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8 THE ARTIST

22 March 2015

Point Fifteen, regarding the passage “When living beings witness the end of a kalpa / and all is consumed in a great fire, / this, my land, remains safe and tranquil, / constantly filled with heavenly and human beings. / The halls and pavilions in its gardens and groves / are adorned with various kinds of gems. / Jeweled trees abound in flowers and fruit / where living beings enjoy themselves at ease. / The gods strike heavenly drums, / constantly making many kinds of music. / Māndārava blossoms rain down, / scattering over the Buddha and the great assembly. / My pure land is not destroyed, / yet the multitude see it as consumed in fire, / with anxiety, fear, and other sufferings / filling it everywhere. / These living beings with their various offenses, / through causes arising from their evil actions, / spend asamkhya kalpas / without hearing the name of the three treasures. / But those who practice meritorious ways, / who are gentle, peaceful, honest, and upright, / all of them will see me / here in person, preaching the Law.”

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: This passage is a hymn of praise on the principle of three thousand realms in a single moment of life revealed in the “Life Span” chapter of the essential teaching. The words “When . . . all is consumed in a great fire” in fact signify the great fire of earthly desires. The words “this, my land, remains safe and tranquil” refer to the realm of the environment. The words “where living beings enjoy themselves at ease” refer to the realm of living beings. The words “Jeweled trees abound in flowers and fruit” refer to the realm of the five components. Thus this part of the passage is clearly speaking of the principle of three thousand realms in a single moment of life.
Again we may say that the passage refers to the Ten Worlds. The “great fire” stands for the world of hell, “heavenly drums” stands for that of animals, and “heavenly and human beings” for the two worlds of human and heavenly beings, which are “constantly filled with heavenly and human beings.”
The words “māndārava blossoms” stand for the world of voice-hearers, the words “gardens and groves” stand for that of pratyekabuddhas, the one word “and” in the phrase “the Buddha and the great assembly” stands for the world of bodhisattvas, and the words “scattering over the Buddha” stand for the world of Buddhas. The worlds of asuras and hungry spirits are implied in the lines “with anxiety, fear, and other sufferings / filling it everywhere.” These various worlds are referred to in the words “these living beings with their various offenses.”
However, the revelations in this “Life Span” chapter make clear that “all of them will see me,”6 that is, they make clear the principle of three thousand realms in a single moment of life. Now Nichiren and his followers, who chant Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, are the very persons referred to here.
1) ESSENE.COM:

A) The Nazarenes of Mount Carmel is an esoteric spiritual Order which fully embraces the deeper levels of the ancient Nazorean ‘Way’ of Jesus the Christ. We are a modern resurrection of the ancient Nazorean Christians.

B) THE HEAVENLY FATHER AND I ARE ONE; ANGEL OF ETERNAL LIFE, DESCEND UPON ME AND GIVE ETERNAL LIFE TO MY SPIRIT – GRAVITY – SUPERIOR PLANETS; ANGEL OF CREATIVE WORK, DESCEND UPON HUMANITY AND GIVE ABUNDANCE TO ALL MEN – BEES – CREATIVE WORK; PEACE, PEACE, PEACE, ANGEL OF PEACE, BE ALWAYS EVERYWHERE – MOON – PEACE WITHIN; ANGEL OF SUN, ENTER MY SOLAR CENTER AND GIVE THE FIRE OF LIFE TO MY WHOLE BODY – SOLAR RAYS; ANGEL OF WATER, ENTER MY BLOOD AND GIVE THE WATERS OF LIFE TO MY WHOLE BODY – RIVERS, CREEKS, ETC. – CIRCULATION; ANGEL OF AIR, ENTER MY LUNGS AND GIVE THE AIR OF LIFE TO MY WHOLE BODY – ENERGIES OF ATMOSPHERE – BREATH; THE EARTHLY MOTHER AND I ARE ONE. SHE GIVES THE FOOD OF LIFE TO MY WHOLE BODY – NUTRITION; ANGEL OF EARTH, ENTER MY GENERATIVE ORGANS AND REGENERATE MY WHOLE BODY – TOP SOIL – GROWTH; ANGEL OF LIFE, ENTER MY LIMBS AND GIVE STRENGTH TO MY WHOLE BODY – TREES – VITALITY; ANGEL OF JOY, DESCEND UPON EARTH AND GIVE BEAUTY TO ALL BEINGS – HARMONY; ANGEL OF POWER, DESCEND UPON MY ACTING BODY AND DIRECT ALL MY ACTS – STARS – COSMOVITAL FORCES; ANGEL OF LOVE, DESCEND UPON MY FEELING BODY AND PURIFY ALL MY FEELINGS – SUPERIOR FEELINGS; ANGEL OF WISDOM, DESCEND UPON MY THINKING BODY AND ENLIGHTEN ALL MY THOUGHTS – SUPERIOR THOUGHTS; THE HEAVENLY FATHER AND I ARE ONE.

C) KINGDOM OF THE HEAVENLY FATHER; KINGDOM OF THE EARTHLY MOTHER; CULTURE; HUMANITY – SOCIAL PEACE; FAMILY – FEELING BODY; MIND – THINKING BODY; BODY – ACTING BODY

D) OVERCOMING GRAVITY; CREATIVE WORK OF MAN; PEACE WITHIN; NERVOUS SYSTEM, COSMIC OCEAN OF LIFE; EMOTIONS, COSMIC OCEAN OF LOVEL; THINKING BODY; FINAL UNION WITH COSMIC OCEAN.

E) FOREMOST HONOR THE IMMORTAL DEITIES, AS THE LAW DEMANDS; THEN REVERENCE THY OATH, AND THEN THE ILLUSTRIOUS CHAMPIONS, THEN VENERATE THE DIVINITIES UNDER THE EARTH, DUE RITES PERFORMING; THEN HONOR THY PARENTS, AND ALL THY KINDRED; AMONG OTHERS MAKE THE MOST VIRTUOUS THY FRIEND, LOVE TO MAKE USE OF THEIR KIND WORDS, AND LEARN FROM THEIR DEEDS THAT ARE USEFUL; BUT ALIENATE NOT THE BELOVED COMRADE FOR TRIVIAL OFFENSES, BEAR ALL ONE CAN, WHAT ONE CAN, FOR POWER IS BOUND TO NECESSITY; TAKE THIS WELL TO HEART: ONE MUST GAIN CONTROL OF ONES HABITS – FIRST OVER APPETITE, THEN SLUMBER, AND THEN LUXURY, AND ANGER; WHAT BRINGS ONE, SHAME DO NOT UNTO OTHERS, NOR UNTO THYSELF, FOR THE HIGHEST OF DUTIES IS SELF INTEGRITY. (GOLDEN VERSES OF PYTHAGORAS 1 THROUGH 7 OF 36 TOTAL)

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SUNDAY MARCH 22, 2015

NS1.27.9.16

KIN 248

YELLOW

MAGNETIC

STAR

TONE: 1 MAGNETIC
ATTRACT * PURPOSE * UNIFY

TRIBE: 8 STAR
BEAUTIFY * ART * ELEGANCE

I SPEAK TO YOU.

BE STILL.

KNOW.

I AM.

YELLOW MAGNETIC STAR.

I UNIFY IN ORDER TO BEAUTIFY

I ATTRACT ART

I SEAL THE STORE OF ELEGANCE

WITH THE MAGNETIC TONE OF PURPOSE

I AM GUIDED BY THE POWER OF MY OWN POWER DOUBLED.

READING FOR YELLOW MAGNETIC STAR:

http://spacestationplaza.com/kin.php?sesset=1#destiny_text

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BASIC DAILY SYNCHRONOTRON CALCULATIONS:

http://www.13lunas.net/synchronotronen.htm

GREGORIAN DATE 3/22/2015

NS.1.27.9.16 KIN 248
YELLOW MAGNETIC STAR

SOLAR MOON YEAR POWER OF UNIVERSAL WATER

SOLAR JAGUAR MOON POWER OF PULSE

HEPTAD 35
BLUE HEPTAD: PATIENCE TRANSFORMS CONDUCT
SOLAR JAGUAR MOON PATH OF UNNER RADIANCE
THE TWO ELECTRO-ETHERIC MERIDIANS
HEPTAD PATH 35, DEATH ELECTRIFIES SELF-GENERATION

KIN 248

LAMAT
YELLOW MAGNETIC STAR POWER OF: ELEGANCE

KIN 248 – PRECEPT 40 – SPIRITUAL SELF-SUFFICIENCY IS A FUNCTION OF DISCIPLINE WHICH IS A CONTINUING SPIRITUAL SACRIFICE OF THE LOWER SELF FOR THE SAKE OF INNER PERFECTION, OR THE COMING OUT AND POLISHING OF THE DIVINE INCARNATE SELF OR FORM WITHIN.

365 COSMIC HISTORY QUOTES

PSI CHRONO 178 ETZNAB WHITE SOLAR MIRROR
POWER OF: ENDLESSNESS

WAVESPELL 20
YELLOW MAGNETIC STAR
POWER OF: ELEGANCE

ORACLE STAR GUIDE MIRROR ANTIPODE MONKEY ANALOG SKYWALKER OCCULT FOR STAR DESTINY

MEET THE GALACTIC ARCHETYPES

THE ADJUSTMENT OF THE LOWER WILL TO THE DVINE WILL IS A MANIFEST ACT OF EVOLUTIONARY CONSCIOUSNESS. TO PROJECT A NEW ARCHETYPE AT FIRST REQUIRES A COMBINATION OF WILL, CONTEMPLATION AND VISUALIZATION. INTENSITY OF PURPOSE IS RESPONSIBLE FOR LIFTING YOU FROM THE WORLD OF MEDIOCRITY INTO THE PULSING WORLD OF HIGHER CONSCIOUSNESS. LEARNING TO PROJECT A NEW ARCHETYPE OR TO CONSTRUCT A COSMIC PERSONALITY IS A LIVING PROCESS, GROWING OUT OF CONSCIOUS DAILY EXERTION AND EXPERIENCE. IT IS DEPENDENT ON THE EXPRESSION OF THE DIVINE ASPECTS IN THE LIFE UPON THE PHYSICAL PLANE.

