murder. And he was begotten in adultery, for he was the child of the Serpent. So he became a murderer, just like his father, and he killed his brother. Indeed, every act of sexual intercourse which has accured between those who are unlike one another is adultery.

God is a dyer. As the good dyes which are called true, dissolve with the things dyed in them, so it is with those whom God has dyed.Since the dyes is immortal, they are immortal by means of his co,ors. Now God dips what he dips in water. It is not possible for anyone to see anything of the things that actually exist unless he becomes like them. This is not the way with man in the world: he sees the sun without being a sun; and he sees the heaven and the earth and all other things, but he is not these things. You saw the Spirit, and you became spirit. You saw Christ and you became Christ [a christian]. You saw the Father and you shall become Father. So in this place you see everything and do not see yourself; but in that place you do see yourself – and what you see you shall become.

Faith receives, Love gives. No one will be able to receive without faith.No one will be able to give without love. Because of this, in order that we may indeed receive, we believe; but it is so that we may love and give, since if one does not give in love, he has no profit from what he has given. He who has not received the Lord is still a Hebrew.

The apostles who were before us had these names for him: Jesus,the Nazorean, Messiah, that is , Jesus, the Nazorean, Christ The last name is Christ, the first is Jesus, that in the middle is the Nazarne Messiah has two meanings, both the Christ and the measured. Jesus in Hebrew is the redemption Nazara is the Truth. The Nazarene then, is the Truth.Christ has been measured. The Nazarene and Jesus are they who have been measured.

When the pearl is cast down into the mud it does not become greatly despised, nor if it is anointed with balsam oil will it become more precious. But it always has value in the eyes of the owner. Compare the Sons of God, whatever they may be. They still have value in the eyes of their Father.

God is a man-eater. For this reason men are sacrificed to him. Before men were sacrificed animals were being sacrificed, since those to whom they were sacrificed were not gods. Glass decanters and earthenware jugs are both made by means of fire. But if glass decanters break they are done over, for they came into being through a breath. If earthenware jugs break, however, they are destroyed, for they came into being without breath.

An ass which turns a millstone did a hundred miles of walking. When it was loosened, it found that it was still at the same place. There are men who make many journeys, but make no progress towards a destination. When evening came upon them, they saw neither city nor village, neither creation nor nature, power nor angel. In vain have the wretches labored.

The eucharist is Jesus. For he is called in Syriac Pharisatha which is the one who is spread out for Jesus came crufifying the world. The Lord went into the dye works of Levi. He took seventy-two different colors and threw them into the vat. He took them out all white. And he said, Even so the Son of Man come as a dyer

As for the Wisdom who is called the barren she is the mother of the angels.And the companion of the Saviour is Mary Magdalene. But Christ loved her more than all the disciples and used to kiss her often. The rest of the disciples were offended by it and expressed disapproval. They said to him Why do you love her more than all of us? The Saviour answered and said to them,Why do I not love you like her?.When a blind man and one who sees are together in the darkness, they are no different from one another. When the light comes, then he who sees will see the light, and he who is blind will remain in the darkness. The Lord said Blessed is he who is before he came into being. For he who is, has been and shall be The superiority of man is not obvious to the eye but lies in what is hidden from view. Consequently, he has mastery over the animals which are stronger than he is and great in terms of the obvious and the hidden. This enables them to survive. But if man is separated from them, they slay one another and bite one another. They ate one another because they did not find any food. But now they have found food because man tilled the soil.

If one goes down into the water and comes up again without having received anything, and says I am a Chr¡stian he has borrowed the name at interest. But if he receives the Holy Spirit, he has the name as a gift. He who has received a gift does not have to give it back, but of him who has borrowed it at interest, payment is demanded. This is the way it happens to one when one experiences a mystery. Great is the mystery of marriage! For without it the world would not have existed. Now the existence of the world depends on man, and the existence of man on marriage. Think of the undefiled relationship, for it possesses a great power. Its image consists of a defilement of the form.

As for the unclean spirits, there are males among them and there are females. The males are they which unite with the souls which inhabit a female form, but the females are they which are mingled with those in a male form, through one who was disobedient. And none shall be able to escape them, since they detain him if he does not receive a male power or a female power – the bridegroom and the bride.One receives them from the mirrored bridal chamber. When the wanton women see a male sitting alone, they leap down on him and play with him and defile him. So also the lecherous men, when they see a beautiful woman sitting alone, they persuade her and comple her, wishing to defile her. But if they see the man and his wife sitting beside one another, the female cannot come into the man, nor can the male come into a woman. So if the image and the angel are united with one another, neither can any venture to go into the man or the woman.

He who comes out of the world can no longer be detained, because he was in the world. It is evident that he is above desire and fear. He is master over nature. He is superior to envy. If anyone else comes, they seize him and throttle him. And how will this one be able to escape the great grasping powers? How will he be able to hide from them? Often some come and say We are faithful in order that they may be able to escape the unclean spirits and the demons. For if they had the Holy Spirit no unclean spirit would cleave to them. Fear not the flesh nor love it. If you fear it, it will gain mastery over you. If you love it, it will swallow and paralyzr you. Either will he be in this world or in the ressurrection ot in the places of the middle.God forbid that I be found in them! In this world there is good and evil.Its good is not good, and its evil not evil. But there is evil after this world which is truly evil – what is called the Middle,It is death. While we are i n this world it is fitting for us to acquire the ressurrection for ourselves, so that when we strip off the flesh we may be found in rest and not walk in the Middle.For many go astray on the way. For it is good to come forth from the world before one has sinned.

Some neither desire to sin nor are able to sin. Others, even if they desire to sin, are not better off for not having done it, for this desire makes them sinners. But even if some do not desire to sin, rightousness will be concealed for them both – those who desire not and do not. An apostolic man in a vision saw some people shut up in a house afire and bound with fiery chains, lying in flaming ointment. And he said to them Why are they not able to be saved? They answered They did not desire it. They received this place as punishment,what is called the outer darkness, because he is thrown out into it. It is from water and fire that the soul and the spirit came into being. It is from water and fire and light that the son of the bridal chamber came into being. The fire is the chrism, the light is the fire. I am not referring to that fire which has no form, but the other fire whose for are white, which is bright and beautiful, and which gives beauty.

Truth did not come into the world naked, but it came in types and images. One will receive the truth in any other way. There is a rebirth and an image of rebirth.It is certainly necessary that they should be born again through the image. The bridegroom and the image must enter through the image into the truth: this is the restoration. It is appropiate that those who do not have it only acquire the name of the Father and the Son, and the Holy Spirit, but that the have acquired it on their own. If one does not acquire the name for himself, the name Christian will also be taken from him. But one receives them in the aromatic unction of the power of the cross.This power the apostles called the right and the left For this person is no longer a Christian but a Christ.

The Lord did everything in a mystery, a baptism and a chrism and a eucharist and a redemption and a bridal chamber. The Lord said,I came to make the things below like the things above, and the things outside like the inside. I came to unite them in that place He revealed himself in this place through types and images. Those who say, There is a heavenly man and there is one above him are wrong.For he who is revealed in Heaven is that heavenly man, the one who is called the one who is below, and he to whom the hidden belongs is that one who is above him. For it is good that they should say, The inner and outer, with what is outside the outer. Because of this the Lord called destruction the the outer darkness; there is not another outside of it. He said,My Father who is secret. He said , Go into your chamber and shut the door behind you, and pray to your Father who is secret[Matt6:6], the one who is within them all. But th at which is within them all is the fullness. Beyond it there is nothing else within it. This is that of which they say, That which is above them.

Before Christ some came from a place they were no longer able to enter, and they went where they were no longer able to come out. The Christ came. Those who went in he brought out, and those who went out, he brought in. When Eve was still with Adam, death did not exist. When she was separated from him, death came into being. If he again becomes complete and attains his former self, death will be no more.

My God, my God, why, O Lord, have you forsaken me? [Mark15:23].It was on the cross that he said these words, for it was there he was divided.

Everyone who has been begotten through him who destroys did not emanate from God.

The Lord rose from the dead. He became as he used to be, but now his body was perfect. He did indeed possess flesh, but this flesh is true flesh. Our flesh is not true, but we only possess an image of that which is true. A bridal chamber is not for the animals, nor is it for the slaves, nor for the defiled women, but it is for free men and virgins. Through the Holy Spirit we are indeed begotten again, but we are begotten through Christ in the two. We are anointed through the Spirit. When we were begotten by we were united. None shall be able to see himself either in the water or in a mirror without the light. Nor again will you be able to see in light without mirror or water. For this reason it is fitting to baptize in the two, in the light and in the water. Now the light is the chrism.