BMU 300

8
ARTIST

I AM THE ARTIST
CODED BY THE YELLOW STAR
EIGHT IS THE NUMER THAT OPENS MY GATE
RESONANT FREQUENCIES ARE MY PALETTE
TO HARMONIZE ACCORDING
TO THE DEEPEST IMPULSES OF THE UNIVERSE
DARE TO BE BEAUTIFUL!
I AM THE ELEGANCE OF ENLIGHTENMENT
THROUGH MY ART I COLOR YOUR WORLD
I AM THE RAINBOW IN YOUR DAY AND THE
MOON-GLOW IN YOUR NIGHT
I AM THE ARTIST
EVERYTHING I DO ORIGINATES FROM THE STARS
STAR BEING, STAR CHILD, STAR SINGER IS MY NAME
I AM THE GALACTIC CHORD
RESOUNDING FROM THE COSMIC KEY
I INVENT THE SONGS AND RECITE THE CRYSTAL OATH
THAT TRAVELS THE INFINITE ZUVUYA
THE WONDERS OF EVER-EXPANDING HARMONICS
TO KNOW ME IS TO RIDE THE ENDLESS SONG
BACK TO THE MASTER ARTIST OF ALL CREATION

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000

HEPTAD 35/ PRECEPT 35 – WHEN VIEWING YOUR ENTIRE LIFE MOVIE, THE QUALITY OF WHAT YOU EXPERIENCED AND HOW YOU RESPONDED TO THOSE EXPERIENCES CONDITIONS WHAT IS GOING TO HAPPEN TO YOU IN THE NEXT LIFE OR AFTERLIFE.

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000

1ST HEPTAD GATE – 108 – 2ND CIRCUIT – GREEN – ALPHA-ALPHA – RED-RED – YELLOW DALI – CROWN
2ND HEPTAD GATE – 291 – 5TH CIRCUIT – PURPLE – ALPHA-BETA – RED-BLUE – RED SELI – ROOT
3RD HEPTAD GATE – 144 – 2ND CIRCUIT – GREEN – BETA-BETA – BLUE-BLUE – WHITE GAMMA – 3RD EYE
4TH HEPTAD GATE – 315 – 5TH CIRCUIT – PURPLE – BETA-ALPHA – BLUE-RED – BLUE KALI – SECRET CENTER
5TH HEPTAD GATE – 414 – 8TH CIRCUIT – LIGHT PURPLE – HYPER-ELECTRON – YELLOW ALPHA – THROAT
6TH HEPTAD GATE – 402 – 8TH CIRCUIT – LIGHT PURPLE – NEUTRON – RED LIMI – SOLAR PLEXUS
7TH HEPTAD GATE – 441 – SIRIUS BETA-52 HOLOMIND PERCEIVER

H5 – V11 – ALPHA-BETA – RED-BLUE – 291 – RED SELI – SELI: HEPTAD GATE 2 OPENS CIRCUIT 5 – 2ND MENTAL SPHERE SUNCONSCIOUS – HRAM – ROOT

HEPTAD 35
HEPTAD PATH FREQUENCY: 702
BMU: 261
KIN EQUIVALENT: 182

2ND HEPTAD GATE:

SELI – MIDDLE BACK OF HEAD
SEAT OF THE POWER OF COSMIC KNOWLEDGE – ALPHA-BETA – EARTH GK
BMU: 291
VERTICAL COORDINATE: V11
HORIZONTAL COORDINATE: H5
MOON-DAY: 9.16

TIME MATRIX

BMU: 96

SPACE MATRIX

BMU: 360

SYNCHRONIC MATRIX

BMU: 282

MASTER COORDINATING TFI

TIME MATRIX TFI: 222

MASTER COORDINATING BMU: 437

MASTER COORDINATING TFI KIN EQUIVALENT (KE): 19 BLUE RHYTHMIC STORM

CUMULATIVE HARMONIC FREQUENCY TFI: 2834

CUMULATIVE HARMONIC FREQUENCY BMU: 188

KIN EQUIVALENT: 234 – WHITE COSMIC WIZARD

===

+++
000

SOLAR JAGUAR MOON PATH OF INNER RADIANCE
THE TWO ELECTRO-ETHERIC MERIDIANS
HEPTAD PATH 35, DEATH ELECTRIFIES SELF-GENERATION

HEPTAD GATE BMU 108 291 144 315 414 402 441

MANTRA – OM – HRAM – HRAHA – HRIM – HRAUM – HRUM – HRAIM
MANTRA – CROWN – ROOT – 3RD EYE – SECRET CENTER – THROAT – SOLAR PLEXUS – HEART
PLASMA – DALI – SELI – GAMMA – KALI – ALPHA – LIMI – SILIO

MASTER COORDINATING TFI: – 1515 – 1319 – 1394 – 1719 – 1884 – 1496 – 1577

CUMULATIVE HARMONIC FREQUENCY TFI- 2834 (SELI)

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“The Synchronotron is the work of Jose Arguelles/Valum Votan and Stephanie South/Red Queen
To learn more see lawoftime.org/synchronotron and Book of the Cube, Cosmic History Chronicles Vol. VII” – http://www.13lunas.net/synchronotronen.htm

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http://www.nichirenlibrary.org/

A) Soka Gakkai Nichiren Buddhism Library In this library, we make available to the public in searchable form the following English-language translations of works essential to the study of Nichiren Buddhism: The Writings of Nichiren Daishonin, volumes I and II (referred to in citation as WND-1 and WND-2), The Lotus Sutra and Its Opening and Closing Sutras (LSOC), The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings (OTT), and, as a reference to assist with study of these works, The Soka Gakkai Dictionary of Buddhism.

B) http://www.nichirenlibrary.org/en/wnd-1/toc/

1) VOLUME ONE: THE publication in a single volume of the translations of 172 writings of Nichiren Daishonin, including his five major works, is indeed wonderful news, not only for members of the Soka Gakkai International (SGI), but for all English-speaking people interested in Buddhism. This volume is the translation of works in the Nichiren Daishonin gosho zenshū (The Complete Works of Nichiren Daishonin). Now a good half of the contents of that volume has been translated and published in English. (***CC SEE FOREWORD TO VOLUME ONE) Thus I am praying that, with great seeking spirit and deep faith, SGI friends throughout the world will tackle the serious study of the Gosho.
In conclusion, I would like to express my heartfelt appreciation to the staff of the Gosho Translation Committee, who were in charge of the translation and editing of this volume. I also offer my deep gratitude to Dr. Burton Watson, the translator of The Lotus Sutra, who made so many invaluable contributions in translation.” – Daisaku Ikeda, President, Soka Gakkai International

i) IF you wish to free yourself from the sufferings of birth and death you have endured since time without beginning and to attain without fail unsurpassed enlightenment in this lifetime, you must perceive the mystic truth that is originally inherent in all living beings. This truth is Myoho-renge-kyo. Chanting Myoho-renge-kyo will therefore enable you to grasp the mystic truth innate in all life. (***CC SEE GOSHO ONE VOLUME ONE) If you chant Myoho-renge-kyo with deep faith in this principle, you are certain to attain Buddhahood in this lifetime. That is why the sutra states, “After I have passed into extinction, [one] should accept and uphold this sutra. Such a person assuredly and without doubt will attain the Buddha way.” Never doubt in the slightest.
Respectfully. – Maintain your faith and attain Buddhahood in this lifetime. Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, Nam-myoho-renge-kyo.”” – Nichiren

B) http://www.nichirenlibrary.org/en/wnd-2/toc/

1) VOLUME TWO: 215 – On the Ten Chapters of “Great Concentration and Insight” (***CC) If the Tendai school follows the same sort of interpretation as these other schools, then what is the use of having a Tendai school separate from the other schools? (***CC SEE GOSHO 215 VOLUME TWO) In the case of the sutras preached before the Lotus, one uses the theoretical teaching to explain the meaning of the words. And in the case of the theoretical teaching, one uses the essential teaching to explain the meaning of the words. Only in the case of the essential teaching does one use the actual words themselves to explain the meaning. There are many different kinds of practices in the perfect teaching. Counting grains of sand and contemplating the great ocean are among them, as of course are the practice of reciting the sutras that preceded the Lotus and intoning the names of Amida Buddha and the other Buddhas. These, however, are practices to be carried out on particular occasions or at particular times. The true perfect teaching practice is to keep the mouth constantly reciting Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, whatever the occasion, and to keep the mind fixed on the meditation on the three thousand realms in a single moment of life. This is the practice and understanding of persons of wisdom. For the ordinary lay believers of Japan, however, it is sufficient if they concentrate solely on the recitation of Nam-myoho-renge-kyo. The name will invariably invoke all the blessings of the thing itself. It has been said that there are seventeen names for the Lotus Sutra, but these are names that are common to other writings as well. The particular name of the sutra, that by which all the Buddhas of the three existences of past, present, and future invoke it, is Nam-myoho-renge-kyo.
Amida, Shakyamuni, and all the other Buddhas, when they were creating the cause for the attainment of enlightenment, invariably fixed their minds on the practice of concentration and insight, and with their mouths they invariably recited Nam-myoho-renge-kyo. (***CC) With regard to the lawsuit, if the cause of my action is reasonable enough, I think it will be difficult to reach a settlement [because the High Court at Kamakura harbors prejudice against me]. And, as people say, legal inquiries are not like matters of religious doctrine, and it was wise of us to have raised a suit. Therefore, there would seem to be even less hope for a quick settlement. Word has come that the Lesser Aide of Judicial Affairs has turned the suit over to Hei no Saburō Saemon [to avoid a settlement]. Under these circumstances, you should consider that the longer the case drags on, the better are the prospects. A settlement will probably be reached eventually, and if it is not, people will understand that there is a reasonable cause on my side, so you should not fret over the delay. At the moment I have a number of Tendai and True Word persons visiting me and am very busy with them and other things, so I will end this here.