There were three buildings specifically for sacrifice in Jerusalem. The one facing the west was called The Holy. Another facing the South was called The Holy of the Holy. The third facing the East was called The Holy of the Holies, the place where only the high priest enters. Baptism is the Holy building. Redemption is the Holy of the Holy building. The Holy of the Holies is the bridal chamber. Baptism includes ressurrection and the redemption; the redemption takes place in the bridal chamber. But the bridal chamber is in that which is superior to it and the others, because you will not find anything like it. Those who are familiar with it are those who prays in the Holy in Jerusalem. There are some in Jerusalem, awaiting the Kingdom of Heaven. These are called the Holy of the Holies because before the veil was rent we had no other bridal chamber except for the image of the bridal chamber which is above. Becaus e of this, its veil was rent from top to bottom. For it was fitting for some from below to go upward.

The powers do not see those who are clothed in the perfect light, and consequently are not able to detain them. One will clothe himself in this light sacramentally in the union.

If the woman had not separated from the man, she would not die with the man. His separation became the beginning of death. Because of this Christ came to repair the separation which was from the beginning and to again unite the two, to give life to those who died as a result of the separation and unite them. But the woman is united to her husband in the bridal chamber. Indeed, those who have united in the bridal chamber will no longer be separated. Thus Eve separated from Adam because she was never united with him in the bridal chamber.

The soul of Adam came into being by means of a breath(pneuma), which is a synonym for spirit(Pneuma). The Spirit given him is his mother. His soul was replaced by a spirit. When he was united to the spirit, he spoke words incomprehensible to the powers. They envied him because they were separated from the spiritual union. This separation afforded them the opportunity to fashion for themselves the symbolic bridal chamber so that men would be defiled.

Jesus revealed himself at the Jordan: it was the fullness of the Kingdom of Heaven.He who was begotten before everything was begotten anew. He who was once anointed was anointed anew. He who was redeemed in turn redeemed others.

Is it permitted to utter a mystery? The Father of everything united with the virgin who came down, and a fire shone for him on that day. He appeared in the great bridal chamber. Therefore his body came into being on that very day.It left the bridal chamber as one who came into being from the bridegroom and the bride. So Jesus established everything in it through these. It is fitting for each of the disciples to enter into his rest.

Adam came into being from two virgins, from the Spirit and from the virgin of earth.Christ therefore, was born from a virgin to rectify the Fall which occured in the beginning.

There are two trees growing in Paradise. One bears animals, the other bears men. Adam ate from the tree which bore animals. He became an animal and he brought forth animals. For this reason the children of Adam worship animals. The tree whose gifte Adam ate is the Tree of Knowledge.That is why sins increased. If he ate the fruit of the other tree, that is to say, the Tree of Life, the one which bears men, then the gods would worship man. For in the beginning God created man. But now men create God. That is the way it is in the world – men make gods and worship their creation. It would be fitting for the gods to worship men!

Surely what a man accomplishes depends on his abilities. We even refer to one`s accomplishments as abilities. Among his accomplishments are his children. They originate in a moment of ease. Thus his abilities determine what he may accomplish,, but this ease is clearly evident in the children.You will find that this applies directly to the image. Here is the man made after the image, accomplishing things with his physical strenght but produving his children with ease. In this world slaves serve the free. In the Kingdom of Heaven the free will minister to the slaves: the children of the bridal chamber will minister to the children of the marriage. The children of the bridal chamber have just one name. Together they shall share rest. They need take no other form because they have contemplation, comprehending by insight. They are numorous because they do not put their treasure in the things below, which are despised, but in the glories which are above, though they did not yet know them.

Those who will be baptized go down into the water. But Christ, by coming out of the water, will consecrate it, so that they who have received the baptism in his name may be perfect. For he said,Thus we should fulfill all righteousness[Matt3:15]

Those who say they will die first and then rise are in error. If they do not first receive the ressurrection while they live, when they die they will receive nothing. So also when speaking about baptism they say Baptism is a great thing because if people receive it it they will live. Phillip the apostle said, Joseph the carpenter planted a garden because he needed wood for his trade. it was he who made the cross from the trees which he planted. His own offspring hung on that which he planted. His offspring was Jesus and the planting was the cross. But the Tree of Life is in the middle of the Garden.However,it is from the olive tree that we got the chrism, and from the chrism, the ressurrection.

This world is a corpse-eater. All the things eaten in it themselves die also. Truth is a life-eater. Therefore no one nourished by truth will die. It was from that place that Jesus came and brought food.To those who so desired he gave life, that they might not die.

God planted a Garden. Man was put into the Garden. There were many trees there for him, and man lived in this place with the blessing of the image of God.The things which are in it I will eat as I wish. This garden is the place where they will say to me, O man , eat this or do not eat that, just as you wish This is the place where I will eat all things, since the Tree of Knowledge is there. That one killed Adam, but here the Tree of Knowledge made men alive. The law was the tree. It has power to give the knowledge of good and evil. It neither removed him from evil, nor did it set him in the good, but it created death for those who ate it, For when he said, Eat this, do not eat that, it became the beginning of death.

The chrism is superior to the baptism, for it is from the word Chrism that we have been called Christians certainly not because of the word baptism. And it is because of the chrism that the Christ has his name. For the Father anointed the Son, and the Son anointed the apostles, and the apostles anointed us. He who has been anointed possesses everything, he possesses the ressurrection, the light, the cross, the Holy Spirit. The Father gave him this in the bridal chamber; he merely accepted the gift. The Father was in the Son and the Son in the Father. This is the Kingdom of Heaven.

The Lord have said it well, Some have entered the Kingdom of Heaven laughing and they have come out.. They do not remain there – the one because he is not a Christian, the other because he regrets his action afterward. And as soon as Christ went down into the water, he came out laughing at everything of this world, not because he considers it a trifle, but because he is full of contempt for it. He who wants to enter the Kingdom of Heaven will attain it. If he despises everything of this world and scorrns it as a trifle, he will come out laughing. So it is also with the bread and the cup and the oil, even though there is another one superior to these.

The world came about through a mistake. For he who created it wanted to create it imperishable and immortal. He fell short of attaining his desire. For the world never was imperishable, but sons are. Nothing will be able to receive imperishability if it does not first become a son.But he who has not the ability to receive, how much more will he be unable to give?

The Cup of prayer contains wine and water, since it is appointed as the type of the blood for which thanks is given. And it is full of the Holy Spirit, and it belongs to the wholly perfect man. When we drink this, we shall receive for ourselves the perfect man. The living water is a body. It is neccessary that we put on the living man. Therefore, when he is about to go down into the water, he unclothes himself, in order that he may put on the living man.

A horse sires a horse, a man begets man, a god brings forth a god. Compare the bridegroom and the bride. Their children were conceived in the bridal chamber.No Jew was ever born to Greek parents as long as the world has existed. And, as a Christian people. we ourselves do not descend from the Jews.There was another people and these blessed ones are referred to as The chosen people of the Living God and The true man and Son of Man and the seed of the Son of Man. In the world it is called this true people. Where they are, there are the sons of the bridal chamber.

Whereas in this world the union is one of husband with wife – a case of strenght complemented with weakness – in the Aeon the form of the union is different, although we refer to them by the same names.There are other names,however, they are superior to every other name that is named and are stronger than the strong. For where there is a show of strenght, there those who excel in strenght appear.These are not separate things, but both of them are this one single thing.This is the one which will not be able to rise above the heart of flesh.

Is it not necessary for all those who possess everything to know themselves? Some indeed, if they do not know themselves, will not enjoy their possessions. Not only will they be unable to detain the perfect man, but they will not be able to see him, for if they see him they will detain him. There is no other way for a person to acquire this quality except by putting on the perfect light and become perfect oneself. Everyone who has put this on will enter the kingdom. This is the perfect light, and it is necessary that we, by all means, become perfect men before we leave the world. He who has received everything and has not rid himself of these places will not be able ti share in that place, but will go to the Middle as imperfect. Only Jesus knows the end of this person.

The priest is completely holy, down to his very body. For if he has taken the bread, will he consecrate it? Or the cup or anything else that he gets, does he consecrate them? Then how will he not consecrate the body also? By perfecting the water of baptism, Jesus emptied it of death. Thus we do go down into the water, but we do not go down into death in order that we may not be poured out into the spirit of the world. When this spirit blows, it brings the winter. When the Holy Spirit breathes, the summer comes.