C) http://www.nichirenlibrary.org/en/lsoc/toc/

1) From early times the Lotus Sutra has been known as “the king of the sutras.” This is above all because it is “a scripture of great hope” that brings light to the hearts of all people. The Lotus Sutra clearly and definitively reveals the buddha nature that is an integral part of the lives of all people. And it makes clear that the Buddha desires and acts so that all people, by opening up this buddha nature inherent within themselves, may attain the state of buddhahood for themselves. The sutra further stresses that the continued observance of such action is the true mission of the bodhisattva, and never ceases to praise the observance of this practice.
The buddha nature, which is inherent in all living beings, is a universal and fundamental source or fountain of hope. When it is fully brought to light, it allows all human beings to realize their highest level of personal development and to attain unparalleled happiness and good fortune. And the Lotus Sutra is the text that most forcefully asserts this truth. (***CC SEE LSOC – FOREWORD) For humankind as a whole, the twenty-first century represents the crucial, the now-or-never moment for the establishment of peace. Therefore I firmly believe that now is the time to work more tirelessly than ever to propagate and establish this philosophy of hope set forth in the Lotus Sutra, a scripture that delves into the very fundamentals of human life, and that this opportunity must not be missed. For that reason it is with profound joy that, at the start of this, the twenty-first century, I greet the publication of this Soka Gakkai edition of The Lotus Sutra and Its Opening and Closing Sutras as it makes its way out into the world. I would like in conclusion to express my thanks to Dr. Burton Watson for his painstaking English translation of the three sutras. Daisaku Ikeda President of Soka Gakkai International

2) Immeasurable Meanings Sutra: 1 Virtuous Practices: This is what I heard:
At one time the Buddha was in Rajagriha, staying on Mount Gridhrakuta. Accompanying him were a multitude of leading monks numbering twelve thousand persons. (***CC) We are moved, and all together bow our heads, dedicating ourselves to one who has accomplished what is hard to accomplish. (***C) Immeasurable Meanings Sutra: 2 – Preaching the Law – At that time the bodhisattva mahasattva Great Adornment and the others of the eighty thousand bodhisattvas mahasattva, having spoken these verses in praise of the Buddha, all together addressed the Buddha, saying: “World-Honored One, we, this multitude of eighty thousand bodhisattvas, now desire to pose some questions regarding the Law of the thus come one. We wonder if the world-honored one will be kind enough to listen?” (***CC ) All were able to acquiesce and obey and to turn the unregressing wheel of the Law. Immeasurable numbers of living beings conceived the desire for supreme perfect enlightenment. (***CC) Immeasurable Meanings Sutra: 3 Ten Benefits ( pp.20 – 32 ) – At that time the bodhisattva mahasattva Great Adornment addressed the Buddha once more, saying: “World-Honored One, the world-honored one has preached this subtle, wonderful, profound, unsurpassed great vehicle Immeasurable Meanings Sutra. Truly it is profound, profound, profound! Why do I say so? Because in this assembly when the bodhisattvas mahasattva, the four kinds of believers, the heavenly beings, dragons, and spirits, the kings of states, ministers, and subjects, and other living beings hear this profound, unsurpassed great vehicle Immeasurable Meanings Sutra, there are none who fail to gain dharani teachings, the three doctrines, four stages, or the desire to attain enlightenment. (***CC) At that time all the members of the great assembly were filled with great joy. Bowing in obeisance to the Buddha, they accepted and upheld his teaching and then departed.

3) http://www.nichirenlibrary.org/en/lsoc/Content/1

CHAPTER 01) This is what I heard: (***CC)
CHAPTER 02) (***CC)“But stop, Shariputra, I will say no more. Why? Because
what the buddhas have achieved is the rarest and most difficult-to-understand Law. The true aspect of all phenomena can only be understood and shared between buddhas. This reality consists of the appearance, nature, entity, power, influence, internal cause, relation, latent effect, manifest effect, and their consistency from beginning to end.” (***CC)
CHAPTER 07) (***CC) Now I expound the truth for you—
what you have attained is not extinction.
For the sake of the comprehensive wisdom of the buddha
you must expend great effort and diligence.
When you have gained such buddha attributes
as comprehensive wisdom and the ten powers,
and are endowed with the thirty-two features,
then this will be true extinction.
The buddhas in their capacity as leaders
preach nirvana to provide a rest.
But when they know you have become rested,
they lead you onward to the buddha wisdom.
CHAPTER 11) (***CC) If in that fearful age
one can preach this sutra for even a moment,
one will deserve to receive alms
from all heavenly and human beings.
CHAPTER 15) (***CC) Be diligent and of a single mind,
for I wish to explain this affair.
Have no doubts or regrets—
the buddha wisdom is hard to fathom.
Now you must put forth the power of faith,
abiding in patience and goodness.
A Law that in the past was never heard
you will now all be able to hear.
Now I will bring you ease and consolation—
do not harbor doubts or fears.
The Buddha has nothing but truthful words,
his wisdom cannot be measured.
This foremost Law that he has gained
is very profound, incapable of analysis.
He will now expound it—
you must listen with a single mind. (***CC)
CHAPTER 16) (***CC) Since I attained buddhahood
the number of kalpas that have passed
is an immeasurable hundreds, thousands, ten thousands,
millions, trillions, asamkhyas.
Constantly I have preached the Law, teaching, converting
countless millions of living beings,
causing them to enter the buddha way,
all this for immeasurable kalpas.
In order to save living beings,
as an expedient means I appear to enter nirvana
but in truth I do not pass into extinction.
I am always here, preaching the Law.
I am always here,
but through my transcendental powers
I make it so that living beings in their befuddlement
do not see me even when close by.
When the multitude sees that I have passed into extinction,
far and wide they offer alms to my relics.
All harbor thoughts of yearning
and in their minds thirst to gaze at me.
When living beings have become truly faithful,
honest and upright, gentle in intent,
single-mindedly desiring to see the Buddha,
not hesitating even if it costs them their lives,
then I and the assembly of monks
appear together on Holy Eagle Peak.
At that time I tell the living beings
that I am always here, never entering extinction,
but that because of the power of expedient means
at times I appear to be extinct, at other times not,
and that if there are living beings in other lands
who are reverent and sincere in their wish to believe,
then among them too
I will preach the unsurpassed Law.
But you have not heard of this,
so you suppose that I enter extinction.
When I look at living beings
I see them drowned in a sea of suffering;
therefore I do not show myself,
causing them to thirst for me.
Then when their minds are filled with yearning,
at last I appear and preach the Law for them.
Such are my transcendental powers.
For asamkhya kalpas
constantly I have dwelled on Holy Eagle Peak
and in various other places.
When living beings witness the end of a kalpa
and all is consumed in a great fire,
this, my land, remains safe and tranquil,
constantly filled with heavenly and human beings.
The halls and pavilions in its gardens and groves
are adorned with various kinds of gems.
Jeweled trees abound in flowers and fruit
where living beings enjoy themselves at ease.
The gods strike heavenly drums,
constantly making many kinds of music.
Mandarava blossoms rain down,
scattering over the Buddha and the great assembly.
My pure land is not destroyed,
yet the multitude sees it as consumed in fire,
with anxiety, fear, and other sufferings
filling it everywhere.
These living beings with their various offenses,
through causes arising from their evil actions,
spend asamkhya kalpas
without hearing the name of the three treasures.
But those who practice meritorious ways,
who are gentle, peaceful, honest, and upright,
all of them will see me
here in person, preaching the Law.
At times for this multitude
I describe the Buddha’s life span as immeasurable,
and to those who see the Buddha only after a long time
I explain how difficult it is to meet a buddha.
Such is the power of my wisdom
that its sagacious beams shine without measure.
This life span of countless kalpas
I gained as the result of lengthy practice.
You who are possessed of wisdom,
entertain no doubts on this point!
Cast them off, end them forever,
for the Buddha’s words are true, not false.
He is like a skilled physician
who uses an expedient means to cure his deranged sons.
Though in fact alive, he gives out word he is dead,
yet no one can say he speaks falsely.
I am the father of this world,
saving those who suffer and are afflicted.
Because of the befuddlement of ordinary people,
though I live, I give out word I have entered extinction.
For if they see me constantly,
arrogance and selfishness arise in their minds.
Abandoning restraint, they give themselves up to the five desires
and fall into the evil paths of existence.
Always I am aware of which living beings
practice the way, and which do not,
and in response to their need for salvation
I preach various doctrines for them.
At all times I think to myself:
How can I cause living beings
to gain entry into the unsurpassed way
and quickly acquire the body of a buddha?
CHAPTER 17) (***CC) These people will gratefully accept this sutra, saying,
“Our wish is that in future ages we may use our long lives to save living beings. Just as today the world-honored one, king of the Shakyas, roars like a lion in the place of enlightenment, preaching the Law without fear, so may we too in ages to come, honored and revered by all, when we sit in the place of enlightenment describe our life spans in the same manner.” If there are those profound in mind, pure, honest, and upright, who, hearing much, can retain it all, who follow principle in understanding the Buddha’s words, then people such as this will have no doubts. (***CC)

4) http://www.nichirenlibrary.org/en/ott/toc/

1) FOREWORD – “I view with the greatest pleasure the publication of this English translation of the Ongi kuden, or The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings, by Dr. Burton Watson, a translator of world renown. For it will introduce to the world at large the essence of East Asian Buddhism. Dr. Watson is widely known for his deep understanding of Chinese (***CC)
Nichiren in his comments on the “Never Disparaging” chapter lists fourteen different ways in which one could look at the act of obeisance performed by the bodhisattva as he “went about bowing to people.” In one of these he says, “It is like the situation when one faces a mirror and makes a bow of obeisance: the image in the mirror likewise makes a bow of obeisance to oneself” (p. 165). Here he is pointing to a highly important moral principle that appears to be lacking in modern society, namely, a spirit of mutual trust and mutual esteem, one that understands that when you show respect for others, they will show respect for you.
The principal cause for the sense of alienation that besets human beings in our present-day society is egotism. This is the conclusion reached in the discussions I held some years ago with the historian, Dr. Arnold Toynbee. And how is one to overcome this attachment to egotism? From a Buddhist point of view, it is to be accomplished by ridding human beings of their self-centeredness, of what Buddhism terms the “fundamental darkness” that enshrouds their lives. This is ignorance, a lack of awareness of the true dignity of their existence, of the fact that their own lives are embodiments of the Wonderful Law and that they themselves have from the beginning been Buddhas. And what can wipe out this ignorance is a firm faith, a faith that never doubts the Buddha nature within all men and women, never doubts the dignity of their inner beings. The engendering of such faith is now humankind’s greatest need, is it not?
An organization of people who are spreading Nichiren’s philosophy of peace and life, and who share its doctrines and ideals, exists at present in 190 different countries and regions of the world. The solidarity of men and women who are wakened to the true dignity of life will continue to expand and make it possible that war and terrorism be wiped out, and that poverty, destruction of the environment, and other global problems that now threaten humankind be solved. I firmly believe that that day will come, and my one great desire is that it may come as quickly as possible.
In closing, I would like to express my own heartfelt wish that readers will find in this book a fountain of inexhaustible wisdom and that it will enable them to live lives filled with boundless courage and hope.”” – SGI.ORG

Chapter Fifteen: Emerging from the Earth
One important point

Point One, on the passage “Among these bodhisattvas were four leaders. The first was called Superior Practices, the second was called Boundless Practices, the third was called Pure Practices, and the fourth was called Firmly Established Practices. These four bodhisattvas were the foremost leaders and guiding teachers among all the group.”