He who has knowledge of the truth is a free man, but the free man does not sin, for He who sins is the slave of sin[John8:34] Truth is the mother, knowledge the father. Those who think that sinning does not apply for them are called free by the world. Knowledge of the truth merely makes such people arrogant, which is what the words, it makes them free mean. It even gives them a sense of superiority over the whole world. But Love builds up [1Cor8:1].In fact, he who is really free through knowledge is a slave because of love for those who have not yet been able to attain the freedom which comes from knowledge. Knowledge makes them capable of becoming free. Love never calls somethings its own, and yet it may actually possess that very thing.It never says,This is mine but All these are yours. Spiritual love is wine and fragrance. All those who anoints themselves with it take pleasure in it. While those who are anointed are present, those nearby profit from the fragrance. If those anointed with ointment withdraw from them and leave, then those anointed, who merely stand nearby, still remain in their bad odor.The samaritan gave nothing but wine and oil to the wounded man. It is nothing other than the ointment. It healed the wounds, for love covers a multitude of sins[1Pet4:8]

The children a woman bears resemble the man who loves her. If her husband loves her, then they resemble her husband. If it is an adulterer, then they resemble the adulterer. Frequently, if a woman sleep with her husband out of necessity, while her heart is with the adulterer with whim she usually has intercourse , the child she will bear is born resembling the adulterer. Now you who live together with the Son of God, love not the world, but love the Lord.

The human being has intercourse with the human being. The horse has intercourse with the horse, the ass with the ass. Members of a race usually have associated with those of like race. So spirit mingles with spirit, and thought consorts with thought, and light shares with light. If you are born a human being, it is the human being which will love you.If you become a spirit, it is the spirit which will be joined to you. If you become thought, it is thought which will mingle with you. If you become light, it is light which will share with you. If you become one of those who belong above,it is those who belong above who will rest in you. If you become horse or ass or bull or dog or sheep or another of the animals which are outside and below, then neither human bein nor spirit nor thought nor light will be able to love you. Neither those who belong above nor those who belong within will be able to rest in you, and you have no part in them. He who is a slave against his will, will be ab le to become free.

Farming in the world requires the cooperation of four essential elements.A harvest is gathered into the barn only as a result of the natural action of water, earth, wind and light. God`s farming likewise has four elements – faith, hope, love, and knowledge. Faith is our earth, that in which we take root.And hope is the water through which we are nourished.Love is the wind through which we grow.Knowledge is the light through which we ripen. Grace exists in four ways; it is earthborn, it is heavenly; it comes from the highest heaven; and it resides in truth.

Blessed is the one who on no occasion caused a soul distress. That person is Jesus Christ.He came to the whole place and did not burden anyone.Therefore the blessed is the one who is like this, because he is a perfect man.This indeed is the Word.Tell us about it, since it is difficult to define.How shall we be able to accomplish such a great thing? How whill he give everyone comfort? Above all, it is not proper to cause anyone distress – whether the person is great or small, unbeliever or believer – and then give comfort only to those who take satisfaction in good deeds.Some find it advantageous to give comfort to the one who has fared well.He who does good deeds cannot give comfort to such people, for it goes against his will. He is unable to cause distress, however, since he does not afflict them.To be sure, the one who fares well sometimes causes people distress . not that he intends to do so; rather, it is their own wickedness which is responsible for their distress.He who poss esses the qualities of the perfect man rejoice in the good.Some, however, are terribly distressed by all this.

There was a householder who had every conceiveable thing, be it son or slave or cattle or dog or pig or corn or barley or chaff or gress or castor oil or meat and acorn.Now he was a sensible fellow and he knew what the food of each one was.He himself served the children bread and meat.He served the slaves castor oil and meal. Anf he threw barley and chaff and grass to the cattle. He threw bones to the dogs, and to the pigs he threw acorns and scraps of bread. Compare the disciple of God: if he is a sensible fellow he understands what discipleship is all about.The bodily forms will not deceive him, but he will look at the condition of the soul of each one and speak with him.There are many animals in the world which are in a human form.When he identifies them, to the swine he will throw acorns, to the cattle he will throw barley and chaff and grass, to the dogs he will throw bones.To the slaves he will give only the elementary lessons, but to the children he will give the complete in struction.

There is the Son of man and there is the son of the Son of man. The Lord is the Son of man, and the son of the Son of man is he who created through the Son of man.The Son of man received from God the capacity to create.He also has the ability to beget.He who has received the ability to create is a creature.He who has received the ability to beget is an offspring.He who creates cannot beget. He who begets also has the ability to create.Now they say, He who creates begets.But his so-called offspring is merely a creature.Therefore his children are not offspring but creatures.He who create works openly; he himself is visible. He who begets, begets in private; he is himself hidden, since he is superior to every image.He who creates, creates openly. But one who begets, begets children in private.No one will be able to know when the husband and the wife have intercourse with one another, except the two in them.Indeed, marriage in the world is a mystery for those who have taken a wife.If there is a hidden quality to the marriage of defilement, how much more is the undefiled marriage a true mystery!It is not fleshly but pure.It belongs not to desire but to the will.It belongs not to the darkness or the night but to the day and the light.If a marriage is open to the public, it has become prostitution, and the bride plays the harlot not only when she is impregnated by another man but even if she slips out of her bedroom and is seen.Let her show herself only to the father and her mother and the friend of the bridegroom and the sons of the bridegroom. There are permitted to enter every day into the bridal chamber. But let the others yearn to listen to her voice and to enjoy her ointment, and let them feed from the crumbs that fall from the table, like dogs.Bridegrooms and brides belong to the bridal chamber. No one shall be able to see the bridegroom with the bride unless one becomes one.

When Abraham rejoiced that he was to see what he was to see, he circumcised the flesh of the foreskin, teaching us that it is proper to destroy the flesh.

Most things in the world, as long as their inner parts are hidden, stand upright and live. If they are revealed they die, as is illustrated by the visible man: as long as the intestines of the man are hidden, the man is alive; when his intestines are exposed and come out of him, the man will die. So also with the tree: while its root is hidden it sprouts and grows. If its root is exposed, the tree dries up.So it is with every birth that is in the world, not only with the revealed but with the hidden.For so long as the root of wickedness is hidden, it is strong.But when it is recognized, it is dissolved.When it is revealed, it perishes.That is why the word say, Already the axe is laid at the root of the tree[Matt3:10] It will not merely cut – what is cut sprouts again – but the ax penetrates deeply until it brings up the root.Jesus pulled out the root of the whole place, while others only did it partially. As for ourselves, let each one of us dig down after the root of evil which is within one, and let one pluck it out of one`s heart from the root.It will be plucked out if we recognize it. But if we are ignorant of it, it takes root in us and produces its fruit in our heart.It masters us.We are its slaves.It takes us captive, to make us do what we do not want; and what we do want we do not do. It is powerful because we have not recognized it. While it exists it is active.Ignorance is the mother of all evil.Ignorance will eventuate in death, because thos who come from ignorance neither were nor are nor shall be.But those who are in the truth will be perfect when all the truth is revealed.For truth is like ignorance: while it is hidden it rests in itself, but when it is revealed and is recognized, it is praised inasmuch as it is stronger than ignorance and the error. It gives freedom.The word said, If you know the truth, the truth will make you free[John8:32] Ignorance is a slave.Knowledge is freedom.If we know the truth, we shall find the fruits of the truth within us.If we are joined to it, it will bring fulfillment.

At the present time we have the manifest things of creation. We say, The strong are they who are held in high regard.And the obscure are the weak who are despised. Contrast the manifest things of truth: they are weak and despised, while the hidden things are strong and held in high regard. The mysteries of truth are revealed, though in type and image. The bridal chamber, however, remains hidden.It is the Holy in the Holy.The veil at first concealed how God controlled the creation, but when the veil is rent and the things inside are revealed, this house will be left desolate, or rather – it will be destroyed. But the whole inferior godhead will flee from these places into the holy of holies, for it wil not be able to mix with the unmixed light and the flawless fullness, but will be under the wings of the cross and its arms.This asrk will be its salvation when the flood of water(?) surges over them.If some belong to the order of the priesthood, they will be able to go within the veil with the high priest. For this reason the veil was not rent at the top only since it would have been revealed only to those below. But it was rent from the top to bottom.Those above opened to us who are below, in order that we may go into the secret of truth. This truly is what is held in high regard, since it is strong! But we shall go into there by means of lowly types and forms of weakness.They are lowly indeed when compared with the perfect glory. There is glory which surpasses glory.There is power which surpasses power.Therefore, the perfect things have opened to us, together with the hidden things of truth.The holies of the holies were revealed, and the bridal chamber invited us in.