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: This chapter, “Emerging from the Earth,” is devoted entirely to matters pertaining to the bodhisattvas of the essential teaching, those who were taught and converted by the Buddha in his true identity.1 The action carried out by the bodhisattvas of the essential teaching is Nam-myoho-renge-kyo. This is referred to in the character shō [“advocating” in the compound shōdō, or “advocating and guiding”]. The character dō signifies that they will lead and guide all the living beings of the country of Japan to the Pure Land of the Holy Mountain [Eagle Peak]. As for these guiding teachers of p.118the Latter Day of the Law, the term “teachers” can only be applied to the bodhisattvas of the essential teaching.
In explaining the identity of the four great bodhisattvas described here, volume nine of Supplement to “The Words and Phrases,” following the explanation given in volume nine of Words and Phrases, says, “The four leaders described in the sutra passage here represent the four virtues. Superior Practices represents the virtue of true self. Boundless Practices represents the virtue of eternity. Pure Practices represents the virtue of purity. And Firmly Established Practices represents the virtue of happiness.
“There are times when a single person possesses all four of these principles. To transcend the two types of death [birth and death in the six paths and birth and death in the higher realms] is known as Superior Practices. To go beyond the two opposing views that life is cut off after one existence or that it is eternally the same is called Boundless Practices. Because one overcomes the five categories of illusions and entanglements,2 that state is designated Pure Practices. And because one is as perfect in virtue as [the Buddha who attained enlightenment under] the bodhi tree, that state is named Firmly Established Practices.”
Nichiren and his followers, who now chant Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, are all followers of these bodhisattvas who emerged from the earth.
Again, one may say that fire is that which burns things [and hence it corresponds to Superior Practices3]. Water is that which purifies things [and hence it corresponds to Pure Practices]. Wind is that which blows away dust and grime [and hence corresponds to Boundless Practices]. The great earth is that which nourishes plants and trees [and corresponds to Firmly Established Practices]. These are the respective merits of the four bodhisattvas. Though p.119the practices of the four bodhisattvas differ from one to another, all are in effect the practice of Myoho-renge-kyo.
These four bodhisattvas dwell in the lower region. Therefore the commentary [Words and Phrases, volume nine] says that they dwell “in the depths of the Dharma nature, the ultimate region of the profound source.” The lower region is where they live and abide, and the lower region represents the principle of truth. Supplement to “The Words and Phrases” says, “The lower region is described by Master Tao-sheng as the place where one abides in the principle (ri).” What emerge and become manifest from this dwelling in the principle are referred to as actual events (ji).
Again, the Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says that, of all the thousand plants and ten thousand trees in the world, there are none that are not in essence bodhisattvas who emerge from the earth. Thus we may say that the bodhisattvas who emerge from the earth are the bodhisattvas of the essential teaching. The word “essential” or “original” represents the merits handed down from the past of numberless major world system dust particle kalpas ago, the merits that are without beginning and without end.
These bodhisattvas are possessors of the essential or original Law. The original Law is Nam-myoho-renge-kyo. This daimoku, Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, is something that is without exception possessed by the bodhisattvas who emerge from the earth, but it is not possessed by the bodhisattvas of the theoretical teaching, those who were taught and converted by the Buddha in his transient status. From the substance of this original Law is derived the function that is propagated as the practice of concentration and insight, and is called the principle of three thousand realms in a single moment of life. In effect, all the explanations given by great and ordinary teachers are directed toward the propagation of this function of the Wonderful Law.
The accepting and upholding of this original Law is expressed in the single word “belief” or “faith.” The single word “belief” is the sharp sword with which one confronts and overcomes p.120fundamental darkness or ignorance. The commentary [Words and Phrases] says, “Belief means to be without doubt.” You should think about this.
The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings, Part One, ends here.
The first day of the first month of the first year of the Kōan era (1278), cyclical sign tsuchinoe-tora

Recorded by Nikkō

Chapter Sixteen: The Life Span of the Thus Come One
Twenty-seven important points

Point One, concerning Chapter Sixteen, The Life Span of the Thus Come One Nam-myoho-renge-kyo

The Words and Phrases of the Lotus Sutra, volume nine, says: “Thus Come One is a general designation for the Buddhas of the ten directions and the three existences, for the two Buddhas, the three Buddhas,1 the Buddha of the essential teaching, and the Buddha of the theoretical teaching. Specifically, it is a special designation for the three Buddhas of the original state. Juryō, or Life Span, refers to an overall reckoning. It indicates an overall reckoning of the benefits of the two Buddhas, the three Buddhas, and all the Buddhas of the ten directions and the three existences. Therefore the chapter is called the Juryō-hon, or [Reckoning of] the Life Span chapter.”

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: The title of this chapter deals with an important matter that concerns Nichiren himself. This is the transmission described in the “Supernatural Powers” chapter. The Thus Come One is Shakyamuni Buddha or, more generally speaking, all the Buddhas of the ten directions and the three existences. Or, more specifically, it refers p.124to the Buddha of the original state who is eternally endowed with the three bodies.
Now it is the understanding of Nichiren and his followers that, generally speaking, the term “Thus Come One” refers to all living beings. More specifically, it refers to the disciples and lay supporters of Nichiren.
This being the case, the term “eternally endowed with the three bodies” refers to the votaries of the Lotus Sutra in the Latter Day of the Law.
The title of honor for one who is eternally endowed with the three bodies is Nam-myoho-renge-kyo. This is what the three great concerns of actuality2 of the “Life Span” chapter refer to.
Speaking in terms of the six stages of practice, the Thus Come One in this chapter is an ordinary mortal who is in the first stage, that of being a Buddha in theory. When one reverently accepts Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, one is in the next stage, that of hearing the name and words of the truth. That is, one has for the first time heard the daimoku. When, having heard the daimoku, one proceeds to put it into practice, this is the third stage, that of perception and action. In this stage one perceives the object of devotion that embodies the three thousand realms in a single moment of life. When one succeeds in overcoming various obstacles of illusions, this is the fourth stage, that of resemblance to enlightenment. When one sets out to convert others, this is the fifth stage, that of progressive awakening. And when one comes at last to the realization that one is a Buddha eternally endowed with the three bodies, then one is a Buddha of the sixth and highest stage, that of ultimate enlightenment.
Speaking of the chapter as a whole, the idea of gradually overcoming illusions is not the ultimate meaning of the “Life Span” chapter. You should understand that the ultimate meaning of this chapter is that ordinary mortals, just as they are in their original states of being, are Buddhas.
p.125And if you ask what is the action or practice carried out by the Buddha eternally endowed with the three bodies, it is Nam-myoho-renge-kyo.

Point Two, regarding the words “You must listen carefully and hear of the Thus Come One’s secret and his transcendental powers.”

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: This passage supports the concept of one who is eternally endowed with the three bodies. Various interpretations on these words have been transmitted.
As for the transcendental powers, the actions that are carried out instant by instant, motion by motion, by us living beings are regarded as transcendental powers. Thus the voices of the wardens of hell punishing the offenders are all to be termed transcendental powers. The countless things in the three thousand realms that undergo the process of birth, abiding, change, and extinction, are all in themselves embodiments of transcendental powers.
But in the view of Nichiren and his followers, the realization and understanding of the concept of attainment of Buddhahood in one’s present form is what is meant by “the Thus Come One’s secret and his transcendental powers.” For outside of the attainment of Buddhahood, there is no “secret” and no “transcendental powers.”
The eternally endowed three bodies mentioned here are gained through a single word. And that single word is “faith” or “to believe.” Therefore the sutra says, “We will believe and accept the Buddha’s words” (chapter sixteen). You should stop and consider the meaning of these two words “believe” and “accept.”

Point Three, regarding the words “But good men, it has been immeasurable, boundless hundreds, thousands, ten thousands, millions of nayutas of kalpas since I in fact attained Buddhahood.”

p.126The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: “I in fact” is explaining that Shakyamuni in fact attained Buddhahood in the inconceivably remote past. The meaning of this chapter, however, is that “I” represents the living beings of the Dharma-realm. “I” here refers to each and every being in the Ten Worlds. “In fact” establishes that “I” is a Buddha eternally endowed with the three bodies. This is what is being called “fact.” “Attained” refers both to the one who attains and to the thing attained. “Attain” means to open or reveal. It is to reveal that the beings of the Dharma-realm are Buddhas eternally endowed with the three bodies. “Buddhahood” means being enlightened to this.
In the word “since” (irai), the element i (already, or having passed) refers to the past, and the element rai (coming) refers to the future. And the present is included in these two elements i and rai.
The passage is thus saying that “I [or the beings of the Dharma-realm] in fact revealed” the Buddhahood that is immeasurable and boundless in both past and future. It is referring to the hundred worlds and thousand factors and the three thousand realms in a single moment of life. The two words “hundred” and “thousand” in the sutra passage refer to the hundred worlds and the thousand factors. These then represent the reality of three thousand realms in a single moment of life.
Now Nichiren and his followers, those who chant Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, are the original lords of teachings of the “Life Span” chapter. Generally speaking, the bodhisattvas of the theoretical teaching are not the sort of persons who are qualified to handle this chapter. For they employ an approach in which the theoretical teaching is on the surface and the essential teaching is in the background, while Nichiren and his followers employ an approach in which the essential teaching is in the forefront and the theoretical teaching is in the background.
Be that as it may, this chapter does not represent the teaching that is essential for the Latter Day of the Law. The reason is that this chapter embodies the Buddhism of the harvest suitable for the time when the Buddha was in the world. But only the five p.127characters of the daimoku constitute the Buddhism of sowing that is suitable for the present time. Thus, the Buddhism of the harvest is for the time when the Buddha was in the world, and the Buddhism of sowing is for the time after his passing. Hence it is the Buddhism of sowing that is needed in the Latter Day of the Law.

Point Four, regarding the passage “The Thus Come One perceives the true aspect of the threefold world exactly as it is. There is (u) no (mu) ebb or flow of birth and death, and there is no existing in this world and later entering extinction.”