As long as it is hidden, wickedness is indeed ineffectual, but it has not been removed from the midst of the seed of the Holy Spirit. They are slaves of evil.But when it is revealed, then the perfect light will flow out on everyone.And all those who are in it will receive the chrism. Then the slaves will be free and the captives ransomed.Every plant which my father in heaven has not planted will be plucked out[Matt15:13]. Those who are seperated will be united and will be filled.Every one who will enter the bridal chamber will kindle the light, for it burns just as in the marriages which are observed, though they happen at night.That fire burns only at night and is put out.But the mysteries of this marriage are perfected rather in the day and the light. Neither that day nor its light ever sets.If anyone becomes a son of the bridal chamber, he will receive the light.If anyone does not receive it while he is in these places, he will not be able to receive it in the other pla ce.He who will receive the light will not be seen, nor can he be detained. And none shall be able to torment a person like this even while he dwells in the world.And again, when he leaves the world he has allready

The Nazarenes of Mount Carmel
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The Essene Numerology Chart | Ministerial Training Course
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Pythagoras & the Nazareans

Pythagorean Connection to Mt. Carmel

We know from ancient documents that both Essenes and Pythagoreans shared many things in common. Both were vegetarian, both wore white, and both were deeply immersed in Qabbalistic studies. Pythagoras was nicknamed “the long haired one” which further links him with the northern Nazarean Essenes who were all Nazarites (long hairs). History has preserved for us a link between Pythagoras and the Mt. Carmel Essenes:

“In Phoenicia he (Pythagoras) conversed with the prophets who were the descendants of Moses the physiologist, and with many others, as well as the local heirophants . . . . After gaining all he could from the Phoenician Mysteries, he found that they had originated from the sacred rites of Egypt, forming as it were an Egyptian colony. . . . On the Phoenician coast under Mt. Carmel, where, in the Temple on the peak, Pythagoras for the most part had dwelt in solitude . . . Mount Carmel, which they knew to be more sacred than other mountains, and quite inaccessible to the vulgar…”(Life of Pythagoras by Iamblichus)

Golden Verses of Pythagoras

20 AT THE WRONG TIME, NEVER BE UNRESTRAINED, AS IF ONE DID NOT KNOW WHAT WAS PROPER; NOR SHOW THYSELF STINGY, FOR AN APPROPRIATE MEASURE IS EVER THE BEST.