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: The “Thus Come One” is the living beings of the threefold world. When we look at these living beings through the eyes of the “Life Span” chapter, we can see and understand the true aspect of these beings who in their original states possess the Ten Worlds.
The aspect or characteristics of the threefold world are birth, aging, sickness, and death. But if we look at birth and death in terms of their true nature, then there is no birth or death. And if there is no birth or death, then there is no ebb or flow. Not only do birth and death not exist. To look on birth and death with repulsion and try to escape from them is termed delusion, or a viewpoint of acquired enlightenment.3 Seeing and understanding the originally inherent nature of birth and death is termed awakening, or original enlightenment.
Now when Nichiren and his followers chant Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, they realize the originally inherent nature of birth and death, and the originally inherent nature of ebb and flow.
We may also say that nonexistence (mu) and existence (u), birth and death, ebbing and flowing, existing in this world and p.128entering extinction, are all, every one of them, actions of the eternally abiding inherent nature.
“Nonexistence” indicates that the actions of Myoho-renge-kyo are none other than the Dharma-realm. “Existence” indicates that hell, just as it is, is the total entity of the Wonderful Law originally endowed with the Ten Worlds. “Birth” indicates the Wonderful Law appearing as birth in accordance with changing circumstances. “Death” is death as seen through the “Life Span” chapter, in which the Dharma-realm is at the same time the true aspect of reality. Because there is “ebb,” there is “entering extinction,” and because there is “flow,” there is “existing in the world.”
Thus [in terms of the three truths], nonexistence, death, ebbing, and extinction represent the truth of non-substantiality or emptiness. Existence, birth, flowing, and existing in the world represent the truth of temporary existence. And [the true aspect of the threefold world that] the Thus Come One perceives exactly as it is, is the truth of the Middle Way.
[In terms of the three bodies], nonexistence, death, ebbing, and extinction represent the eternally endowed reward body. Existence, birth, flowing, and existing in the world represent the eternally endowed manifested body. And [the true aspect of the threefold world that] the Thus Come One perceives exactly as it is, is the eternally endowed Dharma body.
These three bodies are our own single bodies. This is why [Words and Phrases, volume nine] says, “The single body is none other than the three bodies, a statement that is secret.” And this is also why it says, “The three bodies are none other than the single body, a statement that is secret.”
Thus the Buddha of the Lotus that is the entity of the Law (chapter eleven, point six), who is eternally endowed with the three bodies, is Nichiren and his disciples and lay supporters. That is because they embrace the title of honor, Nam-myoho-renge-kyo.

Point Five, regarding the passage “Because if the Buddha remains in the world for a long time, those persons with p.129shallow virtue will fail to plant good roots but, living in poverty and lowliness, will become attached to the five desires and be caught in the net of deluded thoughts and imaginings.”

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: This passage in the sutra explains that, if the Buddha remains in the world for a long time, then people with shallow virtue will fail to plant good roots, and meanwhile will become caught in the net of deluded thoughts or views.
Essentially, these “persons with shallow virtue” are living beings who failed to heed the Law when the Buddha was in the world and now, after his passing, have been born in this country of Japan. They are the so-called slanderers of the Law such as the believers of the Nembutsu, Zen, and True Word teachings.
In the phrase “fail to plant good roots,” the term “good roots” refers to the daimoku. “Fail to plant” refers to those who have yet to embrace the daimoku.
“Imaginings” refers to assertions such as that one should “discard, close, ignore, and abandon” the Lotus Sutra, or that the Lotus Sutra ranks in third place among the sutras. Views such as these are called “imaginings.”
The word “deluded” refers to sutra teachings that are based on the deluded words of the provisional teachings. “Thoughts” refers to mistaken views. To insist that the Lotus Sutra, first among the sutras, actually ranks third is an example of a mistaken view. “In the net of” means in the company of persons who slander the Law and do not have faith.
Now Nichiren and his followers, who chant Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, are persons who have abandoned those sutras that embody deluded views and the company of those who are “caught in the net.”

Point Six, regarding the passage “After he has gone, the children drink some kind of poison that makes them distraught with pain and they fall writhing to the ground.”

p.130The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: “Some kind” refers to [the kind administered by] the priests of the Nembutsu, Zen, and True Word teachings, who slander the Law. “Poison” refers to the expedient means of the provisional teachings, that is, something other than the good medicine of the Lotus Sutra. Therefore “the children” become confused and distraught. “Distraught” means to be deprived of breath. They have become distraught because they lack the life force of the “Life Span” chapter. “They fall writhing to the ground” indicates that they fall into the Avīchi hell.
Regarding the passage on the children who drink poison, the commentary [Words and Phrases, volume nine] says, “To believe and accept the doctrines of erroneous teachers is referred to as ‘drinking poison.’”
The children represent those who slander the Law, and the poison that is drunk is the provisional doctrines of Amida, Mahāvairochana, and their like. But now when Nichiren and his followers chant Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, they are not drinking poison.

Point Seven, on the words “Some are completely out of their minds, while others are not.”

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: The words “completely out of their minds,” or more literally, “had lost their original minds,” refer to slandering of the Law. “Original minds” refers to the seeds of enlightenment sown by the Buddha. “While others are not” refers to the votaries of the Lotus Sutra.
To “lose” or be “out of one’s mind” here means to lose something that one originally possessed. The fact that now Nichiren and his followers chant Nam-myoho-renge-kyo is an indication that they have not lost their original minds.

Point Eight, regarding the passage “Gathering fine medicinal herbs that meet all the requirements of color, fragrance and flavor, he grinds, sifts, and mixes them together. p.131Giving a dose of these to his children, he tells them: ‘This is a highly effective medicine, meeting all the requirements of color, fragrance, and flavor. Take it and you will quickly be relieved of your sufferings and will be free of all illness.’”

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: This passage of the sutra deals with the three truths of non-substantiality, temporary existence, and the Middle Way, and with the three types of learning, namely, precepts, meditation, and wisdom. These are the “highly effective medicine, meeting all the requirements of color, fragrance, and flavor.”
“Grinding” stands for the truth of non-substantiality, “sifting” for the truth of temporary existence, and “mixing together” for the truth of the Middle Way. “Giving” means to deliver or entrust something to someone, and the “children” are the votaries of the Lotus Sutra. When [he gives a dose to his children and] they take it, this indicates that they accept and uphold [the Lotus Sutra]. The passage is saying that it is “a highly effective medicine, meeting all the requirements of color, fragrance, and flavor.” “All” here means that it is the highly effective medicine of Nam-myoho-renge-kyo that includes the ten thousand practices, ten thousand good acts, and the various pāramitās.
The words “color, fragrance” mean that “there is not one color or one fragrance that is not the Middle Way”4 and refer to the attainment of Buddhahood by plants and trees. This means, then, that in the five characters of the daimoku there is not a single thing that is not included. Therefore, if we take a dose of it, we will “quickly be relieved of our sufferings.”
For this reason, taking the highly effective medicine of the Wonderful Law will relieve us of the sufferings inflicted by earthly desires, the three poisons of greed, anger, and foolishness.
The votaries of the Lotus Sutra, who chant Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, do not accept the alms of those who slander the Law, and thereby they are relieved of the sickness of greedy desires. The p.132votaries of the Lotus Sutra, though they are cursed and abused, practice forbearance, and thereby they are relieved of the sickness of anger. The votaries of the Lotus Sutra know that they will attain Buddhahood for, as the sutra says, “Such a person assuredly and without doubt / will attain the Buddha way” (chapter twenty-one, Supernatural Powers), and they are thereby relieved of the earthly desires associated with foolishness. This “highly effective medicine” is thus the sweet dew that insures attainment of Buddhahood in the Latter Day of the Law.
Now Nichiren and his followers, who chant Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, are the original possessors of this highly effective medicine.

Point Nine, regarding the passage “Because the poison has penetrated deeply and their minds no longer function as before. So although the medicine is of excellent color and fragrance, they do not perceive it as good.”

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: The words “the poison has penetrated deeply” refer to persons who have become deeply committed to the provisional teachings, an action that constitutes slander of the Law. For that reason, they do not believe or accept the highly effective medicine of the Lotus Sutra. Though one gives them a dose of it, these persons spit it out because “they do not perceive it as good,” that is, it is distasteful to them.
But now Nichiren and his followers, who chant Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, cannot be said to be among those who “do not perceive it as good.”

Point Ten, regarding the passage “I will leave this good medicine here. You should take it and not worry that it will not cure you.”

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: “This good medicine” refers to the sutra teachings or to the relics of the Buddha. But in the Latter Day of the Law it refers to Nam-myoho-renge-kyo.
p.133“Good” indicates something that is favored by all the Buddhas of the three existences, namely, the five characters of the daimoku. “I will leave this” indicates that it is for the Latter Day of the Law. “Here” means the country of Japan in the continent of Jambudvīpa. “You” means all the living beings in the Latter Day of the Law.
“Take it,” or more literally, “take and swallow it,” refers to the ceremony we perform when we accept and uphold the Lotus Sutra. “Swallow” refers to the chanting of the daimoku. From the time we swallow it, we become eternally endowed with the three bodies. Thus we are cured of the sickness of attachment to the Buddha who first attained enlightenment under the bodhi tree.
Now this is what Nichiren and his followers are doing when they chant Nam-myoho-renge-kyo.

Point Eleven, regarding the passage “[Ever] since I attained Buddhahood / the number of kalpas that have passed / is an immeasurable hundreds, thousands, ten thousands, / millions, trillions, asamkhyas.” 5

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: The traditional interpretation of this passage holds that it refers in this one sentence to the three bodies of a Buddha. The word “since” refers to the nine worlds other than Buddhahood, while the word “I” refers to the world of Buddhahood. It is saying that these Ten Worlds are part of the makeup of a Buddha with his eternally endowed three bodies. The Buddha includes both the “since” and the “I,” which makes it clear that he has from the very beginning possessed all Ten Worlds.
p.134“I” stands for the Dharma body, “Buddhahood” stands for the reward body, and “ever” stands for the manifested body. These three bodies have been self-attained by the ancient Buddha who is without beginning or end. The same idea is expressed in the passage that reads, “This cluster of unsurpassed jewels / has come to us unsought” (chapter four, Belief and Understanding). Thus we see that the passages in this chapter that reveal the original enlightenment of the Buddha and the extremely great length of his life span are something never to be found in the other sutra teachings.
Now when Nichiren and his followers chant Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, they are acting as votaries of these words, “since I attained Buddhahood.”

Point Twelve, on the words “In order to save living beings, / as an expedient means I appear to enter nirvana.”

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: This passage of the sutra indicates that the Nirvana Sutra derives from the Lotus Sutra. It is already being referred to as an expedient means.

Point Thirteen, on the words “I am always here, preaching the Law.”

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: “Always here” refers to the place where the votaries of the Lotus Sutra abide. “Here” is the sahā world. “Mountain valleys or the wide wilderness” (chapter twenty-one, Supernatural Powers)—this is what the sutra means when it speaks of “here.”
“Preaching the Law” is the sound of the words of all living beings, that is, the sound of preaching the Law through the wisdom that is freely received and used, a part of their original makeup. Now that we have entered the Latter Day of the Law, preaching the Law means Nam-myoho-renge-kyo. This is the preaching of the Law carried out now by Nichiren and his followers.

p.135Point Fourteen, on the words “Then I and the assembly of monks / appear together on Holy Eagle Peak.”