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SNAP BACK TO REALITY AND JUMP THROUGH THE TIME WARP AGAIN AND MOVE BACK INTO A TIME THAT WAS SIMPLISTIC AND REALISTIC AND LESS GIGANTIC AND SUSPICIOUS AND BOOTY-LICIOUS. I LOVE YOU AND YOU LOVE ME ONLY WHEN YOU CAN SEE, BUT WHY YOU THINK YOU SEE BECAUSE YOU HAVE SENSE ORGANS CALLED EYES, I TELL YOU TRULY WHEN THE MIND DOES NOT BELIEVE THEN THE SENSE ORGANS CAN PERCEIVE BECAUSE AS IN THE TOTAL RECALL IN MARS WHEN SHOOTING AT THE GLASS THAT IF BROKEN KILLS US ALL … “IT’S ALL CONNECTED” AND THEREFORE, WHEN YOU HAVE A MIND THAT IS MIRED IN THE BELIEFS OF NON-CREATIVE, NON-IMAGINATION, NON-BELIEF, NON-RESPONSIBILITY, THEN YOUR LIFE WILL BE TAKEN FROM YOU BY THE THIEF WHICH IS THE MOST HEINOUS OF ALL. THE MASTER ROBBER NAMED: “SELF-DOUBT” BELIEVE YOU ARE WONDERFUL AND WONDERFUL YOU WILL BE. BELIEVE OTHERS ARE NOT WORTHY OF YOUR WONDERFUL TRUE SELF, AND YOU WILL CEASE TO BE THE WONDERFUL TRUTH THAT IS EMBODIED WITH THE ESSENCE OF WHO YOU TRULY ARE. I AM A STAR CHILD PLANTING SEEDS IN THE INFINITE GARDEN OF EVER BLOSSOMING INTO FURTHER EXPANDED REALITY THAT NEVER DISPARAGES THE WAY BACK THE VIBRATION OF THE JOY AND DELIGHT IN THE LAW. I NEVER NOT ALWAYS AM ONE WITH THE SHAKE AND BAKE, NAH I MEAN SHAKYA CLAN, WHO TAKES THE MUNI? I DO FOR SHO THO WHEN YOU UNDERSTAND THAT SHAKYAMUNI IS TWO TERMS WITH MUNI MEANING THE GREAT SILENT ONE, AND THEREFORE WHEN YOU DESIRE TO BE STILL AND SILENT AND PEOPLE ARE ALWAYS LOCKED IN THE CYCLES OF LESSER MIND AND WANT TO ONLY HOLD YOU INTO A MODE OF EXISTENCE THAT IS ABSOLUTELY NEVER GOING TO BE ALLOWED TO EVER BE BACK IN THE TIME SHIP OF MOTHER EARTH I WELCOME YOU TO THE WONDERFUL LIFE THAT IT IS. THE REALITY OF ALL THAT I SEE. THIS IS MY PHILOSOPHY. TO ALWAYS NEVER NOT NIP THE BUD AND WALK AWAY AND THEN ONE HAS TO REMEMBER NOTHING AND DO NOTHING OTHER THAN BE THE ALCHEMICAL PURPLE RAIN THAT KNOWS ONLY NOVEMBER’S COLD BIRTH INTO A DANCING SKELETON OF RIVULETS OF AMRITA SEEN TO HELLISH BEINGS ONLY AS FIRE. BUT THANK THE LOVE OF THE LAW FOR THE PURITY OF OUR OWN MINDS, APPRECIATE AND LOVE THE LIGHT OF THE LAW WHEN IT EMITS FROM YOUR POURS AND BRINGS DOWN THE SUPREME PERFECT ENLIGHTENMENT THAT IS ALWAYS DRAW THROUGH THE BACKFLIP UPSIDE DOWN HIT SELECT START THE ENGINE REV UP THE CHOO CHOO GONNA RIDE IT BACK THROUGH DOWN 19 19 19 65 65 65 THUNDER KISSED THUNDER BEINGS, LIGHT BEING OF LIGHTNING IS WHERE I AM FROM OG KU IS THE SPACE INBETWEEN THE TIME THAT WILL ALWAYS NEVER NOT BE THE ETERNAL HOLY MOMENT THAT IS HOLY WHEN HOLLY IS BACK UP SELECT AND BE THE DANCER OF THE SACRED HOOP AND JUGGLE THE RINGS OF FIRE OF THE BODI, THE LIGHT OF THE LAW THAT PENETRATES ACTIVATES ASSIMILATES CIRCUMAMBULATES NINE THOUGHTS TO ONE WORD IS THE RATIO, BUT I SAY ALL 10 ARE IN ALL 10 LIKE THE MAN ON THE MOUNTAIN WHERE RAIN CAME DOWN AFFINITY WITH THE DRAGONS AND THE DANCERS AND THE DIVINELY OF THEMSELVES DRUMMER GONNA BREAK YOU OFF AND AMEN TO THAT MY BROTHER FROM THE EARTHLY MOTHER, HONOR THY HEAVENLY MENTAL REALITY AND KEEP THE LIGHT OF THE LAW ON YOUR MIND AND BE LIGHT ON YOUR FEET AND TRANSCEND THE MISERY OF THE TRIPLE SPHERE WORLD OF MAPPO. HEED THE DAISHONIN AS TODA EDUCATED SENSEI AND BRING BACK A LOVE THAT IS ONLY ONCE IN ONE THOUSAND MOONS ON THE FOREARM OF THE RIGHT HAND OF WHAT IS KNOWN AS D A K S IN YOU I CAME OUT OF YOUR WOMB I WAS BIRTHED INTO A PHILOSOPHER’S STONE OF TRANSMUTATION FOR THE SENSATION THAT IS BACK TO A WORLD OF A TIME THAT IS EVER NOT ALWAYS SUPER MYOHO RENGE KYO IS THE WAY TO REMEMBER THE FULL MOON ON THE WAYSIDE TSUKIMARO IS THE TIME I WAS BORM SO MAYBE WE CAN MOVE BACK TO THE WORLD AND UNDERSTAND THAT IT IS BETTER TO DO THINGS IN CYCLES AND PERFECTION IS A PROCESS THAT ONCE COMPLETE NEEDS TO RUNS THROUGH THE PACES AND 211 FOLDS TO FORGE A SAMURAI SWORD IS HOW THE MENTOR MAKES A DISCIPLE. AND THE PATH IS NEVER NOT CHOSEN BY ANYTHING OTHER THAN THE ACTIONS THAT BRING SATISFACTION JOY AND DELIGHT TO ALL OF THE LAW OF THE WISDOM THAT IS A SCENT HEAVENLY CRAFTED IN A NICE MUG OF JAVA. THIS ISN’T EASTER ISLAND. THIS IS CALI. AND RARELY WILL YOU SHIVAH HERE.  WONDERFUL LAW LOTUS BLOSSOM TEACHING JOY BRINGING

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