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: This passage refers to “the assembly on Holy Eagle Peak which continues in solemn state and has not yet disbanded.” “Then,” or the time when this takes place, is the Latter Day of the Law, the time when the Buddha responds to the receptiveness of the people. “I” refers to Shakyamuni Buddha, “and” to the bodhisattvas, and “assembly of monks” to the holy assembly [the voice-hearers and pratyekabuddhas]. “Together” means all the Ten Worlds. “Holy Eagle Peak” is the Land of Eternally Tranquil Light. That is, “at this time ‘I,’ ‘and,’ and ‘the assembly of monks’ appear together on Holy Eagle Peak.”
This must be kept secret! This must be kept secret! This is a clear statement of the actuality of three thousand realms in a single moment of life of the essential teaching. The Gohonzon is the realization and manifestation of this passage. In that sense, the word “together” stands for the principle of eternal and unchanging truth, while the word “appear” stands for the wisdom of the truth that accords with changing circumstances. “Together” is a single moment of life, while “appear” is the three thousand realms.
Again we may say that the word “then” refers to the time when [the Buddha and the others appear in] the sahā world at the time of the essential teaching. [The beings indicated in] this sentence represent the mandala of the Ten Worlds in their entirety. Therefore the time indicated by the word “then” is the fifth five hundred year period, or the Latter Day of the Law. “I” refers to Shakyamuni Buddha, “and” to the bodhisattvas, and “assembly of monks” to the persons of the two vehicles. “Together” refers to [the beings of] the six paths. “Appear” means to be ranged side by side in the Pure Land of Holy Peak [Holy Eagle Peak]. “Holy Peak” refers to the Gohonzon. It also refers to the place where Nichiren and his followers, who chant Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, dwell.

Point Fifteen, regarding the passage “When living beings p.136witness the end of a kalpa / and all is consumed in a great fire, / this, my land, remains safe and tranquil, / constantly filled with heavenly and human beings. / The halls and pavilions in its gardens and groves / are adorned with various kinds of gems. / Jeweled trees abound in flowers and fruit / where living beings enjoy themselves at ease. / The gods strike heavenly drums, / constantly making many kinds of music. / Māndārava blossoms rain down, / scattering over the Buddha and the great assembly. / My pure land is not destroyed, / yet the multitude see it as consumed in fire, / with anxiety, fear, and other sufferings / filling it everywhere. / These living beings with their various offenses, / through causes arising from their evil actions, / spend asamkhya kalpas / without hearing the name of the three treasures. / But those who practice meritorious ways, / who are gentle, peaceful, honest, and upright, / all of them will see me / here in person, preaching the Law.”

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: This passage is a hymn of praise on the principle of three thousand realms in a single moment of life revealed in the “Life Span” chapter of the essential teaching. The words “When . . . all is consumed in a great fire” in fact signify the great fire of earthly desires. The words “this, my land, remains safe and tranquil” refer to the realm of the environment. The words “where living beings enjoy themselves at ease” refer to the realm of living beings. The words “Jeweled trees abound in flowers and fruit” refer to the realm of the five components. Thus this part of the passage is clearly speaking of the principle of three thousand realms in a single moment of life.
Again we may say that the passage refers to the Ten Worlds. The “great fire” stands for the world of hell, “heavenly drums” stands for that of animals, and “heavenly and human beings” for the two worlds of human and heavenly beings, which are “constantly filled with heavenly and human beings.”
The words “māndārava blossoms” stand for the world of p.137voice-hearers, the words “gardens and groves” stand for that of pratyekabuddhas, the one word “and” in the phrase “the Buddha and the great assembly” stands for the world of bodhisattvas, and the words “scattering over the Buddha” stand for the world of Buddhas. The worlds of asuras and hungry spirits are implied in the lines “with anxiety, fear, and other sufferings / filling it everywhere.” These various worlds are referred to in the words “these living beings with their various offenses.”
However, the revelations in this “Life Span” chapter make clear that “all of them will see me,”6 that is, they make clear the principle of three thousand realms in a single moment of life. Now Nichiren and his followers, who chant Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, are the very persons referred to here.

Point Sixteen, on the words “I am the father of this world.”

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: “I” refers to Shakyamuni Buddha, the father of all living beings. The Lotus Sutra assures us that both the Buddha and the sutra itself possess the three virtues of sovereign, teacher, and parent.
The assurance regarding the Buddha is found in the passage concerning the three virtues of the Buddha of the theoretical teaching that reads, “But now this threefold world / is all my domain, / and the living beings in it / are all my children. / . . . I am the only person / who can rescue and protect others” (chapter three, Simile and Parable). As for the three virtues of sovereign, teacher, and parent as they pertain to the Buddha of the essential teaching, the virtue of sovereign is attested in the words “This, my land, remains safe and tranquil” (chapter sixteen); that of teacher in the words “Constantly I have preached the Law, teaching, converting” (ibid.); and that of parent in the words “I am the father of this world.”
The Great Teacher Miao-lo states in his commentary that p.138anyone who does not understand the text of the “Life Span” chapter is no more than a beast who has no understanding of a debt of gratitude [a summary of Miao-lo’s words from The Treatise of Five Hundred Questions].
As for the passages that attest to the fact that the sutra itself possesses these three virtues, the virtue of sovereign is attested in the words “As the Buddha is king of the doctrines, so likewise this sutra is king of the sutras” (chapter twenty-three, Medicine King). The virtue of teacher is attested in the words “this sutra can save all living beings” (ibid.). And the virtue of parent is attested in the words “And as the heavenly king, great Brahmā, is the father of all living beings, so this sutra likewise is father of all sages, worthies,” etc. (ibid.).
Now Nichiren and his followers, who chant Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, are the fathers of all living beings, for we save them from the torments of the hell of incessant suffering. The Nirvana Sutra says, “The varied sufferings that all living beings undergo—all these are the Thus Come One’s own sufferings.” And Nichiren declares, The varied sufferings that all living beings undergo—all these are Nichiren’s own sufferings.

Point Seventeen, on the words “Abandoning restraint, they give themselves up to the five desires / and fall into the evil paths of existence.”

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: “Abandoning restraint” is a term designating slander of the Law. Those who do so are without doubt destined to fall into the Avīchi hell.
But now Nichiren and his followers, who chant Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, are exempted from the fate referred to in this passage of the sutra.

Point Eighteen, on the words “Always I am aware of which living beings / practice the way, and which do not.”

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: This p.139passage concerns the living beings of the Ten Worlds. The words “practice the way” stand for the four noble paths or the four higher worlds of existence, while the words “do not [practice the way]” stand for the six paths or the six lower worlds of existence.
Or again, one may say that “practice the way” represents the worlds of asuras, human beings, and heavenly beings, while “do not [practice the way]” represents the three evil paths.
Ultimately, now that we have entered the Latter Day of the Law, those who “practice the way” are the votaries of the Lotus Sutra, while those who “do not” are the slanderers of the Law. The word “way” stands for the Lotus Sutra. As T’ien-t’ai says, “The term ‘Buddha way’ refers to this sutra [the Lotus] in particular.”
Now Nichiren and his followers, who chant Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, are those who “practice the way,” while those who do not chant it are those who “do not [practice the way].”

Point Nineteen, on the words “At all times I think to myself [literally, make this thought]”

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: “At all times” designates the three existences of past, present, and future. “Myself” refers specifically to Shakyamuni Buddha, and in a more general way to the Ten Worlds.
The words “this thought” in the phrase “make this thought” refer to the eternally inherent single thought of Nam-myoho-renge-kyo. The word “make” here is not the “make” of “made” or “created,” but rather the “make” of “not made” or “not created,” that is, eternal and inherent.
Broadly speaking, in terms of the inherent Ten Worlds, the word “myself” refers to each of the ten thousand entities of those worlds. “This thought” indicates that the voices of the hell wardens as they berate the inmates of hell, as well as all the other various thoughts of living beings, are all of them expressions of the wisdom of the Buddha of limitless joy. All of these are referred to in the word “thought.”
p.140Now the thought expressed by Nichiren and his followers as they chant Nam-myoho-renge-kyo is the thought of great pity and compassion.

Point Twenty, on the words “How can I cause living beings / to gain entry into the unsurpassed way / and quickly acquire the body of a Buddha?”

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: The term “unsurpassed way” refers to the Buddha eternally endowed with the three bodies who is revealed in the “Life Span” chapter. Outside of this, there is no other “body of a Buddha” to be acquired.
Now Nichiren and his followers, who chant Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, will without doubt “acquire the body of a Buddha.”

Point Twenty-one, on the Jigage, or verse (ge) section, that begins with the words Jiga, or “Since I”

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: The word “Since” refers to the nine worlds, while the word “I” refers to the “body of a Buddha.”7 The ge, or verse, presents the principle of the teachings, the principle that both the nine worlds and Buddhahood exist in one’s original state of life. One should ponder it deeply.
The expression of this principle is Nam-myoho-renge-kyo.

Point Twenty-two, on the beginning and end of the Jigage section

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: The word “Since” (ji [which also means self or freely]) marks the beginning of the verse section, and the words “quickly acquire the body (shin) of a Buddha” mark the end. The beginning and end are “since” and “body,” which make up ji-shin (oneself). The words that are in between represent the receiving (ju) and use (yū) [of p.141the boundless benefits inherent in oneself]. Hence the Jigage section represents “the body [inherently endowed with boundless benefits] that is freely received and used” (ji-ju-yū-shin), or the Buddha of limitless joy.
If one realizes that the Dharma-realm is identical with oneself, then the Dharma-realm is the Buddha of limitless joy; hence there is nothing that is not contained in the Jigage section.
“The body that is freely received and used” is none other than the principle of three thousand realms in a single moment of life. Dengyō says, “A single moment of life comprising the three thousand realms is itself ‘the body that is freely received and used’ [or the Buddha of limitless joy].8 ‘The body that is freely received and used’ is the Buddha who has forsaken august appearances. This Buddha who has forsaken august appearances is the Buddha eternally endowed with the three bodies.”
Now Nichiren and his followers, who chant Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, are just this.

Point Twenty-three, on the term kuon, or time without beginning

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: This chapter as a whole deals with the true attainment in kuon. Kuon means something that was not worked for, that was not improved upon, but that exists just as it always has.
Because we are speaking here of the Buddha eternally endowed with the three bodies, it is not a question of something attained for the first time at a certain time, or of something that was worked for. This is not the kind of Buddhahood that is adorned with the thirty-two features and eighty characteristics, or that needs to be improved on in any way. Because this is the p.142eternally abiding Buddha in his original state, he exists just as he always has. This is what is meant by kuon.
Kuon is Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, and “true attainment”9 means awakening to the fact that one is eternally endowed with the three bodies.

Point Twenty-four, on the country of those who are to be converted by the teachings of this “Life Span” chapter and the religious practice to be employed

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: The country where the teachings of this chapter are to be propagated is Japan, or in more general terms, the continent of Jambudvīpa.
Those who are to be converted are all the living beings of Japan. The religious practice to be employed is the mind of faith, faith meaning “to be without doubt.”
Those who administer the teachings are the bodhisattvas of the essential teaching, the Bodhisattvas of the Earth.

Point Twenty-five, concerning the establishment of the object of devotion

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: This object of devotion is based on the passage that reads, “the Thus Come One’s secret and his transcendental powers” (chapter sixteen). The three types of learning, namely, precepts, meditation, and wisdom, are represented by the Three Great Secret Laws embodied in the “Life Span” chapter.
At Holy Eagle Peak, Nichiren without question faced the Buddha and received oral instruction from him in these three great laws. The object of devotion is thus the entity of the entire life of the votary of the Lotus Sutra.

p.143Point Twenty-six, concerning the person or persons to whom the “Life Span” chapter is addressed

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: In the context of the sutra itself, the chapter is addressed to the bodhisattva Maitreya. However, we are thinking basically in terms of the time after the passing of the Buddha. Therefore we must say that it is addressed to all the living beings of the country of Japan, and in particular to Nichiren and his followers, who chant Nam-myoho-renge-kyo.
Maitreya represents the votaries of the Lotus Sutra in the Latter Day of the Law. The name Maitreya means Compassionate One and designates the votaries of the Lotus Sutra.
The Great Teacher Chang-an [in his commentary on the Nirvana Sutra] says, “One who rids the offender of evil is acting as his parent.” Is this not a description of the bodhisattva Maitreya?

Point Twenty-seven, concerning the Buddha eternally endowed with the three bodies
The seed, the august form or appearance of the Buddha or other venerable beings, and samaya, the attributes or manual signs

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: The august form of the Buddha or other venerable beings is a physical representation of the original state endowed with the Ten Worlds. The samaya are the things that inherently belong to the Ten Worlds. The seed represents the single word “faith.”
All these are Nam-myoho-renge-kyo just as it stands. Or we may say that the samaya is the gesture of pressing one’s palms together. Treat these matters as secret. Treat these matters as secret.

POINT ONE CHAPTER FIFTEEN AND 27 POINTS OF CHAPTER 16 = 28 POINTS, 28 DAYS PER MOON SO, CODED TO THE 13MOON.COM MEANS THAT TODAY IS THE 16TH DAY OF THE NINTH MOON, WHICH MEANS THAT TODAY CORRESPONDS TO POINT 15 OF ONGI KUDENS 27 POINTS OF CHAPTER NINE WITH THIS ARRANGEMENT:

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Point Fifteen, regarding the passage “When living beings p.136witness the end of a kalpa / and all is consumed in a great fire, / this, my land, remains safe and tranquil, / constantly filled with heavenly and human beings. / The halls and pavilions in its gardens and groves / are adorned with various kinds of gems. / Jeweled trees abound in flowers and fruit / where living beings enjoy themselves at ease. / The gods strike heavenly drums, / constantly making many kinds of music. / Māndārava blossoms rain down, / scattering over the Buddha and the great assembly. / My pure land is not destroyed, / yet the multitude see it as consumed in fire, / with anxiety, fear, and other sufferings / filling it everywhere. / These living beings with their various offenses, / through causes arising from their evil actions, / spend asamkhya kalpas / without hearing the name of the three treasures. / But those who practice meritorious ways, / who are gentle, peaceful, honest, and upright, / all of them will see me / here in person, preaching the Law.”

The Record of the Orally Transmitted Teachings says: This passage is a hymn of praise on the principle of three thousand realms in a single moment of life revealed in the “Life Span” chapter of the essential teaching. The words “When . . . all is consumed in a great fire” in fact signify the great fire of earthly desires. The words “this, my land, remains safe and tranquil” refer to the realm of the environment. The words “where living beings enjoy themselves at ease” refer to the realm of living beings. The words “Jeweled trees abound in flowers and fruit” refer to the realm of the five components. Thus this part of the passage is clearly speaking of the principle of three thousand realms in a single moment of life.
Again we may say that the passage refers to the Ten Worlds. The “great fire” stands for the world of hell, “heavenly drums” stands for that of animals, and “heavenly and human beings” for the two worlds of human and heavenly beings, which are “constantly filled with heavenly and human beings.”
The words “māndārava blossoms” stand for the world of p.137voice-hearers, the words “gardens and groves” stand for that of pratyekabuddhas, the one word “and” in the phrase “the Buddha and the great assembly” stands for the world of bodhisattvas, and the words “scattering over the Buddha” stand for the world of Buddhas. The worlds of asuras and hungry spirits are implied in the lines “with anxiety, fear, and other sufferings / filling it everywhere.” These various worlds are referred to in the words “these living beings with their various offenses.”
However, the revelations in this “Life Span” chapter make clear that “all of them will see me,”6 that is, they make clear the principle of three thousand realms in a single moment of life. Now Nichiren and his followers, who chant Nam-myoho-renge-kyo, are the very persons referred to here.
E) http://www.nichirenlibrary.org/en/dic/toc/
1) FOREWORD – SOKA GAKKAI DICTIONARY OF BUDDHISM
(***CC) Finally, I want to extend my heartfelt appreciation to those who
have assisted with the preparation and editing of this dictionary. Daisaku Ikeda President, Soka Gakkai International
2) P = 16TH LETTER IN SGI BUDDHIST DICTIONARY, THE WORD LIST IS AS FOLLOWS:

Word
pagoda[塔] (Jpn tō)
Pai-lien-she[白蓮社] (PY Bailianshe; Jpn Byakuren-sha)
Pai-ma-ssu[白馬寺] (PY Baimasi; Jpn Hakuba-ji)
Painfully Acquired[苦得] (Jpn Kutoku)
Pakudha Kacchāyana[迦羅鳩駄迦旃延] (Pali; Jpn Karakuda-kasennen)
pāpīyas[波旬] (Skt; Jpn hajun)
parable of the blind men and the elephant[群盲評象の譬] (Jpn gummō-hyōzō-no-tatoe)
parable of the bright jewel in the topknot[髻中明珠の譬] (Jpn keichū-myōju-no-tatoe)
parable of the burning house[火宅の譬] (Jpn kataku-no-tatoe)
parable of the jewel in the robe[衣裏珠の譬] (Jpn eriju-no-tatoe)
parable of the medicinal herbs[薬草喩] (Jpn yakusō-yu)
“Parable of the Medicinal Herbs” chapter[薬草喩品] (Jpn Yakusōyu-hon)
parable of the phantom city[化城喩] (Jpn kejō-yu)
parable of the phantom city and the treasure land[化城宝処の譬] (Jpn kejō-hōsho-no-tatoe)
“Parable of the Phantom City” chapter[化城喩品] (Jpn Kejōyu-hon)
parable of the skilled physician and his sick children[良医病子の譬] (Jpn rōi-byōshi-no-tatoe)
parable of the three carts and the burning house[三車火宅の譬] (Jpn sansha-kataku-no-tatoe)
parable of the three kinds of medicinal herbs and two kinds of trees[三草二木の譬] (Jpn sansō-nimoku-no-tatoe)
parable of the wealthy man and his poor son[長者窮子の譬] (Jpn chōja-gūji-no-tatoe)
pārājika[波羅夷] (Skt, Pali; Jpn harai)
Paramārtha[真諦] (499–569) (Skt; Jpn Shindai)
pāramitā[波羅蜜] (Skt, Pali; Jpn haramitsu)
parinirvāna[般涅槃・涅槃] (Skt; Pali parinibbāna; Jpn hatsu-nehan or nehan)
Parinirvāna Sutra[般泥洹経] (Jpn Hatsu-naion-gyō)
Pārshva[脇比丘・脇尊者] (n.d.) (Skt; Jpn Kyō-biku or Kyō-sonja)
Parthia[安息国] (Jpn Ansoku-koku)
Pasenadi[波斯匿王] (Pali; Jpn Hashinoku-ō)
Pātaliputra[華氏城] (Skt; Pali Pātaliputta; Jpn Keshi-jō)
path[趣・道] (Skt, Pali gati; Jpn shu or dō)
path of insight[見道] (Jpn ken-dō)
pātra[鉢] (Skt; Jpn hachi or hatsu)
patriarchal Zen[祖師禅] (Jpn soshi-zen)
pattra[貝多羅] (Skt; Jpn baitara)
Peace and Delight[安楽世界] (Skt Sukhāvatī; Jpn Anraku-sekai)
Peace and Sustenance[安養国] (Skt Sukhāvatī; Jpn An’yō-koku or Annyō-koku)
“Peaceful Practices” chapter[安楽行品] (Jpn Anraku-gyō-hon)
peak stage[頂位・頂法] (Jpn chō-i or chō-hō)
Perceiver of Sounds[観音菩薩] (Jpn Kannon-bosatsu)
Perceiver of the World’s Sounds[観世音菩薩] (Skt Avalokitasvara or Avalokiteshvara; Jpn Kanzeon-bosatsu)
“Perceiver of the World’s Sounds” chapter[観音品] (Jpn Kannon-bon)
Perceiver of the World’s Sounds Sutra[観音経] (Chin Kuan-yin-ching; Jpn Kannon-gyō)
perception of the truth of the birthlessness of all phenomena[無生法忍] (Jpn mushō-bōnin)
perception stage[忍位・忍法] (Jpn nin-i or nin-pō)
Perfect Bliss[極楽] (Skt Sukhāvatī; Jpn Gokuraku)
perfect enlightenment[妙覚・円覚] (Jpn myōgaku or engaku)
Perfect Enlightenment Sutra[円覚経] (Chin Yüan-chüeh-ching; Jpn Engaku-kyō)
Perfection of Wisdom sutras[般若波羅蜜経] (Jpn Hannya-haramitsu-kyō)
perfect precepts[円戒] (Jpn en-kai)
perfect teaching[円教] (Jpn en-gyō)
persons of incorrigible disbelief[一闡提] (Jpn issendai)
phantom city[化城] (Jpn kejō)
Pilindavatsa[畢陵伽婆蹉] (Skt; Jpn Hitsuryōgabasha)
Pindolabhāradvāja[賓頭盧] (Skt, Pali; Jpn Binzuru)
Pingala[青目・賓伽羅] (n.d.) (Skt; Jpn Shōmoku or Bingara)
pipal tree[インドボダイジュ] (Skt pippala; Jpn Indo-bodaiju)
pippala tree[畢鉢羅樹] (Skt; Jpn hippara-ju)
Pippalī Cave[畢鉢羅窟] (Skt; Jpn Hippara-kutsu)
pishācha[毘舎闍] (Skt; Jpn bishaja)
P’i-t’an school[毘曇宗] (PY Pitanzong; Jpn Bidon-shū)
pit of fire[火坑] (Jpn kakyō or kakō)
place of practice[道場] (Jpn dōjō)
planting the seeds of Buddhahood[下種] (Jpn geshu)
Platform Sutra, The[壇経] (Jpn Dan-kyō)
Platform Sutra of the Sixth Patriarch, The[六祖壇経] (Chin Liu-tsu-t’an-ching; Jpn Rokuso-dan-kyō)
Po Fa-tsu[帛法祖] (PY Bo Fazu; Jpn Haku-hōso)
poison-drum relationship[毒鼓の縁] (Jpn dokku-no-en)
poshadha[布薩] (Skt; Jpn fusatsu)
Possessor of Virtue[有徳王] (Jpn Utoku-ō)
Potalaka, Mount[補陀落山] (Skt; Jpn Fudaraku-sen)
power of another[他力] (Jpn tariki)
power of self[自力] (Jpn jiriki)
Po-yüan[帛遠] (PY Boyuan; Jpn Hakuon)
practice for oneself and others[自行化他] (Jpn jigyō-keta)
Praising Rebirth in the Pure Land[往生礼讃] (Chin Wang-sheng-li-tsan; Jpn Ōjō-raisan)
Praising the Buddha’s Deeds[仏所行讃] (Skt Buddhacharita; Chin Fo-so-hsing-tsan; Jpn Busshogyō-san)
Praising the Profundity of the Lotus Sutra[法華玄賛] (Chin Fa-hua-hsüan-tsan; Jpn Hokke-genzan)
prajnā[般若] (Skt; Jpn hannya)
Prajnā[般若] (b. 734) (Skt; Jpn Hannya)
prajnā-pāramitā[般若波羅蜜] (Skt; Jpn hannya-haramitsu)
Prajnāpāramitā sutras[般若経] (Skt; Jpn Hannya-kyō)
Prajnāruchi[般若流支] (n.d.) (Skt; Jpn Hannyarushi)
pranidhāna[誓願] (Skt; Jpn seigan)
Prāsangika school[帰謬論証派] (Skt; Jpn Kibyūronshō-ha)
Prasenajit[波斯匿王] (Skt; Pali Pasenadi; Jpn Hashinoku-ō)
pratigha[瞋恚・瞋] (Skt; Jpn shinni or shin)
pratītya-samutpāda[縁起・因縁] (Skt; Jpn engi or innen)
pratyekabuddha[縁覚・独覚・辟支仏] (Skt; Jpn engaku, dokkaku, or byakushibutsu)
pravārana[自恣] (Skt; Pali pavāranā; Jpn jishi)
prayer beads[数珠] (Jpn juzu)
Prayer for Rain Sutra[請雨経] (Chin Ch’ing-yü-ching; Jpn Shōu-kyō)
preaching in accordance with one’s own mind[随自意] (Jpn zuijii)
preaching in accordance with the minds of others[随他意] (Jpn zuitai)
precept for benefiting sentient beings[饒益有情戒・摂衆生戒] (Jpn nyōyaku-ujō-kai or shō-shujō-kai)
precept of adapting to local customs[随方毘尼] (Jpn zuihō-bini)
precept of the diamond chalice[金剛宝器戒] (Jpn kongō-hōki-kai)
precepts[戒] (Skt shīla; Pali sīla; Jpn kai)
precepts, meditation, and wisdom[戒定慧] (Jpn kai-jō-e)
precepts of perfect and immediate enlightenment[円頓戒] (Jpn endon-kai)
Precepts school[律宗] (Chin Lü-tsung; Jpn Risshū)
precept that encompasses all good deeds[摂善法戒] (Jpn shō-zembō-kai)
precept that encompasses all living beings[摂衆生戒] (Jpn shō-shujō-kai)
Precious Key to the Secret Treasury, The[秘蔵宝鑰] (Jpn Hizō-hōyaku)
pre-Lotus Sutra teachings[爾前教] (Jpn nizen-kyō)
preparation section[序分] (Jpn jo-bun)
preta[餓鬼・薜茘・薜茘多] (Skt; Jpn gaki, heirei, or heireita)
preventing error and putting an end to evil[防非止悪] (Jpn bōhi-shiaku)
Principle of Wisdom Sutra[理趣経] (Skt Ārya-prajnāpāramitā-naya-shatapanchashatikā; Chin Li-ch’ü-ching; Jpn Rishu-kyō)
Profound Meaning of the Four Mahayana Treatises, The[大乗四論玄義] (Chin Ta-ch’eng-ssu-lun-hsüan-i; Jpn Daijō-shiron-gengi)
Profound Meaning of the Lotus Sutra, The[法華玄義] (Chin Fa-hua-hsüan-i; Jpn Hokke-gengi)
Profound Meaning of the “Perceiver of the World’s Sounds” Chapter, The[観音玄義] (Chin Kuan-yin-hsüan-i; Jpn Kannon-gengi)
Profound Meaning of the Three Treatises, The[三論玄義] (Chin San-lun-hsüan-i; Jpn Sanron-gengi)
Profound Secrets Sutra[深密経] (Jpn Jimmitsu-kyō)
Pronunciation and Meaning in the Buddhist Scriptures[一切経音義] (Chin I-ch’ieh-ching-yin-i; Jpn Issaikyō-ongi)
Propagation of Zen for the Protection of the Country, The[興禅護国論] (Jpn Kōzen-gokoku-ron)
“Prophecies” chapter[人記品] (Jpn Ninki-hon)
“Prophecies Conferred on Learners and Adepts” chapter[授学無学人記品] (Jpn Jugaku-mugaku-ninki-hon)
“Prophecy of Enlightenment for Five Hundred Disciples” chapter[五百弟子受記品] (Jpn Gohyaku-deshi-juki-hon)
prophecy of future enlightenment[授記・記別・和伽羅那] (Skt vyākarana; Pali veyyākarana; Jpn juki, kibetsu, or wagarana)
Protection of the Sovereign of the Nation Sutra[守護国界経] (Chin Shou-hu-kuo-chieh-ching; Jpn Shugo-kokkai-kyō)
Protection Sutra[守護経] (Jpn Shugo-kyō)
protuberant knot of flesh[肉髻相] (Jpn nikkei-sō)
provincial temples[国分寺] (Jpn kokubun-ji)
provincial temples for nuns[国分尼寺] (Jpn kokubun-niji)
provisional Buddha[迹仏] (Jpn shakubutsu)
provisional Mahayana teachings[権大乗教] (Jpn gon-daijō-kyō)
provisional manifestation[権化] (Jpn gonge)
provisional sutras[権経] (Jpn gon-kyō)
provisional teachings[権教] (Jpn gon-kyō)
P’u-kuang[普光] (n.d.) (PY Puguang; Jpn Fukō)
Pu-k’ung[不空] (705–774) (PY Bukong; Skt Amoghavajra; Jpn Fukū)
punya[功徳・福徳] (Skt; Jpn kudoku or fukutoku)
Punyatāra[弗若多羅] (n.d.) (Skt; Jpn Futsunyatara)
Punyayashas[富那奢] (n.d.) (Skt; Jpn Funasha)
Pūrana Kassapa[富蘭那迦葉] (Pali; Jpn Furanna-kashō)
pure and far-reaching voice[梵音声] (Skt brahma-svara; Jpn bonnonjō)
Pure Emerald World[浄瑠璃世界] (Jpn Jōruri-sekai)
Pure Eye[浄眼] (Skt Vimalanetra; Jpn Jōgen)
pure land[浄土] (Jpn jōdo)
Pure Land of Perfect Bliss[極楽浄土] (Jpn Gokuraku-jōdo)
Pure Land of Secret Solemnity[密厳浄土] (Jpn Mitsugon-jōdo)
Pure Land school(1) [浄土門・浄土教・浄土宗] (Jpn Jōdo-mon, Jōdo-kyō, or Jōdo-shū); (2) [浄土宗] (Jpn Jōdo-shū)
Pure Land teachings[浄土門・浄土教] (Jpn Jōdo-mon or Jōdo-kyō)
pure Law[白法] (Jpn byakuhō)
Pure Practices[浄行菩薩] (Skt Vishuddhachāritra; Jpn Jōgyō-bosatsu)
Pure Storehouse[浄蔵] (Skt Vimalagarbha; Jpn Jōzō)
Pure Virtue[浄徳] (Skt Vimaladattā; Jpn Jōtoku)
purification of the six sense organs[六根清浄] (Jpn rokkon-shōjō)
Pūrna[富楼那] (Skt; Pali Punna; Jpn Furuna)
Pūrvavideha[弗婆提・勝身洲] (Skt; Jpn Hotsubadai or Shōshin-shū)
Pushyamitra[弗沙弥多羅王] (n.d.) (Skt; Jpn Hosshamittara-ō)
pūtana[富単那] (Skt; Jpn futanna)

pagoda [塔] (Jpn tō): A tower-like structure usually associated with temples or monasteries in East and Southeast Asia. The English word pagoda derives from the Portuguese pagode, the origin of which is unclear, but which also indicates this kind of structure. The pagoda developed from the ancient Indian stupa, which was dome- or mound-shaped and housed the remains or relics of kings, sages, or holy persons. After the death of Shakyamuni Buddha, stupas were built to house the Buddha’s ashes, which were divided among the various Indian states. As Buddhism spread through India and made its way into other countries, new forms of stupa, or pagoda, architecture developed. Initially, the pagoda was the focal point of a temple compound, housing sacred relics believed to be those of the Buddha. (***CC) The oldest standing three-storied pagoda in Japan is the one built in 706 at Hokki-ji temple. The three-storied pagoda at Yakushi-ji temple was built in 730. These oldest structures are located in Nara, the ancient capital of Japan. Pagodas of various designs can be found throughout East and Southeast Asia. One example is the ancient Shwe Dagon pagoda in Yangon, Myanmar, which was rebuilt in the eighteenth century and towers approximately a hundred meters.

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